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Old May 12th, 2012, 10:32 PM
miamorgana miamorgana is offline
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Question about why my girl bled out from the nose and mouth after death.

Hello I lost my beautiful girl just a few days ago. She was a Rhodesian Ridgeback x Mastiff, 13 years old and approximately 58kg. I didn't have the heart to send her off to investigate the cause of death but I am curious still.

She was on my bed and let out a deep cry, I thought she had a leg cramp as she stretched out one leg kind of arching (I hope that makes sense) I massaged her leg she looked at me and then she was gone, I think it took about 30-40 seconds.

I understand that its rare for dogs to have a heart attack (as we perceive a human heart attack) but I need to try to understand the nature of such a catastrophic event that could kill her so quickly. She had her vet checks just recently and all her blood and urine test came back normal, generally she was a healthy girl for her age, a little arthritic and a few benign lumps but healthy.

The only clue I can give is that approximately 8 hours after death blood began to discharge from her nose although her mouth was also bloody. A little like a foam/froth that bubbled out but then it settled into an slow weep. 18 hours after death the blood was dark and clotted. Although there were pools of blood there was enough to soak through 2 thick quilts and into the mattress.

Could this be an indication of aneurysm? What could have killed her so quickly? I know that I will never get the exact answer but I am hoping that someone could at least give me an idea of the physiological processes that might be linked to the bleeding. Could it also be just a natural process?

Thank you for your time.
Morgana

Last edited by miamorgana; May 13th, 2012 at 01:41 AM. Reason: typing error
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Old May 12th, 2012, 11:55 PM
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pbpatti pbpatti is offline
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I am so sorry that your sweet girl passed. I have no idea what would cause the bleeding you describe. Perhaps if you call her Vet they can give you some answers.
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Old May 13th, 2012, 12:07 AM
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Goldfields Goldfields is offline
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miamorgana, I once watched a dog die of a heart attack at a show. A beautiful 3 year old Old English Sheepdog it was. I was accross the ring from it, admiring from afar, and it simply turned its head around to the side and fell, dead when it hit the ground. And, a friend's Dane just lay down in the sun for a sleep one day and never woke up. So, it can be sudden. Also, we had a Hackney horse drop dead in the paddock, no kick or scuff marks where he fell, and he had just a trickle of blood in his nostril. I think it can be a blessing for them to go so suddenly, even if it is an awful shock for us. You have my sympathy and I hope someone can give you a satisfactory answer.
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Old June 3rd, 2012, 08:45 AM
miamorgana miamorgana is offline
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Thank you for your words. I am still none the wiser and I'm sure I will never know for certain, but I still wonder every day.
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Old June 3rd, 2012, 01:58 PM
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hazelrunpack hazelrunpack is offline
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I'm so sorry for your loss, miamorgana

There are cancers of the blood vessels that result in very vascular tumors that often rupture and result in the dog bleeding out. Perhaps your sweet girl had something like that--perhaps more than one. They often form on the spleen and then metastasize--so the primary one on her spleen could have burst when she died, and a secondary one in her snout or GI tract then burst shortly after. But of course it's just a guess...

13 years! That's wonderful longevity for a mastiff cross! I can tell from the way you write about her that she was well-loved. I know how difficult it is to lose them, but she passed so quickly and peacefully with you at her side! What a blessing that is!

I wish you heart's ease and happy memories to bolster you through this difficult time. When you're ready, we do have a Rainbow Bridge forum where you can post a memorial of your sweet girl. We'd love to hear about her!

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Old July 8th, 2012, 01:08 PM
Barkingdog Barkingdog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miamorgana View Post
Hello I lost my beautiful girl just a few days ago. She was a Rhodesian Ridgeback x Mastiff, 13 years old and approximately 58kg. I didn't have the heart to send her off to investigate the cause of death but I am curious still.

She was on my bed and let out a deep cry, I thought she had a leg cramp as she stretched out one leg kind of arching (I hope that makes sense) I massaged her leg she looked at me and then she was gone, I think it took about 30-40 seconds.

I understand that its rare for dogs to have a heart attack (as we perceive a human heart attack) but I need to try to understand the nature of such a catastrophic event that could kill her so quickly. She had her vet checks just recently and all her blood and urine test came back normal, generally she was a healthy girl for her age, a little arthritic and a few benign lumps but healthy.

The only clue I can give is that approximately 8 hours after death blood began to discharge from her nose although her mouth was also bloody. A little like a foam/froth that bubbled out but then it settled into an slow weep. 18 hours after death the blood was dark and clotted. Although there were pools of blood there was enough to soak through 2 thick quilts and into the mattress.

Could this be an indication of aneurysm? What could have killed her so quickly? I know that I will never get the exact answer but I am hoping that someone could at least give me an idea of the physiological processes that might be linked to the bleeding. Could it also be just a natural process?

Thank you for your time.
Morgana
I am so sorry to hear about the lost of beloved pet.
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