Go Back   Pet forum for dogs cats and humans - Pets.ca > Discussion Groups - mainly cats and dogs > General Forum for cats and dogs

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old June 1st, 2017, 07:01 PM
smg680 smg680 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Kawkawlin
Posts: 20
Why is he acting so territorial?

My family has two cats who have adopted us and come over for food. They are stray outdoor cats, affectionately nicknamed Number 2 and Number 3, and my dad made a little shelter for them for the cold weather. Ambre has never been with another cat in our house. He's been an indoor cat since he was AWOL for thee days.

A few weeks ago, he saw a strange cat, and he went NUTS! My dad was holding him and trying to calm him down (big mistake I think), but he bit and scratched him as he tried to get out to confront the intruder. Dad's doing okay now after a trip to the doctor who gave him some medicine (he had a tetanus shot earlier, so that's no problem, and Ambre is up to date on his shots, including rabies).

Why is Ambre acting like this? He even chased his own brother out a few years ago on Father's Day (shame on you treating your own brother like that!) and we're all hoping Creamy has since found a nice home since he doesn't come by anymore. Why is Ambre being so territorial?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old June 2nd, 2017, 08:14 AM
Longblades Longblades is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 2,440
I'm not sure how many cats we're talking about. Four? Ambre and Creamy are inside cats and #2 and #3 are outdoor cats? Or are Ambre and Creamy outdoor cats with nicknames of #2 and #3 and there are only two cats in total?

Maybe you could clear that up but in the meantime, it's not at all unusual for cats to be VERY territorial and if a strange cat entered the picture, either inside or outside, at least one resident cat might decide he/she has to go.

The clawing of your father is known as "redirected aggression." If they can't get to the cat who offends them cats will sometimes take out their hostility on the nearest available being, your Dad, maybe your dog, maybe even another cat they used to get along with. Breaking up hostilities with the offending cat, whether they can get to the other cat or it's just outside the window, will sometimes elicit the same reaction of redirected aggression.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old June 2nd, 2017, 07:53 PM
smg680 smg680 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Kawkawlin
Posts: 20
explanation

Ambre is the only cat my family has. Creamy, his brother, belonged to our neighbors (yes, those neighbors, the ones who owned Buddy!). Since the neighbors showed more interest in Buddy than Creamy, Creamy came over for food and attention. This continued until the Father's Day where Ambre chased him off. This was when Ambre was an indoor and outdoor cat.

A few years later, after three days of being AWOL, we decided that Ambre would become an indoor cat, and all had been quiet until this most recent winter. We were adopted by a new stray cat that we affectionately nicknamed "Number 2". My dad fixed up a feeding station for him so he could stay out of the cold and be fed all winter. A few months later, another new stray cat we affectionately nicknamed "Number 3" came along, with the same ideas as "Number 2".
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old June 3rd, 2017, 09:33 AM
marko's Avatar
marko marko is offline
Administrator - Pet lover
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Montreal Quebec Canada
Posts: 11,904
Quote:
Originally Posted by Longblades View Post

The clawing of your father is known as "redirected aggression." If they can't get to the cat who offends them cats will sometimes take out their hostility on the nearest available being, your Dad, maybe your dog, maybe even another cat they used to get along with. Breaking up hostilities with the offending cat, whether they can get to the other cat or it's just outside the window, will sometimes elicit the same reaction of redirected aggression.
100% agree with this

In addition the cat may also redirect on the owner...the don't do this on purpose, it's a reflex. Therefore family members should not take this personally.

We had an indoor cat that got out and got into fights while out. When my wife found the scared cat, the cat hissed at my wife - almost as if he didn't recognize her.

Main point is not to take this personally.

For the future, don't try to soothe a freaked out cat...let the cat calm down on its own - away from you.
__________________
Please tactfully EDUCATE or IGNORE posters you don't agree with.
Please PM me & Include URLs and post #'s for any issues and it's my pleasure to help.
I'm firm - but fair. Mind the Rules and enjoy your stay.
Newcomers FAQ - How do I post on this BB?
Pet facebook group
Check out the Pet podcast
Follow me on Twitter
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Forum Terms of Use

  • All Bulletin Board Posts are for personal/non-commercial use only.
  • Self-promotion and/or promotion in general is prohibited.
  • Debate is healthy but profane and deliberately rude posts will be deleted.
  • Posters not following the rules will be banned at the Admins' discretion.
  • Read the Full Forum Rules

Forum Details

  • Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
    Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
    vBulletin Optimisation by vB Optimise (Reduced on this page: MySQL 0%).
  • All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:09 AM.