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  #1  
Old October 27th, 2007, 02:41 PM
samijane samijane is offline
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Exclamation My 7 month old yorkie might be pregnant..what do I do?!

This morning I found out that for a fact, last night my 7 month old yorkie could've gotten pregnant by the male that I also own! I'm wondering if there's something I can do about this, because at 7 months old she isn't going to be a good mother and there are too many health risks for her and the puppies. If Brooklyn died or if anything happened to her while giving birth I don't know what I'd do. My puppies are practically my children! I'm wondering if anyone has any advice on what to do?! Please help!
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Old October 27th, 2007, 02:46 PM
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Take her to the vet and have the puppies aborted and her spayed at the same time.
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Old October 27th, 2007, 02:51 PM
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Reply to rainbow

I'm not completely sure she's even pregnant. I just know that they "tied" last night, for the first time ever. This is also her first heat ever. And I don't want to spay her because at some point I would like them to have puppies. Just not this soon, she is only 7 months old! And he is 2.
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Old October 27th, 2007, 03:10 PM
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Why do you want to breed them? Do you have a mentor?
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Old October 27th, 2007, 03:19 PM
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Is it possible to abort without spaying? Better ask a vet. If not, are you willing to put her health (and perhaps her life) at risk just because you want to breed her later? What kind of trade-off is that? And why would you leave a female in heat unsupervised around an intact male?
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Old October 27th, 2007, 03:53 PM
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I think first of all, take her to the vet to find out if she is pregnant. If so, I would have the pups aborted and her spayed in one operation. Just think of the alternative, if she is pregnant and they can just abort the pups, I'm guessing that means surgery (I'm no expert on this but don't think there is any magic abortion pill for dogs.). This is hard on her. Then if you breed her later, the pregnancy is also hard on her body. Then there is giving up the pups. That is also hard on her. Then she will need to be spayed at some point in her life. That will also be hard on her body. How much are you willing to put her through? I would look at it all from the dogs perspective and make a loving decision.
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Old October 27th, 2007, 04:14 PM
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The word euthanizes millions of dogs (that's right MILLIONS) and puppies per year. What make you think it's a good thing to bring into the world even one more ? And, your dog, given her youth and size may well die with giving birth. Please, for the sake of all the dogs sitting in shelters today who may well be euthanized for lack of homes, take her to a Vet, get her spayed and the puppies aborted now.
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Old October 27th, 2007, 07:47 PM
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Unhappy

Please talk to a vet about having the puppies aborted now,while it's early and not so hard on her AND you. She's too young to have puppies in my opinion. There are SO may puppies in this world already.
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Old October 27th, 2007, 08:50 PM
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i agree with rainbow way to early get her fixed asap tooooooooooooo many pups in rescue
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Old October 28th, 2007, 08:01 PM
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Unless you've put titles on your male with plans to health test, or he has been health tested, and plan to do the same for your girl.. I'd spay her. There are enough pet puppies in this world which is fine. I'm sure they are wonderful pets, but there is no reason to breed them.
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Old October 29th, 2007, 10:06 PM
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Its shocking that everyone's answer is just to abort her puppies IF she's even pregnant. I'm not sure, and how long does it take to find out? Also, someone posted why did I leave her unsupervised- I left them both with my mom overnight because I was out of town, I do NOT board my dogs- ever. Everyone is saying "make a loving decision" well, I look at my dogs like people (which sounds crazy I know) and I couldn't imagine making her have an abortion- even though I know she won't understand what's going on anyways, it makes me sick. And yes I know there's enough puppies in the world already- but there's enough people in the world without homes, food, etc. and the answer isn't just to abort every baby when the mother gets pregnant now is it? I got on this website to get some good advice, with some facts behind it- and that's just not happening. Most people are throwing out abortion as the answer and they don't even know what they're talking about. Which makes me wonder if that's just their answer to pregnancy period. I was hoping for insight from someone who's had a pregnant dog before or at least been in a similar situation- or from someone who knows what they're talking about, at least to some degree. Thanks.
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Old October 29th, 2007, 10:18 PM
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Because you asked...I have held dying puppies in my hands from a young mom (through no fault of her own) not able to birth nor care for them. The mom would have lost her life if it were not for extremely expensive and emergency surgery. I would never want to see another dog nor pup suffer like this ever again.

Only a vet will be able to tell you whether or not she is pregnant. When you come to a public forum for advice, that's just what you'll get, whether you like what you hear or not. Sorry.

that your dog (and her pups if you choose to go through with this if she is indeed pregnant) will survive.
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Old October 29th, 2007, 10:40 PM
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Another thought...if you really want advice from someone experienced, why not contact a responsible, reputable breeder (not a BYB or puppymill operator) of the same breed as yours. Explain the situation as well as the age of your puppy. You'll be quite surprised of the advice they'll offer to you as well.

You say you think of your dogs as humans, many of us care for dogs this deeply as well. But if that were true, then what would you think of your 5 year old, undeveloped daughter giving birth? Because in essence, that's exactly what you would be expecting of her if she is pregnant :sad: .
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Old October 30th, 2007, 12:09 AM
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Here's some information for you to read:

http://www.woodhavenlabs.com/breeding/breeder2.html

http://www.woodhavenlabs.com/breeding/breeder3.html

http://www.brightlion.com/InHope/InHope_en.aspx
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Old October 30th, 2007, 06:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samijane View Post
This morning I found out that for a fact, last night my 7 month old yorkie could've gotten pregnant by the male that I also own! I'm wondering if there's something I can do about this, because at 7 months old she isn't going to be a good mother and there are too many health risks for her and the puppies. If Brooklyn died or if anything happened to her while giving birth I don't know what I'd do. My puppies are practically my children! I'm wondering if anyone has any advice on what to do?! Please help!
You can't ask for advice and then get angry when you don't get the answers you want to hear. Your puppy (she is a puppy), is too young to give birth safely. Everyone here has reccommended you take her to a vet and get her spayed and the puppies aborted...that is if you really want what's best for your dog.

Cindy
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Old October 30th, 2007, 08:24 AM
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Quote:
And yes I know there's enough puppies in the world already- but there's enough people in the world without homes, food, etc. and the answer isn't just to abort every baby when the mother gets pregnant now is it?
People can make their own decisions .. dogs can NOT. It's up to owners and people who care to look out for animals. You think she wants to have puppies?

It's your irresponsible actions that allowed her to get pregnant and IMO, if you cared about her (and dogs in general) you'd get her spayed and abort the puppies asap.

I volunteer at the humane society in my area and I can tell you, there are cages and cages full of dogs looking for homes. Some days I feel happy because I see a huge number of dogs getting adopted ... but you know something? The next the day the cages are ALL full again with more dogs that need homes.
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Old October 30th, 2007, 09:11 AM
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A 7 month old yorkie weighs about what - 2 pounds? That is way to small to have puppies.

For several years when I was a child my mom raised and showed pomeranians. She bred 4 litters in 6 years and we lost more puppies then survived. And our bitches were older and had experience. We even lost a bitch in labor.

As someone who is experienced with delivering litters of puppies - in both small and large breed dogs - the advice given is the best thing both for your particular girl and for the breed. While it may sound very harsh (and not what you wanted to hear), would you make your 6 year old daughter have a baby?
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Old October 30th, 2007, 09:16 AM
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Have you discussed the possible pregnancy and the risks with your vet and/or a rep breeder. You must do what is in the best interests for your dog, not you, she doesn't care if she has any babies, she just wants to play, eat, sleep and be loved. The ultimate decision is yours of course.

If she is not pregnant, please visit your local shelter before making the decision to breed her and talk to the employees there. I think after that visit you will understand where the members of this board are coming from.

I would have a very hard time aborting the pups, but not if my dogs life was at risk.
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Old October 30th, 2007, 11:06 AM
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I think the first thing you need to do is look at your dog as a dog, not a human with human emotions. They don't provide conselling for dogs who go thru abortions, nore do they provide conselling to dogs after they give away all the puppies from the litter. They don't function or think like humans even tho we humanize them. I am not saying we don't love our critters or that your concern isn't real, but you need to look at the health of your dog as a dog not a human who's sent to an abortion clinic.

I too think if you talk to a real breeder and those folks who work in a shelter you will realize this world doesn't need more dogs, especially those with health and genetic issues. If you are planning to breed for the money, do some research, a real breeder who puts the animals first, doesn't clear the $700 you charge for each puppy.

Fingers crossed your doggie is ok.
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Old October 30th, 2007, 11:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samijane View Post
Most people are throwing out abortion as the answer and they don't even know what they're talking about.
They don't know what they're talking about ? Many of them volunteer for rescues , many of them see what's happening in shelters , it seems you're the one who doesn't know what you're talking about. Obviously you came here to ask a question , you did get answers , if you don't like them , I guess you don't really care about the well being of your dog , because believe me , your female might die because of this.

Last edited by Frenchy; October 30th, 2007 at 08:29 PM.
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Old October 30th, 2007, 08:15 PM
samijane samijane is offline
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To love4himies & lavenderott:
Thank you so much for your advice. It wasn't that I didn't like the answers I got, it was that I was getting them from people who didn't have any experience themselves. I was looking for someone to respond that had a dog who had given birth. Your advice was very helpful. And if anyone noticed- it was the same advice as everyone else gave, just with KNOWLEDGE behind it. Anyways, my 7 month old is actually a little more than 6 pounds. And my male is about 8. I have full size yorkies that came from large parents, because I don't care for the genetic issues and health issues that come with breeding tiny dogs and trying to breed to get the smallest pup possible. Tea cups I am referring to. When I purchased both of my yorkies I told the people I bought them from that I was looking for yorkies that were of a normal size as far as dogs go and hadn't been inbred etc to get a tiny tiny size dog. My fiance's boss at work as went through 4 TEACUP yorkies in the past couple years because of the terrible health problems that dogs that size end up with. Anyways, I'm taking my little girl to the vet next week and we'll go from there I guess. My point was, I'm not spaying her end of story. One other question, luckypenny wrote that you went through expensive emergency surgery due to birthing complications-- I was wondering what your situation was and what the total cost ended up being, if you don't mind me asking. Thanks.
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Old October 30th, 2007, 08:30 PM
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Originally Posted by samijane View Post
My point was, I'm not spaying her end of story.
You refuse to listen to reason about protecting the health of your dog and the HUGE number of unwanted and euthanized back-yard-bred puppies (like yours) but...

Quote:
Originally Posted by samijane View Post
One other question, luckypenny wrote that you went through expensive emergency surgery due to birthing complications-- I was wondering what your situation was and what the total cost ended up being, if you don't mind me asking. Thanks.
you worried about the cost of "expensive emergency surgery"

That pretty much tells me everything I need to know about you and how much you actually care for dogs period, let alone your own.
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  #23  
Old October 30th, 2007, 09:03 PM
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You have to do what is good for the dog, and not for you. Dogs and cats aren't material possessions, cash machines or fashion accessories. They are intelligent, living creatures who deserve more than an existence of manufacturing.

I suggest you calm down, and do some thinking. Why exactly do you want to breed those dogs?

Do you want to observe the pregnancy and birth out of curiosity? Do you think the dog actually knows about bearing young and desires it? Do you want to have extra dogs in your household and not have to purchase or adopt more? Are you wanting to sell them, thinking you can make some cash?

I agree with the others..way too many unwanted animals on this planet right now and millions are dying.

If people didn't give you the answers you wanted to hear, then share what advice you hoped to receive instead.
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Old October 30th, 2007, 09:09 PM
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Your dog is a baby herself - she needs an abortion, plain and simple. You cannot ascribe anthropomorphic or human emotions to a dog. Ethics yes but canine ethics. Your dog will be healthier (and you may save her life!!) if she has an abortion. As a physician, I chair an ethics committee where we deal with some horrendous decisions - usually end of life or beginning of life and they are not easy. These ar humans with all the complications that families and individuals have.

Dogs think differently than we do and physiologically, their bodies are ,much different. Your dog really really needs an abortion - not puppies when she is so young herself and a small dog on top of all of that. You will doing her a medical, ethical and loving favour if you abort those fetuses as fast as possible before there are problems. I am sure you love your dog - please help her!!!!!
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Old October 30th, 2007, 09:20 PM
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My 7 month

You asked questions, ypu asked opinions, you asked for personal experiences, you got all but 'I'm not spaying her - end of story!' so why keep asking?
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Old October 30th, 2007, 09:24 PM
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Although the mother was a bit older than your puppy, she was still too young and underdeveloped to breed.

For an emergency c-section, x-rays, medication, formula & supplements for puppies, x-rays for one pup, feeding tubes, sub-q solution, needles, syringes, hot water bottles, crates, x-pen, toys, numerous vet visits for puppies, worming medication, vaccinations, and yes, spaying of all surviving puppies, approx. 7000$. And most of this care other than the surgeries and x-rays were carried out in the home. It would have been more than triple had they all been left at the vet hospital for treatment. This is not a final tally as they may still need special medical care in the future.

This figure does not include 24 hour around the clock care for the first 6 weeks, feeding every two hours, nor does it include 9 weeks of lost wages, not just for myself, but for others who came to our aid. It also does not include the anguish suffered by the many people, who fought so hard to help, when some of the puppies died due to various complications.

Had there not been an emergency vet hospital open late in the evening and in the wee hours of the morning, the mother and all of the puppies would have died.

Please, take your puppy to see a vet. Do what's right for her. And, for what it's worth, at the very least consider doing your own little part to stop the vicious circle of millions of unwanted pets suffering and being put to death each year. No, you alone are not the answer, but you don't have to be part of the problem.

Please, please review the links Rainbow had posted. These situations are more frequent than you, or I, can ever have imagined :sad:.
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Last edited by luckypenny; October 30th, 2007 at 09:29 PM.
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Old October 30th, 2007, 09:41 PM
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There is no such credible entity as a "tea cup". Any reputable breeder will tell you to ruin as fast as you can if anyone claims they have a tea cup. So, please , whioeer told you that is a back yard breeder~!!!! And please do not akllow your puppy to become used as a back yard breeder either - you will only bring more unwanted puppies into a world where there are thousands too many now- and you will endanger your health.

We atre not being unfriendly r nasty. You asked for our honest answers and this is what we are doing - trying to help you and your dog - trying to perhaps save her life. Many of us have seen young cats and dogs give birth and die or almost die. It is not even the cost so much as the health of your puppy - and she is a puppy. Please - I know you must love her or you would not =keep posting. Thin kof her health and LIFE first and foremost,.

I am a pediatric oncologist work with dying children. I urge not to allow your dog to become a statistic - which given what you are saying, is entirely possible. I am not trying to sacre you - this is the real worked for a small dog.

One of my best friends is a reputable Yorkie breeder - she breeds her once a year and that is IT. And now she plans to get out of breedimng because hse does not want to be adding to the population of dogs. I applaud her choice!!

This dog is a Grand Champion and of breeding quality. Unless a dog has won at least several championships, she has absolutely no business being bred with ANY dog, EVER!!! if there are accidents because someone neglected to spay her (reputable breeders spay their pet quality puppies asap) . And she is finding it a little too expensive- the travel to shows, the work and so forth - and she has a good income as a family physician. Can you afford the thousand s of dollars - and no reputable breeder would dare allow a dog that young to be bred. It is not acceptable bit most importantly and I reiterate, it can KILL your dog - and at least damage her health. PLEASE PLEASE spay her!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old October 30th, 2007, 10:14 PM
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If you won't think of your poor pup (won't have her spayed), then be responsible and do the math first. If she has only one litter and 4 pups in a lifetime and each of those only have 4 pups, carry this over 10 years and you have hundreds of dogs in her family tree. It's an exponential curve. Spend 5 minutes please and do the math and then visit a few shelters and see the result.
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Old October 31st, 2007, 06:41 AM
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Samijane,

Please visit your local shelter if you are not going to get her spayed. The decision to breed should be done after you have all the facts and a fact is there are too many dogs looking for homes.

If you really want to have the experience of puppies, check with your shelter about fostering a pregnant dog, this will give you the experience before you make the decision to put your beloved dog through this. Remember, she doesn't care if she has babies.
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Old October 31st, 2007, 01:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samijane View Post
This morning I found out that for a fact, last night my 7 month old yorkie could've gotten pregnant by the male that I also own! I'm wondering if there's something I can do about this, because at 7 months old she isn't going to be a good mother and there are too many health risks for her and the puppies. If Brooklyn died or if anything happened to her while giving birth I don't know what I'd do. My puppies are practically my children! I'm wondering if anyone has any advice on what to do?! Please help!
You will admit that at such a young age there are just too many health risks for your dog and any puppies she may be carrying, yet in the same breath you are adamant that she will not be spayed. What exactly do you intend to do to ensure this puppy of yours ( and she is a puppy ) does not give birth if she indeed is pregnant? The ONLY thing you can do is take her to the vet, and terminate this pregnancy if there is one....that is all, no other options. To let it take it's course is putting your puppy in extreme danger IMO, as well as negligent and cruel on your part.


Never mind all the other factors such as pet overpopulation and the real dangers to your dog, have you considered the health risks to your Yorkie if you decide not to spay her? My friend's dog is suffering as we speak of mammary cancer...a heart-breaking and VERY expensive to treat reality that you are facing with unaltered female dogs. She is wishing now that she had spayed her girl, but too little too late for her.

You say that if Brooklyn died you wouldn't know what to do.... This is a REAL possibility if you ignore the facts.
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