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Old November 22nd, 2004, 04:38 PM
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Arrow Training a young puppy (advice needed)

I have a 10 week old Rat Terrier puppy and would really love to advice, tips etc...

We are crate training Batman. He doesn't like is crate but he doesn't hate it either. He cries when we leave him to go to work (never longer than 3 hours). When I get home he starts barking when he hears me. I try to wait for a break in the barks but there is never a very long break once he hears me. Any thoughts??? We live in an apartment so I really hesitate to do "practice" times in the crate. Is this really important? (To put him in and let him out once he stops barking)

House Training - Is going OK. The truth is he does have accidents inside (only pee). Sometimes he will pee 3 times so close together, and I catch the first one but not the others. This week he does seem to be holding it longer and doing bigger pees. Everytime I find a pee inside (about 2/ day) I get so upset with myself because I feel aweful that I missed it. The truth is I am totally exhausted from taking care of him and trying to work in 3 hour intervals. Sometimes I do look away while he is playing and that is when he sneaks in a pee. I am currently keeping track of his pees and poops, as well as his entire schedule so I can find patterns. I guess i would just like to know what is normal for a little puppy accident wise? I know some people are able to catch all the pees, but since I live in an apartment it is a bit more difficult I think.

Training in general. Batman knows sit quite well (he will sit for pretty much anyone), and his drop-it, come here, stay and OK are all developing very well. We are planning on taking him to obedience lessons but in the mean time what should his "training schedule" be like? What other things can I work on and how would you recommend I train him. Also I have a horrible habit of saying commands many times? Do you ever repeat? For example I will tell him to sit and he will suddenly start itching... how do I deal with that? I really want to do everything do make sure he is a happy, well behaved guy.

He loves meeting people more than anything and I would love for him to be the type of dog everyone feels comfortable around. Currently he jumps up at people when he meets them. He is so tiny and only 5 pounds so no one minds... but i don't want him to know it is OK. What should I do about that?? He bites/ mouths when he gets really excited when we are playing inside. How would you suggest I deal with that? Most of the time I try to just ignore him, but first I say no, and I also will sometimes give him his bone which he will usually chew for a good 10 minutes.

I really would love ANY type of input or tips etc.. that you experienced dog owners may have.
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Old November 22nd, 2004, 06:46 PM
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jjgeonerd jjgeonerd is offline
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I'm not sure about the peeing, except to say that puppies that young have to go a lot.

As far as commands...use hand signals. We were told that you only say a command once, but you can give the hand signal more than once. Our hand signal is to pretend you're holding a treat and move it from above their nose to back over their head (we started using a treat - we probably wouldn't if we had to do it over though). Gabby responds better to hand signals anyways. One way to make them sit if they aren't responding is to make eye contact (if you haven't already), if that doesn't work move closer to them like you're standing almost over them, lastly you can make them move a couple steps and start the process over again. Usually one of these works...be patient.

For jumping up...when they jump up turn away from them and ignore them. Eventually they will sit..then give them lots of praise. Always ignore them and turn away when they jump. When somebody else wants to pet them, explain you are training and ask them to wait (even though they will say its OK), then step on their leash leaving a couple inches of slack. That way when they try to jump it stops them, but isnt' applying pressure when they're just standing there.

Those worked for us!
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Old November 22nd, 2004, 08:54 PM
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Writing4Fun Writing4Fun is offline
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Jumping - he already knows how to sit? Great! Get him to sit each and every time you meet someone before they start petting him. If he stands up, ask them to stop petting and put him back into a sit. He'll learn that he's only going to get pets if he's sitting politely.

You seem to be doing really well with the rest of the training, so I won't bother offering the little advice I can there. I can't even offer advice on the crate, since I was home to train my puppy and she barely ever uses the crate anymore.

Congrats on your new puppy! So, when do we get to see pics?
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Old November 23rd, 2004, 08:25 AM
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I think I will try getting him to sit when meeting strangers... I sort of knew I should be doing this but I feel like people might think I am expecting too much of such a little guy. However today he is doing his stay, drop-it, take it and shake a paw quite well, so I think he is a fast learner and he seems to really enjoy doing these things.

Someone posted about training "take it" and "leave it". Any suggestions?

Batman's pictures are in our profile!
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Old November 28th, 2004, 03:01 PM
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tenderfoot tenderfoot is offline
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1 - "in the mean time what should his "training schedule" be like? "
Training is on going all of the time - because relationship is on going all of the time. Ask him to perform things throughout the day and try to make it fun. 30 minutes of grueling training could do more harm than good. But if you interact and communicate throughout the day and stay up beat about it, then he will be more interested cooperating with you.
2 - "For example I will tell him to sit and he will suddenly start itching... how do I deal with that?"
He is probably trying to distract you (get you to take the pressure off). Let him have his scratch and get back to it. OR you can get him up and moving and then start again. Some dogs will scratch or lie on their back frequently when they learn that it gets you to stop asking things of them. Try not to let him think it works.
3 - "Currently he jumps up at people when he meets them"
It is your job as the parent to teach manners. Keep him on the leash and try to get him to sit before anyone greets him. When his bottom is on the ground they can camly pet his cheek or neck. If he puts his mouth on them or starts to jump up they should pull their hand away and YOU say " no" in a firm tone and give a light leash correction. Invite him to try again. Usually it takes 3-5 tries to correct this behavior. But always end on a good note - do not let him end on failure. If you are not getting the response you want then you need to increase your intensity (not loudness) - so he knows you mean business.
If he jumps on you - then step towards him and tell him "off" in a low and firm tone. Use a flat hand going towards him as your hand signal - DO NOT threaten to hit him - use snappy, quick energy in your hand like you are trying to get him to blink. This tells him with your body language and voice that jumping into your space uninvited is not okay.
Another drill to do is to sit on the floor and have a treat/toy in your hand. If he jumps up to grab it do the same flat hand signal and say "off" OR wave your hands up and down in front of your body with your palms facing you. If he tries to jump into your space he will meet your hands and decide its not a fun place to jump in to. when he sits or lies in front of you and looks at you say "good, off" in a soft tone. You can let him sniff or lick the treat/toy, but try not to reward him each time with a treat.
It's really all about teaching good manners and boundaries. Be ready to reward good behavior but don't be afraid to correct bad behavior. ALWAYS end with good behavior. A child does not learn by hearing NO all of the time - they learn from knowing what they can do and being rewarded for it - try to make the rewards your touch and voice (relationship).
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Last edited by tenderfoot; November 28th, 2004 at 03:05 PM. Reason: addition
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Old November 28th, 2004, 03:03 PM
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tenderfoot tenderfoot is offline
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"Someone posted about training "take it" and "leave it". Any suggestions?"

Did you read the post or did you need it again? I still have my version of what I wrote, but you might be asking about someone elses post.
Perhaps you could be more specific.
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Last edited by tenderfoot; November 28th, 2004 at 03:04 PM. Reason: addition
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Old November 29th, 2004, 09:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tenderfoot
"Someone posted about training "take it" and "leave it". Any suggestions?"

Did you read the post or did you need it again? I still have my version of what I wrote, but you might be asking about someone elses post.
Perhaps you could be more specific.
I read a post somewhere that mentioned teaching "take it" & "leave it" but did not explain it. I would love to see your version (I have been going through many of your old posts for advice )

Thank you so much for your detailed reply Tenderfoot. I love reading your posts and you input. I wish you lived in Toronto!! I am just wondering what commands you would recommend us working on. We do currently do what you suggested - I am a dance teacher and have done a lot of psychology for that, it definitly helps! . We never "Train" for more than 10 minutes, but use his commands throughout the day. I am also wondering how we should deal with undesirable behaviour like barking or 'attacking' us when he gets excited. I have heard of timeouts (not more than a minute), and water bottles...

Batman is getting better and better with his commands, but is also testing boundaries. We are working on that. We are starting to get him to sit when meeting people... it is so hard because he is very different looking than most dogs in the neighbourhood and so tiny... People just go crazy when they see him and I hardly have a chance to correct his behaviour. Luckily now we seem to bump into the same people we have seen before so getting him to sit should be easier as they know us now.
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Old November 30th, 2004, 10:11 AM
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tenderfoot tenderfoot is offline
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"I am just wondering what commands you would recommend us working on. We do currently do what you suggested - I am a dance teacher and have done a lot of psychology for that, it definitly helps! . We never "Train" for more than 10 minutes, but use his commands throughout the day. I am also wondering how we should deal with undesirable behaviour like barking or 'attacking' us when he gets excited. I have heard of timeouts (not more than a minute), and water bottles... "

We have relationship drills that we do before we do any commands - so those are what I would start with, but in addition to those, 'Come' is the most important of all. Use a leash to empower your words and work towards a longer and longer leash - start inside (least distracitons) and work towards greater distractions outside. Make it a very happy sounding command and make sure he comes to you, sits in front of you and looks you in the eye for the next command. These three steps ensure a good 'come' and keep you in control. If he gets distracted during the 'come' then correct him with the leash and a firm 'no' or voice correction of some type - just enough to get his attention and then get all happy again and invite him to finish. You might end up interupting yourself a few times as you react to his every move, but you will both get it quickly enough.

Give names to all if his toys and play fetch with them. Name all of the rooms in the house and teach him to go there on command. Eat & Drink are very important commands. When you see him doing either say "Good eat or good drink", these can help him if he ever gets sick and he will at least try to do it because you asked.

Here are some more ideas for commands:
Sit
Down (lay)
Sleep (lay on side)
Be a bear (beg)
Heel (walk at the side)
Up (from down to sit)
Roll over
Stand
Stay
Shake
Scoot(crawl on belly)
No
Okay (release)
Stop
Quiet
Leave it
Move
Off
Drop
Take it
Quit
Easy (gentle)
Play
Home
Car
Back (back of car)
Potty
Toys (bone, ball, fuzzy)
Bed
Crate
Eat & Drink
Circle
Find it

We don't care for water bottles - they often lose their effect quickly and they really aren't connected to the dogs relationship with you. We also don't do timeouts. If you observe dogs in a pack, they usually correct each other in the moment and are right back at being buddies again fairly quickly. They continue to give each other second chances to make better choices, that's really what teaches.

Having him on the leash as much as possible in the house is great for creating opportunites to correct barking or attacking you. It is a tool to use when you would normally be too late to make a correction and he would just learn he is faster than you are. But the leash helps you catch a behavior and correct it or reward it. I usually attach it to my jeans belt loop so my hands are free. It also places you in the leadership roles as you go about your day. Every where you go he must follow.

"People just go crazy when they see him and I hardly have a chance to correct his behaviour. "

Ask the people to help you teach him. People love to help! Tell them how you would like them to respond if he is doing well and how to respond if he makes a mistake (jumping up) - that way you don't feel so rude for interupting the get-together and they are helping teach too.
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Old November 30th, 2004, 10:12 AM
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tenderfoot tenderfoot is offline
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Here's the "Drop & tTake it" info.
Teaching 'drop it' and 'take it' is one of the very first things we teach. It is a matter of respect when it comes to dropping things to you on command. He needs to learn that all things belong to you - even if he found them first.

First, put your dog on the leash (for control) then get a stick or stiff toy at least 6 inches long - not a soft toy he can get a grip on or food he can break off and swallow. Start with an object that doesn't have high value to him and work towards an object that does have high value. Food will probably be the toughest challenge as it is easy for him to just swallow it and win.
Offer it to your dog and say 'take it' in a happy tone. let him chew on it for 15 seconds - do not let go of the item. Say 'drop it' short, sharp and firm in tone. Almost startle him with the command as you point quickly at the item and his nose. The startle alone should impress him. If he lets go then praise him and gently stroke his face and head. If he does not let go - ask again and vibrate the item in his mouth moving towards the back of his mouth. This should be strong enough to make him want to let go, but not so strong to hurt him. When he releases be very pleased and praise & pet.
Repeat this - holding the item and sharing it with your dog for longer times each round. As he gives willingly then allow the item to be his for just a few seconds, keeping your hand close by and then move your hand in and ask him to 'drop it'. Again increasing times until it can be his for five minutes and he still drops it nicely to you. Working him in his normal obedience commands just before you do this can help. It places him a submissive role and makes him more agreeable over all and ready to be more cooperative.

Practice a lot when you are just hanging around the house - get him to drop dozens of things throughout the day, don't wait to teach it when you need it and don't avoid teaching good manners like you did today.
This command is serious enough to save his life. What if it were a pill you dropped? or a big chunk of chocolate?
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