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Old April 11th, 2006, 12:23 PM
Rick C Rick C is offline
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Leg calf Perthes in a cat

We just found out this a.m. our vet is 90% certain our two year-old cat Skyler has leg calf perthes, a very rare condition.

He's seeing a specialist on Thursday and has pain meds. He's in a lot of pain right now and largely and suddenly immobile.

He'll probably have an operation immediately with a long convalescence.

Does anyone have any links for "leg calf perthes" for cats? We'd like to read up on it.

Rick C
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Old April 11th, 2006, 03:47 PM
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I don't have any info for you, but I wanted to say that I'm sorry to hear this. I hope everything goes well.
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Old April 11th, 2006, 03:54 PM
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Aww Rick,I am sorry,this is not the kitty with no feet,is it???
I am sure someone will come up with a site for you,or maybe just Google,leg calf perthes
I have never heard of this,but I am sure you'll do everything you can to help him feel better:love:
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Old April 11th, 2006, 05:51 PM
Prin Prin is offline
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I also have never heard of it. Did the vet give you any info at all?

Chico, it's not the one with the amputated feetsies (that's Polly).
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Old April 11th, 2006, 06:09 PM
mesaana mesaana is offline
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I've never heard of this in a cat. It's a toy breed disease (toy poodles, etc). It also occurs in young humans.

If you want to search on it, it's written like this:
Legg-Calves-Perthes or Legg-Perthes

You can also search under "Avascular necrosis of the femoral head".

Good luck with your kitty.
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Old April 11th, 2006, 06:44 PM
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Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease is something more common to dogs and can occur in humans as well it is a bone disease that affects the femur head the top of the leg bone that sits in the hip socket http://www.dogstuff.info/legg_calve_...s_lanting.html

This article does mention that it can occur as a result of trauma which would explain why is is occuring in a cat
http://siriusdog.com/articles/calve-...isease-dog.htm
and surgery similiar to the type done for smaller breed with hip dysplasia, the top of the femur is cut off, so it is no longer sitting and grinding away inside the hip socket which takes away the pain and the upper thigh muscles will become overdeveloped to support the leg, the surgery is usually quite successful for smaller breeds.
You would probably be sent to an orthopedic surgeon and extra xrays may likely be done to confirm before surgery
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Old April 11th, 2006, 08:01 PM
Rick C Rick C is offline
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Skyler is the son of Polly, our two-footed rescue. Skyler is, by association, also a rescue, arriving here with Polly and five siblings scarcely a few weeks old . . . . he was the only kitten to stay with us in the end.

We'll be seeing the specialist in Calgary on Thursday morning . . . they've already got his x-rays.

Skyler is an indoor cat and hasn't had any trauma, although he injured himself with a hasty but bad jump about six months ago.

On another board where I posted this, another answer was:

. . . .and while there's debate whether this is true Legg-calf-Perthes, the result's the same. Apparently, the vet world is tying this condition to early neuter (6 months or younger) whereby the hormonal levels don't allow certain bones to close properly, making them prone to fractures and fissures.

Could be. Either way, looks like Skyler will go under the knife and hopefully come out the other side healthy.

http://www.goldentales.ca/07770157_edited-1.jpg

Rick C
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Old April 12th, 2006, 06:42 AM
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Good luck to Skyler I am sure he'll be fine,with a brave mom like Polly!!:love:
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Old April 15th, 2006, 04:54 PM
Rick C Rick C is offline
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FYI - Skyler had his operation on both hips a few days ago . . . . . back at home.

This is what he had done:

http://www.vetsurgerycentral.com/fho.htm

Full recovery is eight weeks. Stitches out in seven to ten days. He's isolated in a room but with a baby gate . . . . . he was running over to the gate to see Abby & Keeper yesterday, a little freakish to see given the equipment he lost only the day before.

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Old April 15th, 2006, 06:02 PM
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I'm glad to hear he is home safe with you. I read the link you posted, it looks very interesting. I'm glad medicine has come so far that it's able to help like this.
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Old April 15th, 2006, 09:37 PM
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Great news,good boy Skyler
I hope he's not too energetic,it must be really difficult to keep a cat/dog down if they want to get up and go.
As you know,any kitty/dog having had such an experience,deserves a pic on the Forum:love:
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Old April 15th, 2006, 10:23 PM
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Glad to hear Skyler is recovering well from his operation. Hope everything continues to go well.
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Old April 16th, 2006, 12:31 AM
Prin Prin is offline
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Those kitties (and doggies) certainly lucked out finding a home with you, Rick. I'm sure it wasn't cheap and you make no mention of the cost anywhere. Kudos to you.

I hope the recovery goes smoothly.

(Great site by the way- neat stuff on there.)
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Old April 16th, 2006, 08:03 AM
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So true Prin

Wishing Skyler an easy recovery
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  #15  
Old April 16th, 2006, 10:36 AM
Rick C Rick C is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prin
Those kitties (and doggies) certainly lucked out finding a home with you, Rick. I'm sure it wasn't cheap and you make no mention of the cost anywhere. Kudos to you.
About $3,000 . . . . . it wasn't a factor in the decision. We're fortunate that way.

As you know,any kitty/dog having had such an experience,deserves a pic on the Forum

The picture posting icon isn't appearing for me in this thread!!

Skyler in a pot at this link:

http://www.goldentales.ca/08090087_edited-1.jpg

I have some post-operation pics but my download port on my camera is on the fritz so I have to go get a CD.

Rick C
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Old October 29th, 2007, 11:54 AM
lazydiva lazydiva is offline
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Perthes

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick C View Post
About $3,000 . . . . . it wasn't a factor in the decision. We're fortunate that way.

As you know,any kitty/dog having had such an experience,deserves a pic on the Forum

The picture posting icon isn't appearing for me in this thread!!

Skyler in a pot at this link:

http://www.goldentales.ca/08090087_edited-1.jpg

I have some post-operation pics but my download port on my camera is on the fritz so I have to go get a CD.

Rick C
www.goldentales.ca
Rick,

My cat has just been diagnosed with this disease. Can you tell me how your cat has been doing since the surgery? Thanks!
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Old May 29th, 2008, 12:54 PM
Britgirl41 Britgirl41 is offline
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Limping cat

Our 2year old cat, Ole, has just been diagnosed with Legg-Calve-Perthes disease too.

How is your cat doing after surgery? It was some time ago now.
I am worried sick about Ole. It's so sad to see him hopping painfully and just lying around, when he used to be so playful and active. His sister, Lena, can't understand either!

The vet says to wait a few weeks to see if it improves on its own, before thinking about surgery.

Linda
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Old May 29th, 2008, 03:36 PM
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Britgirl,this is an old post,but Rick is on the Forum quiet a bit,I am sure if he sees your post,he will give you all the info you need for your kitty.
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Old May 29th, 2008, 04:52 PM
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Or you could PM him too.

Best of luck to you and your kitty!
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Old May 29th, 2008, 11:16 PM
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Dr Lee Dr Lee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick C View Post
On another board where I posted this, another answer was: . . . .and while there's debate whether this is true Legg-calf-Perthes, the result's the same. Apparently, the vet world is tying this condition to early neuter (6 months or younger) whereby the hormonal levels don't allow certain bones to close properly, making them prone to fractures and fissures.
I do not believe that the concerns early spay and neuter apply to Legg calf Perthes as one of the other members stated, it is also called avascular necrosis of the femoral head. This disease, while obvious involving the orthopedic system, is seen as originating of the blood supply to the bone. So to date, true legg calf Perthes has no current correlation with increased risk in early spayed or neutered dogs and cats.

One of the next podcasts will actually be on the facts and concerns of early spay and neuters and we will be addressing some of these issues. There is still controversy and honestly the clear need for further studies. However I have noted that the concerns have been directed at dogs and I have not yet heard about physeal concerns with cats, but if the controversy has not reached the felines, I am sure it will soon.

Estrogen and testosterone are 2 of the stimuli responsible for closure of physes of the long bones. Gonadectomy at any time prior to physeal closure delays the process; statistically these animals are taller than their intact counterparts. There are concerns with early spay and neuters with increased risk of: ACL tear, hip dysplasia, and physeal fracture. “NO evidence at this time links any specific age at gonadectomy with any of these conditions; the only study documenting any effect of age at gonadectomy with hip dysplasia demonstrated a possible increased incidence in bitches spayed before 5.5 months of age but worse disease in those spayed after 5.5 months of age.” - “Early Gonadectomy in Dogs & Cats” –Margaret V. Root Kustritz, DVM, PhD, Diplomate ACT, University of Minnesota. NAVC Clinician’s Brief May 2008 Pages 66-67.

Hope this helps. For this disorder, typically a FHO surgery (femoral head ostectomy) is recommended. While many cats will appear to get better, radiographically marked arthritic changes are typically noted. The FHO surgery is typically a straight forward surgery and many veterinarians feel comfortable performing this surgery. Also feline pain medication has improved by leaps and bounds over the last few years so the surgery is much, much more comfortable than before.

Good luck.
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Old June 3rd, 2008, 05:54 PM
Britgirl41 Britgirl41 is offline
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femoral head ostectomy - Perthes disease

Having had a hip replacement myself a few years ago, I know how painful and debilitating it was for a long time. It's fine now of course, but I hate to think of putting my cat through a traumatic surgery when he won't understand what's being done to him is for his long term benefit.

My vet has him on Prednisone daily, and he seems to be doing OK. Still limping, and plopping down to rest after walking, but he's still playful and affectionate.

You mentioned it is a straightforward surgery. Just how traumatic is it for the animal?
ANy advice is appreciated.
LInda
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Old June 3rd, 2008, 07:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Britgirl41 View Post
My vet has him on Prednisone daily, and he seems to be doing OK. Still limping, and plopping down to rest after walking... You mentioned it is a straightforward surgery. Just how traumatic is it for the animal?
I hope he is on Prednisolone and not prednisone. Prednisolone is much safer and effective for cats. Prednisone is not longer recommended for cats. Also there are other options other than steroids which might be safer. Cosequin is a natural supplement that comes in convenient sprinkle caps. Omega 3 fatty acids (fish oil) helps reduce arthritic inflammation and is also easy to add onto food. Many veterinarians and clients are also using Metacam for arthritis in cats. It is similar to celebrex in human medicine. It comes as a honey flavored liquid and for chronic use in a cat is administered only 2-3 times weekly. Also there is tramadol which can be used. All four of these options can be used individually or in combination to help maximize patient comfort. Cosequin and Omega 3 have virtually no side effects. Metacam should be monitored, but certainly no more than steroids. Tramadol is also very safe. Also if steroids are still the method that you choose, please avoid injectable Depo medrol and consider adding Denamarin and pepcid (famotidine) to the regimen to help against the affects of the steroids.

The FHO procedure is fairly straightforward surgery. Also, unlike a human total hip, there is NO implantation other than suture material which is used to close the wound. The surgery removed the fractured or diseased femoral head from pressing and painfully rubbing against the hip bone each time the cat moves his or her leg and allows a 'false joint' to form. Most cats and small dogs do wonderfully with this. It is not an ideal solution for dogs over 40 pounds (20kg).

I hope that helps.
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Old June 10th, 2008, 08:59 AM
Britgirl41 Britgirl41 is offline
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[QUOTE=Dr Lee;601325]I hope he is on Prednisolone and not prednisone. Prednisolone is much safer and effective for cats. Prednisone is not longer recommended for cats.


He is on Prednisone. I'll discuss options with the vet.
Thank you for your advice.
Linda
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