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Old September 10th, 2014, 08:02 AM
soulnate soulnate is offline
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Brushing Duke's teeth

Hi Pets.ca

I am noticing that Duke has whitish stuff aaround teeth and gums and I have searched to discover I should be brushing his teeth. It seems wierd but makes sense at the same time but I am not to sure Duke will go for it. I want to try as Duke's breath is not always so fresh. How should I start though i don't think Duke will like this.
Thank-you
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Old September 10th, 2014, 10:16 AM
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hazelrunpack hazelrunpack is offline
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If Duke is shy about people looking in his mouth, start slowly. Don't use people toothpaste--it has too many unfriendly ingredients and too much flouride. An enzymatic toothpaste made for dogs is best and usually comes in multiple flavors. Put a thin film of his favorite flavor (you can probably get sample packs from your vet) on your finger tip and let him lick it off. Once he's tasted it, he'll be a little more comfortable with you putting it on his teeth--especially if he likes the flavor

Usually, our next step would be a finger brush. They slip on over your finger (like a thimble, only flexible and longer, with a brush near the tip), you apply some toothpaste, and then rub it gently on your dog's teeth.

Once he's okay with the finger brush, graduate to a regular tooth brush. I find the flat brushes are easiest to use. Apply a small amount of toothpaste (about the size of a pea, or two at most), then brush his teeth for as long as he'll allow. Likely you'll not be able to get the tongue-side of his teeth, but not to worry--I've been told they don't get as much build-up there, anyway. I usually angle slightly up for the top teeth and slightly down for the bottom teeth. And remember, there's a little tooth behind the last molar on top that needs attention.

Good luck! Just do the best you can--anything is better than nothing--and he may surprise you and decide he really digs the tooth-brushing thing... We have three who really like it and would let me brush for hours, 4 who tolerate it well enough, and 1 who really dislikes it but still lets me do it.
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Old September 10th, 2014, 01:32 PM
Digston Digston is offline
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If you'd like to skip the finger brush step, apply some pet toothpaste to a toothbrush (you can purchase them at vet offices and pet stores, or just pick up a baby toothbrush) and let your dog lick it off. After they are comfortable with that move to brushing. There is no need to try brushing the inside portion of the tooth, and angling the toothbrush towards the gum line at about a 45 degree angle is best. For best results, brush at least every second day. Keep in mind that brushing does not reverse dental disease. If there is already some tartar build up it would be best to bring your pet into a vet for a dental cleaning so you could start fresh.
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Old September 11th, 2014, 09:53 AM
soulnate soulnate is offline
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Thank-you for all this good information and I will repot back with my results as usual
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Old September 11th, 2014, 04:57 PM
Barkingdog Barkingdog is offline
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People never brush their dogs teeth when I was growing up and the dogs lived a full life.
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Old September 11th, 2014, 10:02 PM
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hazelrunpack hazelrunpack is offline
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They didn't when I was growing up, either, Barkingdog. Can dogs live without it? Yes. But every little bit helps, and if brushing can prevent the need for future extractions of rotting teeth, it makes sense to do it. We could really see the difference in our dogs' teeth when we started brushing them daily.
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Old September 12th, 2014, 09:39 AM
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marko marko is offline
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Quote:
People never brush their dogs teeth when I was growing up and the dogs lived a full life.
That might be true for many dogs BD, but the key words here are imo, 'full life' and can we change them to 'fuller life'.

If I had money to bet, I'd wager hard that if you took 100 dogs who live in what we'd all consider good homes whose teeth were brushed every day....
and you compare them to 100 dogs living in similar environments whose teeth were never ever brushed........ Those dogs with brushed teeth, on average will live longer and healthier lives. This is true for both humans and dogs from what I've gathered over the years. (The mouth produces some nasty bacteria and as it accumulates, it gets into the bloodstream and may cause potential health issues)

SO yup, I encourage you to try brushing dooger's teeth. Especially if he doesn't resist too badly and the stress level stays low (because stress also diminished lifespan). Anyhow that's my take and I hope it may help.
Good luck!
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  #8  
Old September 12th, 2014, 10:45 AM
Barkingdog Barkingdog is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazelrunpack View Post
They didn't when I was growing up, either, Barkingdog. Can dogs live without it? Yes. But every little bit helps, and if brushing can prevent the need for future extractions of rotting teeth, it makes sense to do it. We could really see the difference in our dogs' teeth when we started brushing them daily.
I tied brushing my standard poodle teeth but he kept trying to eat the chicken flavor toothpaste off the brush . My poor dog got cancer and brushing his teeth would not help him. I think it would be easier give a dog a beef bone to chew on . We use to be able to get for free from the butcher.
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Old September 16th, 2014, 09:44 AM
rhynes rhynes is offline
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I can just imagine trying to get a toothbrush near the girlfriends minpin, think a bloodbath would ensue.

Have you tried frozen beef or frozen raw meaty bones? Best tooth brush out there.
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Old September 19th, 2014, 05:33 AM
soulnate soulnate is offline
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So far the tooth brushing going good and Duke actually likes it and make strange faces that is funny. For member Rhynes Can you explain what you mean with that bone that acts like a toothbrush I do not understand.
Thank-you
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  #11  
Old September 19th, 2014, 08:48 AM
rhynes rhynes is offline
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I give the dogs frozen beef and pork bones, frozen poultry etc. They have to work on them and they'll spend hours on the bone after it's picked clean. Their teeth are spotless. The minpin will eat smaller rib bones, but again, he really has to work at it. Learned that trick a bunch of years ago from this forum actually.
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Old September 19th, 2014, 10:00 AM
Digston Digston is offline
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Keep in mind that bones are hard enough to cause tooth fractures, keep a close eye on them if you give bones to make sure they are not biting down directly onto the bone and check their teeth frequently.
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Old September 20th, 2014, 01:00 PM
soulnate soulnate is offline
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Thank you for the tip on the bones I will try that also with Duke and be sure to be there while he chews it. Thank you for all the really good advice.
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