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  #1  
Old August 9th, 2008, 07:33 AM
her122 her122 is offline
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chewing dog & suddent aggressive dog

OK 2 dogs with 2 different issues...

1st.
-1.5 year old golden lab.
-chews chews chews.... chews everything! couches, dressers, clothing, leather.

What is the best way to break her of this. She has her own chew toys, we keep most things up (but where do you put a dresser), she is created whenever we leave the house, but I feel bad creating her when we are sleeping cause the other dog gets to stay out and she cried most of the night when she is 'locked up' and we are home.


2nd.
-4 year old lab/newf.
-sudden aggressive behavior.

OK, so this is my baby. I have had her since she was a puppy. We have been on our own for the past 2 years. Recently started taking her to visit a friend with 2 dogs (the one mentioned above and a tri-colored boarder collie). Everything was fine, everyone got a long and played and had a good time. Now, my friend has moved to a smaller place, the collie has gone to live with the ex, and it's just the lab with him. I am usually over at his place now with my girl (cause you can't expect me to leave my baby at home!!! lol) and for the first month everything was fine. Now suddenly she is getting aggressive. She has done some serious domination acts with the lab, teeth bared, has actually gone after her. And the collie was visiting last week, and my girl went after her and the collie ended up with a slight cut inside her ear (nothing physically serious, although it seems to have done some psychological damage). I don't know what to do. She has always been a passive girl. I am scared that she is going to go after one of them and do some real physical damage one day. I don't know at what point to step in and stop it.



ANY suggestions would be greatly welcomed and appreciated, on either matter.

Thank you for taking the time to read this.
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  #2  
Old August 9th, 2008, 09:47 AM
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allymack allymack is offline
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for the chewing give lots and lots and lots of exercise, labs are very active dogs and they need as much exercise as you can give them, atleast a good 45 minute wakl a day, if you think about it, if he is only getting walked 45 mins a day he is still spending around 23 hours and 15 minutes in your house, with not too much to do.

the sudden aggression could be a sign of pain, or something wrong with the dog, s take him to the vet and get a full check up to rule out and physical problems.
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  #3  
Old August 18th, 2008, 05:53 PM
TwoLostSouls TwoLostSouls is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by her122 View Post
OK 2 dogs with 2 different issues...

1st.
-1.5 year old golden lab.
-chews chews chews.... chews everything! couches, dressers, clothing, leather.

What is the best way to break her of this. She has her own chew toys, we keep most things up (but where do you put a dresser), she is created whenever we leave the house, but I feel bad creating her when we are sleeping cause the other dog gets to stay out and she cried most of the night when she is 'locked up' and we are home.
You have to reclaim your house and the possessions in it. You have to provide you dog with limitations. You must claim your house and everything in it as yours. Your dog should never be allowed to go into any room without being invited by a human.

When your dog is chewing on an item you don't want it to, you have to put yourself between the dog and the item. If you simply grab the item and pull it away, the dog will probably assume it's a toy. You have to make the dog back away from it. You should also get used to issuing a corrective "bite" to immediately stop your dog's current activity. Imagine your hand holding a baseball. This becomes your dog bite. Firmly bite him with your hand on the side of its neck. This should be accompanied by a vocal "No" or "Hey" or "Shh" or some other sound that you make specifically when you want your dog to stop whatever it's presently doing. You must assert your dominance calmly, without emotion. Anger and frustration make you appear weak to the dog, so it will not respect you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by her122 View Post
2nd.
-4 year old lab/newf.
-sudden aggressive behavior.


OK, so this is my baby. I have had her since she was a puppy. We have been on our own for the past 2 years. Recently started taking her to visit a friend with 2 dogs (the one mentioned above and a tri-colored boarder collie). Everything was fine, everyone got a long and played and had a good time. Now, my friend has moved to a smaller place, the collie has gone to live with the ex, and it's just the lab with him. I am usually over at his place now with my girl (cause you can't expect me to leave my baby at home!!! lol) and for the first month everything was fine. Now suddenly she is getting aggressive. She has done some serious domination acts with the lab, teeth bared, has actually gone after her. And the collie was visiting last week, and my girl went after her and the collie ended up with a slight cut inside her ear (nothing physically serious, although it seems to have done some psychological damage). I don't know what to do. She has always been a passive girl. I am scared that she is going to go after one of them and do some real physical damage one day. I don't know at what point to step in and stop it.
This dog has become the pack leader. Its master must become the pack leader and show it humans are always the leaders, not the dog. Dogs are usually content to follow, but if they don't see a leader, they assume the position themselves. Aggression is usually the result. Dogs won't be aggressive if they're not the leader, they follow the leader's instructions.
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  #4  
Old August 18th, 2008, 07:08 PM
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luckypenny luckypenny is offline
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Did I hear Mr. Milan was in the house ?

Seriously now , we have an incredibly active Black Lab who has never chewed or picked up anything that wasn't one of the dogs' toys. The trick? As Allymack says, exercise, exercise, exercise. Not just physical, but mental as well. If your friend's dog is sufficiently exercised and mentally stimulated, she's less likely to chew. Also, have him give her appropriate chew toys. Stuffed frozen Kongs are a hit with most dogs .

http://www.kongcompany.com/worlds_best.html (Click on 'Tips & Advice' for some interesting stuffing ideas.)

And as for your dog, again, I think Allymack is right when she says to have her checked out at the vet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by her122 View Post
She has always been a passive girl.
Sudden and uncharacteristic aggressive behavior may be a sign that something is physically wrong.
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Old August 18th, 2008, 08:50 PM
TwoLostSouls TwoLostSouls is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luckypenny View Post
Did I hear Mr. Milan was in the house ?

Seriously now ,
Ah, so you didn't think I was serious? Everything Milan teaches works. Seems to me, that's plenty serious. Your advice of exercise and giving the dog a job is also what Milan would teach. I guess you're not as serious as you're letting on.
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Old August 18th, 2008, 08:52 PM
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allymack allymack is offline
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No need to get in a tizzy over this.

Both ways are good methods if done correctly. her122 has gotten lots of good advice from us, she can take from it what she wants and leave what she doesnt..mix it all togerther sort of thing...
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  #7  
Old August 19th, 2008, 07:26 AM
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kigndano kigndano is offline
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there is a lot of milan hate in the dog training world, he is viewed as cruel and years behind the times.

i disagree with the hate, i think his methods and ideas of body language and energy are nature at its finest.

they dont work for teaching tricks, and he knows and says that.

but for controlling a dog they work wonders.





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  #8  
Old August 19th, 2008, 07:28 AM
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kigndano kigndano is offline
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i also agree with the teeth baring being a sign of pack leadership/alpha status.

clear cut, plain and simple.

no positive trainer will agree, but its pretty much a fact.

baring teeth at another dog is a sign of "back off my space now, i run the show"

please read these links and share them with the other dog owner.

http://dogbreedinfo.com/control.htm
http://dogbreedinfo.com/topdog.htm
http://dogbreedinfo.com/topdogrules.htm
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  #9  
Old August 19th, 2008, 09:06 AM
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luckypenny luckypenny is offline
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Wouldn't that be a shame if her122's dog had a medical condition causing her pain and if it was treated with "teeth baring" and a "dog bite?"

As found first on the list of "Additional Resources & Referrals" on Ceasar Milan's website:
Quote:
Seek the advice of a trusted veterinarian to rule out any physical or neurological problems and request a referral.
http://www.cesarmillaninc.com/dpcla/referrals.php

He also states,
Quote:
If you live with an aggressive dog, I urge you to find a professional dog trainer to work with you and your dog. Most cases can be rehabilitated with time and dedication, and we owe it to our dogs to try.
The danger of watching a popular tv show is one often doesn't hear the disclaimers nor read the fine print.
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Old August 19th, 2008, 09:13 AM
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kigndano kigndano is offline
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a dog baring teeth is a sign of an aggressive dog...yes or no?


i, personally, never said to not go to a vet, i acutally encouraged it on another thread, i said to do these things AFTER medical issues were ruled out.
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  #11  
Old August 19th, 2008, 09:14 AM
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kigndano kigndano is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luckypenny View Post
Wouldn't that be a shame if her122's dog had a medical condition causing her pain and if it was treated with "teeth baring" and a "dog bite?"
who is treating with bearing teeth?

???
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  #12  
Old August 19th, 2008, 09:37 AM
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luckypenny luckypenny is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kigndano View Post
a dog baring teeth is a sign of an aggressive dog...yes or no?
A dog can bare it's teeth in play, when feeling threatened, even with submissive 'smiles' and does not necessarily mean it's an aggressive nor dominant in general.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kigndano View Post
who is treating with bearing teeth????
I misunderstood you to mean that a human could establish pack leadership through teeth baring.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kigndano View Post
i also agree with the teeth baring being a sign of pack leadership/alpha status.
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