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  #1  
Old September 23rd, 2008, 02:37 PM
Ilovemycocker Ilovemycocker is offline
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Doesn't pee at home but pees in other people's homes!

Hello! My 10 month old cocker spaniel never pees at my house but when I take him to somoene elses home, he pees! It's not because he has to go pee (because I always take him out for a 30 minute walk/run) before going to someone elses home. He doesn't pee large amounts, just a little dribble here and there.
How can I prevent this from happening?
Any ideas/suggestions would be very helpful!
Thanks very much!
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  #2  
Old September 23rd, 2008, 02:47 PM
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jessi76 jessi76 is offline
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is he neutered?
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Old September 23rd, 2008, 02:48 PM
Ilovemycocker Ilovemycocker is offline
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Yes, since he was 6 months.
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Old September 23rd, 2008, 03:00 PM
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jessi76 jessi76 is offline
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phew! sounds like a marking behavior to me. If it were me, I'd keep my dog on a short leash at others' homes. watch closely for any sign of squatting or leg lifting and correct it immediately. work on some other behaviors to keep focus on you i.e. sit/stay. down/stay. "on your mat" (you can bring a small towel for your dog to lay on at someone's house). I'd keep the dog tethered to you until he can be reliable in other homes. (of course, try to practice as often as possible, in homes w/out alot of carpet )
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Old September 23rd, 2008, 05:30 PM
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mollywog mollywog is offline
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it could be submissive peeing... does he seem nervous or fearful around other people? Or maybe he just gets too excited and can't control a couple dribbles from coming out... that used to happen to Molly when she was younger, every time she saw my dad, it never failed!!!
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Old September 24th, 2008, 06:50 AM
BenMax BenMax is offline
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If there is another dog in the household (or even cats) he is probably marking. Also, sometimes when dogs are nervous or out of their comfort zone this may happen until they settle.

I have a min pin that does exactly the same thing. I have to keep her tethered to me until I see that she is not sniffing frantically around and calms down. Once I know that I can trust her - the behaviour stops.

The only way to control this is to try and bring him with you as much as possible. I take my little rugrat with me even if it is a small car drive. She is now a little more confident but I keep my eyes on her to ensure that I can prevent accidents.
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Old September 24th, 2008, 05:34 PM
TwoLostSouls TwoLostSouls is offline
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Dogs don't understand the difference between inside and outside nor do they have the intuition to decipher "you can't pee here because we're in somebody's house".

Dogs usually stop relieving themselves in your house because you teach it not to. Generally they understand that the house they live in is an extension of the pack's den. That doesn't mean it will hold the same rules for everyone else's house.

Before you enter someone else's home, ensure your dog is calm and submissive. If you bring him inside while in an excited state, spot peeing will be the least of your problems. From the time before you enter, your dog must understand that this new den is "yours" and he isn't allowed to eliminate in it. This is done by asserting your ownership to the dog, like making sure it is the last to enter, keeping it on the leash and making corrections if it even sniffs something you want it to stay away from.

Don't correct your dog if you're angry or frustrated as your dog will perceive you as weak and pee where he damned well pleases.
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Old September 24th, 2008, 07:04 PM
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growler~GateKeeper growler~GateKeeper is offline
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My sister has a cocker spaniel that pees a little when excited usually when visiting at someone else's house, also if you bend over her to say hi - Like Mollywog says it's submissive peeing. She will go in the house say a very quick hi & she's immediately taken out the back to pee. If she is let out immediately there are no accidents.
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  #9  
Old September 25th, 2008, 07:43 AM
BenMax BenMax is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoLostSouls View Post
Dogs don't understand the difference between inside and outside nor do they have the intuition to decipher "you can't pee here because we're in somebody's house".

Dogs usually stop relieving themselves in your house because you teach it not to. Generally they understand that the house they live in is an extension of the pack's den. That doesn't mean it will hold the same rules for everyone else's house.

Before you enter someone else's home, ensure your dog is calm and submissive. If you bring him inside while in an excited state, spot peeing will be the least of your problems. From the time before you enter, your dog must understand that this new den is "yours" and he isn't allowed to eliminate in it. This is done by asserting your ownership to the dog, like making sure it is the last to enter, keeping it on the leash and making corrections if it even sniffs something you want it to stay away from.

Don't correct your dog if you're angry or frustrated as your dog will perceive you as weak and pee where he damned well pleases.
Very good points. Excellent.
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