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  #1  
Old October 21st, 2011, 09:40 PM
RockyCdn RockyCdn is offline
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Angry Cat had hair pulled off - need advice

I have an indoor cat, a beautiful 2 1/2 year old tuxedo. She wears (wore) a body collar so that I could take her out on the deck occasionally on a leash to chase the birds and enjoy the fresh air.

BUT.... a roommate recently moved in and when I wasn't home, took her out, but when she brought her back into the house left the leash on her. I believe the leash must have gotten tangled up in furniture. When I got home, my poor cat had worked her way out of the body collar and had torn off a patch of hair in the process. She must have been so scared. (What kind of person does that to an innocent cat???)

The patch looked okay the first day, but now it's seeping a bit of blood. I can't afford to take her to the vet for another week. Does anyone have a suggestion for how I can take care of the wound in the meantime?

Thanks
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Old October 21st, 2011, 10:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RockyCdn View Post
I can't afford to take her to the vet for another week.
I'd be insisting that the roommate pay for the vet visit.
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  #3  
Old October 22nd, 2011, 03:06 AM
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renegaderuby renegaderuby is offline
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General first aid should be the ticket until you can take her in. But yes, I would suggest your room mate foot the bill. And maybe some "GENTLE" education of the roommate on what "NOT" to do with "kitty".
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Old November 23rd, 2011, 01:51 AM
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Koteburo Koteburo is offline
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Keep it disinfected with hydrogen peroxide morning and night applied with a cotton ball. There's also a violet tincture to disinfect but although it's good it might dry the kitty's skin maybe a 1 time application and keep using the peroxide once or twice a day to keep it clean and away from bacteria as much as possible until you can take her to the vet. And if I was your roommate I would pay for the vet but again not everyone acts the way we would so who knows. Your roommate probably didn't mean any harm just was careless which resulted in your kitty being injured
Avoid to give your cat any medication for humans even if the bald patch hurts those are usually extremely bad for cats.
Your furbaby will be OK I bet your roommate will never forget about the leash
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Old November 23rd, 2011, 06:59 AM
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Keep it disinfected with hydrogen peroxide morning and night applied with a cotton ball.
Not a good idea. Hydrogen peroxide does not have the disinfecting properties that it was once thought to have, and it also actually inhibits wound healing.
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Old November 23rd, 2011, 07:49 AM
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Melinda Melinda is offline
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just run to the pet store for some creme to keep it clean.
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Old November 23rd, 2011, 11:01 PM
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Originally Posted by sugarcatmom View Post
Not a good idea. Hydrogen peroxide does not have the disinfecting properties that it was once thought to have, and it also actually inhibits wound healing.
It has always worked for me
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Old November 24th, 2011, 12:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Koteburo View Post
It has always worked for me
But it is known to kill cells, so I'd still recommend against using it regularly. Couple of links on the subject:

http://www.pilonidal.org/aftercare/cleaning.php

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What you should NOT use is Alcohol or Hydrogen Peroxide. You can use either of them (diluted at 50%) for an occasional cleaning but both of these products are too harsh for daily use in healing wounds. Hydrogen Peroxide was once used for these types of wounds for its debriding ability, however, since about 1996 the course has changed and wound care specialists have come to realize that too much tissue damage occurs to healthy cells that are needed for wound healing when Hydrogen Peroxide is used. HP is considered "cytotoxic", meaning deadly to cells, thus it actually inhibits wound healing. Unfortunately, many doctors and nurses and are not informed that HP is no longer recommended for wound healing and they give their patients instructions that actually SLOW DOWN the healing process.
http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.com...2/260.full.pdf

Quote:
The topical use of disinfecting agents may also be counterproductive. Povidone- iodine, acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium hypochlorite are cytotoxic to granulating tissues and ultimately impair wound healing.
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Old November 24th, 2011, 09:32 AM
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So saline solution and/or soap
Thanks for the info.
Lots of vets still tell you to use peroxide to clean wounds from incisions, they need an update.
I bookmarked the websites.
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Old November 24th, 2011, 10:11 AM
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Myka Myka is offline
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I'm glad sugarcatmom cleared that up for you, I was relieved to read her response! Hibitane soap is great, and as far as I know it doesn't inhibit healing. It is an antiseptic chlorhexadine soap used for surgical scrubbing. It's the pink soap.
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Old November 24th, 2011, 10:13 AM
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Yikes, I was relieved to see sugarcatmom's post! Good post!

I use Hibitane soap which is a chlorhexadine antiseptic soap used for surgical scrubbing which as far as I know doesn't inhibit healing.
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Old November 24th, 2011, 11:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Myka View Post
I use Hibitane soap which is a chlorhexadine antiseptic soap used for surgical scrubbing which as far as I know doesn't inhibit healing.
Actually hibitane inhibits healing just as much as peroxide does, plus a lot of people forget to or don't know you must dilute Hibitane at least 50%.

Have a look here: Dr. Peter Dobias DVM - Healing Solution - The Wound Care Revolution Dr Dobias is a register homeopathic vet & was at one time my cat's vet
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Old November 25th, 2011, 12:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by growler~GateKeeper View Post
Actually hibitane inhibits healing just as much as peroxide does, plus a lot of people forget to or don't know you must dilute Hibitane at least 50%.

Have a look here: Dr. Peter Dobias DVM - Healing Solution - The Wound Care Revolution Dr Dobias is a register homeopathic vet & was at one time my cat's vet
Well, this is another video I'll be putting in my favorites as well :3
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Old November 25th, 2011, 09:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by growler~GateKeeper View Post
Actually hibitane inhibits healing just as much as peroxide does, plus a lot of people forget to or don't know you must dilute Hibitane at least 50%.
Serious? Well...son of a...

We used Hibitane on our horses for years. The dogs and cats would get it too. It always seemed to work well with no troubles healing. Horses are very prone to "proud flesh" and Hibitane didn't seem to cause that, in fact in some cases where the wounds are very large you want to encourage proud flesh and we were given a specific product to do that which I can't remember now.

Peroxide and iodine have been known to inhibit healing for a long, long time. I remember being quite young taking first aid classes and coming home to tell my mom about it.

Thanks for the link, but that's just an advertising video for a particular product.
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Old November 25th, 2011, 02:52 PM
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Bina Bina is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarcatmom View Post
Not a good idea. Hydrogen peroxide does not have the disinfecting properties that it was once thought to have, and it also actually inhibits wound healing.
Absolutely correct Ditch the peroxide.
For cleansing a wound you can use a sterile saline solution on a sterile gauze pad. Good Luck.
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