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Old December 6th, 2013, 09:47 PM
Marc Marc is offline
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Partial (ovary-sparing) spay in Southern Ontario, Canada

Does anyone know of a veterinarian that performs partial (ovary-sparing) spaying in Southern Ontario, Canada (Toronto in particular)? Or, do you have a holistic, forward-thinking vet that you think may be willing to perform a partial spay?

Thanks in advance!

Last edited by Marc; December 7th, 2013 at 09:56 AM.
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Old December 6th, 2013, 11:09 PM
Digston Digston is offline
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Excuse my bluntness... but why would you choose to do a partial spay?
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Old December 6th, 2013, 11:43 PM
Marc Marc is offline
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I encourage you to do your own research and reach your own conclusions about partial spaying.

Here are some good places to start:
http://www.parsemusfoundation.org/ovary-sparing-spay/
http://www.ivcjournal.com/articles/t...-partial-spay/
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Old December 7th, 2013, 08:06 AM
Longblades Longblades is offline
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More and more research, mostly on humans and dogs I find, is coming out to suggest the benefits of ovary producing estrogen is significant and contributes to better health and longer life for the female of the species.

I think you will have to be checking out websites and making phone calls or maybe sending out emails. Another consideration, I think, is leaving only part of an ovary in. A female, human co-worker had that done about 30 years ago but unfortunately I've lost track of her.
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Old December 7th, 2013, 03:14 PM
Digston Digston is offline
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I just don't see any scientific studies so I will remain skeptical.

As for the surgery itself, it doesn't look like anything to obscure. Any vet who has practiced long enough and who knows their anatomy should be able to perform a hysterectomy easy enough. I agree that I would call around and see who is comfortable doing one, as it does require more precision than your typical ovariohysterectomy. Do you have a veterinarian that you've seen already for vaccinations? Perhaps if they aren't comfortable doing it, they can refer you to someone who can.
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Old December 7th, 2013, 06:51 PM
Longblades Longblades is offline
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http://www.parsemusfoundation.org/ovary-sparing-spay/
Ovary Sparing Spay
Parsemus Foundation works to advance innovative and neglected medical research.

http://www.stbernardhealth.co.uk/pyometrainthebitch.htm
Pyometra in the Bitch
Jenny King

http://news.uns.purdue.edu/x/2009b/0...nResearch.html
Message for women and dogs: keeping ovaries is linked to longevity
To the Purdue Research Park, http://www.purdueresearchpark.com

http://www.rockllewellinsetters.com/...talDec2009.pdf
Exploring mechanisms of sex differences in longevity: lifetime ovary exposure and exceptional longevity in dogs
David J. Waters,1,2 Seema S. Kengeri,1 Beth Clever,1 Julie A. Booth,1 Aimee H. Maras,1 Deborah L.
Schlittler1 and Michael G. Hayek3

http://www.gpmcf.org/respectovaries.html
A Healthier Respect for Ovaries (in dogs)
David J. Waters, DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACVS
Director, Center for Exceptional Longevity Studies
Gerald P. Murphy Cancer Foundation

I'm not sure if all of these address health and longevity links to maintaining ovaries. Just a quick copy from my list.
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Old December 8th, 2013, 11:17 AM
Digston Digston is offline
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Thank you Longblades!! The information presented by Dr. Waters is more of what I was looking for!
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Old December 10th, 2013, 05:41 PM
Marc Marc is offline
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Much appreciated Longblades.

I really don't know why there is so much controversy over partial spays. I mean we are all aware of the changes and negative side effects associated with menopause in humans. Why would we subject our dogs to the same fate?
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Old December 10th, 2013, 06:51 PM
Digston Digston is offline
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I've never heard of anyone doing a hysterectomy before; It was always just ovariectomy or ovariohysterectomy. From someone who is just learning of hysterectomy's being performed in animals, I believe that the controversy is based on the fact that we know estrogen plays a role in many reproductive system cancers. That every heat cycle an animal goes through increases the chances of mammary, ovarian, and uterine cancers. The research into estrogen loss causing shortened life spans is still relatively new in respects to vet med (And appears to be mostly based on studies with Rottweilers).

IMO, without the science to back the benefits of leaving the ovaries, this will remain a topic of varied opinion. The known benefits of removal outweigh the possible benefits of not.

Heck, even when the research is sound and the theory proven, I bet there will still be controversy. Just as there is now between spay advocates and anti-spay crazies <-- another of my opinions People cray cray, yo! (That last sentence is a result of my brain melting down from too much studying... I'm pretty sure that finals are causing me to lose intelligence rather than gain it)


BTW what breed of dog do you have? Perhaps it's a cat! Oh what a twist that would be!
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Old December 11th, 2013, 07:34 AM
Longblades Longblades is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marc View Post
Much appreciated Longblades.

I really don't know why there is so much controversy over partial spays. I mean we are all aware of the changes and negative side effects associated with menopause in humans. Why would we subject our dogs to the same fate?
Menopause in humans is something that occurs naturally. In my readings its unusually early, medical, surgical or natural, menpause that seems to have the most negative side effects. And that's what we do to dogs and cats by spaying. And it doesn't seem to be quite the same for cats, not as bad.

Dr. Karen Becker has a fairly new Youtube out where she cries about all the dogs she now feels she needlessly urged neutering on. I'll see if I can find it and post.
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Old December 11th, 2013, 09:35 AM
Marc Marc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Digston View Post
I've never heard of anyone doing a hysterectomy before; It was always just ovariectomy or ovariohysterectomy. From someone who is just learning of hysterectomy's being performed in animals, I believe that the controversy is based on the fact that we know estrogen plays a role in many reproductive system cancers. That every heat cycle an animal goes through increases the chances of mammary, ovarian, and uterine cancers. The research into estrogen loss causing shortened life spans is still relatively new in respects to vet med (And appears to be mostly based on studies with Rottweilers).

IMO, without the science to back the benefits of leaving the ovaries, this will remain a topic of varied opinion. The known benefits of removal outweigh the possible benefits of not.

Heck, even when the research is sound and the theory proven, I bet there will still be controversy. Just as there is now between spay advocates and anti-spay crazies <-- another of my opinions People cray cray, yo! (That last sentence is a result of my brain melting down from too much studying... I'm pretty sure that finals are causing me to lose intelligence rather than gain it)


BTW what breed of dog do you have? Perhaps it's a cat! Oh what a twist that would be!
I have a deeply devoted and loving 2yo Dutch Shepherd. Thanks for asking.


Here are some additional, evidence-based resources addressing the risks and benefits of spaying/neutering:

http://www.tc.umn.edu/~rootk001/gonadectomy.pdf
Determining the optimal age for gonadectomy of dogs and cats
Margaret V. Root Kustritz 2007

http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongT...uterInDogs.pdf
Long-Term Health Risks and Benefits Associated with Spay / Neuter in Dogs
Laura J. Sanborn 2007

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%...l.pone.0055937
Neutering Dogs: Effects on Joint Disorders and Cancers in Golden Retrievers
Lynette A. Hart et al. 2013



Quote:
Originally Posted by Longblades View Post
Menopause in humans is something that occurs naturally. In my readings its unusually early, medical, surgical or natural, menpause that seems to have the most negative side effects. And that's what we do to dogs and cats by spaying. And it doesn't seem to be quite the same for cats, not as bad.

Dr. Karen Becker has a fairly new Youtube out where she cries about all the dogs she now feels she needlessly urged neutering on. I'll see if I can find it and post.
It is interesting that it may not be the same in cats, but given how much gene similarity there is between dogs and humans, it would be presumptuous to consider human studies do not have any relevance to dogs. After all, most of what we have learned about human physiology and pathophysiology in the last 10-15 is deeply rooted in studies with mice; and about gene regulation in studies with fruit flies.
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