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Old May 14th, 2008, 01:36 PM
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Getting a new dog

Hello all:

I am new to the forum and big animals.

We have a hamster as a pet at home.

I have a 7 year old daughter and she is after me to get her a doggy for her birthday , she is particularly interested in the Husky breed. Would like to know if this breed is good with children around.

Are they costlier maintenance wise than other dogs! Any special needs! We live in a house with a backyard around 20x20 feet for pets to run around.

Thank you.

PS: My daughter wants to read the responses
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Old May 14th, 2008, 02:32 PM
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i have an 8yo daughter!! and they sure are something at that age huh?? i dont suppose you could interest her in volunteering at the shelter, getting to know one of the dogs there and adopting?? it would be for a good cause!! she would get to RESCUE a dog! they are lonely and abandoned without someone to love them best of all.

there are a great deal of costs concerning dogs. thankfully when you rescue they take care of many of them for you such as neutering them, getting them up to date on shots and starting the basics of obedience training. (lots and lots of fun for a 7yo to do!!)

perhaps you guys will find a husky there??

-ashley
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Old May 14th, 2008, 02:40 PM
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Hi, Dogs make great pets. And I"m sure a dog would be great company for your daughter and your whole family. I do agree that you need to face the fact that you will be looking after this new family member. You will be feeding it, walking it, house breaking it. The intention of a pet for your daughter is good but I have raised 3 kids and a few dogs and the kids love them and play with them , when they feel like it. Mom makes sure pup is feed , bathed, brushed ect ect.

I honestly think you would be wise to check out the shelter near you. Tell them what you want in a dog. Let them know there is children in the house. If you start with an older dog ( I don't mean 10 years old, just not a baby)you may get to miss out on the house breaking,, ( trust me it's really not a lot of fun anyways) You may end up with a pet your daughter can already take for a walk and maybe even knows sit and roll over. I am glad your not going for a tiny breed since they get hurt much easier with children. Tell them you want a non agressive dog. You don't want that hassel around your daughter. Just be really honest and know what it is you want to have in a pet.

I do hope you manage to find a new family member in the near future. A six year old cant be a responsible care giver... but they do make a great companion for them.. :-) Please write again.

Last edited by jealma; May 14th, 2008 at 03:33 PM.
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Old May 14th, 2008, 03:00 PM
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i have an 8yo daughter!! and they sure are something at that age huh?? i dont suppose you could interest her in volunteering at the shelter, getting to know one of the dogs there and adopting?? it would be for a good cause!!
this is a GREAT suggestion, especially as a first step towards getting a dog. This would have to be done with an adult though, so if your (or significant other's) schedule allows, this is a great option. it would really teach your daughter in a positive hands-on way, just how much work it is to care for a dog. Walking, playing, training, feeding, cleaning up after, etc...

another possibility would be to contact a reputable registered (and very experienced) husky breeder in your area. My mom did this when my sister was interested in brittany spaniels. They got to tour the breeders estate, meet the dogs, see how they behave, and got to ask the breeder MANY questions. This really helped them decide if this was the breed for them. Most reputable breeders are more than happy to educate others on their breed of choice, especially children who show an interest. They may also be able to recommend a Husky rescue group who you could consider adopting from.

I can't stress enough though how important it is to seek out a reputable breeder to speak to. I'm not saying you should only get a husky from a breeder - not at all - in fact, I favor adoption, ALWAYS. but a reputable breeder would be able to give you straight facts on the breed, their health, and really show you what owning one entails. from my understanding they are VERY high energy, VERY smart, and require some diligent training.

just my 2 cents. you'll get ALOT of useful info here i'm sure!
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Old May 14th, 2008, 06:50 PM
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Thank you for your replies. Yes I have tried the local animal services center and thats where we had adopted the Hamster, 2 birds and a cat, but unfortunately they do not have anything which would interest my daughter. Moreover she is looking for a puppy to grow up with as a companian. She is really good with dog puppies as one of my neighbours got a golden retreiver and she is good with it. I feel as well that the bonding would be better between her and a puppy rather than a grown dog. My 2 cents.
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Old May 14th, 2008, 07:03 PM
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Not sure where you are but there should be puppies at the shelters or rescues near you, or you could put your name in with them while you decide... The HS I go to always has puppies, they go fast, so most families pre-apply and wait. Not sure what resources are around you.

My sister has a husky, and she is an . And a rescue from the spca, a stary who's about 2. While they were looking they got in touch with some husky rescues and were assisted in finding what they wanted...

The not so good things that I know of the breed - high prey drive, not good off leash, very vocal, shedding. My sis's husk can never go off leash, always has to be on leash - no dog parks, free running at camp. Altho I see huskys at the parks, they do like to run and chase.

The good things I know are they are good with kids and great family member, they need to be included in your day to day routine, if any dog is a pack dog it's a husky. They are gentle and tolerant.

Things you have to do for them: give them a job to do - they are a working breed, they require exercise and can go forever but can be lazy if properly worked, they require a strong leader.

I love love love the breed, I didn't know much about them until we met Skye...
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Old May 14th, 2008, 07:04 PM
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Huskies are wonderful dogs but most certainly not something I would even consider for an 8 year old child. They are working breeds are not content unless they are busy. A bored husky is a dog that is digging, chewing, and looking for ways to escape from the yard. They are also a double coated breed. This means that twice a year, HUGE hunks of hair fall out.

You might consider talking to your daughter and explaining about homeless dogs at the shelter. I am fairly sure that if you explain that you will be saving a homeless dog's life, she just might find a young dog that would make a lovely companion.
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Old May 14th, 2008, 07:15 PM
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You can try www.petfinder.com. I dont recommend a husky as a first dog, especially for a young child. These are large dogs that have a very high energy level and require a lot of daily exercise and mental stimulation. If they are under exercised they can become destructive.

Take a look at petfinder as they often provide details as to the energy level and personality of the dogs, which will allow you and your daughter to pick a dog that best suites your needs and lifestyle.

Keep us updated and have fun!
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Old May 14th, 2008, 08:10 PM
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Hi we are in Brampton, Ontario. Thank you
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Old May 14th, 2008, 08:16 PM
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FYI - in petfinder you can do a search for canadian locations as well
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Old May 14th, 2008, 08:31 PM
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FYI - in petfinder you can do a search for canadian locations as well
Maybe I am doing something wrong, I tried Brampton, Ontario, Toronto, Canada but all these matches says "oops! we don't know your location"
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Old May 14th, 2008, 09:11 PM
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I just tried it (had to give it a few tries to figure it out its been a while since i last used this site):


you have to enter the city then comma then province initials:

eg. Toronto, ON
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Old May 15th, 2008, 09:05 PM
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Howdy neighbour! (I'm in elmira, ON) I currently own 2 Siberian Huskies and am competitively involved in dogsled racing. Huskies are NOT for the faint of heart. Very rarely do they fit with a first-time dog owner. Like others have said their biggest thing is they NEED a job. If you cant provide them with one then they must be thoroughly excercised to be happy calm pets. This means a minimum of 1hr fast-paced walk every day, rain, shine, blizzard, they dont care. If they are not stimulated enough (mentally and physically) they will tear your house apart, literally. They will dig, chew, masacre and destroy! LOL Also I worry about the hamster. Sibes have HIGH prey drive. Some are so high that even small dogs are fair game. Also training can be trying at times. Where a Golden Retriever will do what you ask simply because you asked them to, a Husky will stare blankly at you and ask "Why the heck should I??" Because of this and their desire to run they should never be fully trusted offleash. My red male I would never trust offleash outside of a fence. My grey male I can let offleash in certain situations, but he isnt a typical Husky either.

On the good side of things, Huskies make fantastic family pets. hey are very loving to their family and easily tolerate a lot of "abuse" from kids. My two will sit through kids poking them in the eyes or pulling on theirs ears and not let out so much as a growl (dont worry if this does happen I do immediately seperate child from dog). They love to be around people and be social which is good or bad depending on how you look at it. They are eerily smart, shockingly strong, highly dominant, independent (they like to be with people but will do their own thing while being around people LOL), mischievious, hard working, lovable creatures.

Ah yes and the shedding. HAIR EVERYWHERE!!!! Our whole upstairs is "dog free" but I still find hair all over the place during shedding season. Its on your clothes, its in your food, you just cant escape it!

But after all this why do I love my boys and the other huskies I work with?? Because their challenge is a ton of fun! They keep me on my toes. Just when I think I have them figured out they throw me for another loop LOL
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Old May 15th, 2008, 10:08 PM
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A dog is a great pet for a child who loves dogs. As mentioned above--MOM is the one who raises and trains and cleans up after and pays for replacing destroyed items plus vet visits,
Unfortunately,a husky in a 20 by 20 ft back yard is trouble. The new pup will be fine, but by 6 mths of age, a two year period of teenage attitude with OODLES of energy begins. This can be a trying time for even a very experienced owner!

A little smaller and less workaholic breed would be a much better idea, perhaps a bassett or a spaniel. A mixed breed calm dog from the shelter of about the size of a cocker spaniel/beagle would be ideal. The reasoning behind what I say? Exercise/work needs of breeds are very different. In a 20 by 20 ft yard, a husky will renovate and dig deep dens, jump or climb most fences, and kill off any lawn or plants [mostly from peeing on same] unless it only visits the yard under supervision. Honest. That will happen even with an hour walk a day unless said husky is over 4 yrs of age and a mellow individual as well.
Another idea to go with helping out at a shelter is providing a foster home for short periods of time to dogs in rescue, giving the family some dog experience, and possibly trying out a few breeds until one special dog comes along that connects with you all.
JMO hoping to help. Just have seen so many people take on more than they can handle and so many dogs ending up in shelters.
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Old May 16th, 2008, 07:11 AM
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Thank you OCspirit & Double for your informative post. Sounds for sure Huskies are a lot to maintain.

I have somewhat convinced my daughter about huskies and now the 2 more breeds are on the table. Golden Retriever or Pug. I have done some research and GR's are very friendly with children and are healthy, loving, dogs, whereas pugs are petite and often have spinal / health problems! Is that true! and yes for sure she will not go for an adult dog as we have been to 2 different shelters and lots and lots of pet stores displaying animals and my daughter is more interested into babies rather than a grown dog. Am stalling her giving some reason or the other until I am sure, I don't want the poor animal to go to a shelter within a few months as it bit or scratched my baby.

Huskies for sure would be out due to the aggressiveness drive built in them, nor she would like to loose her pet hamster rolling in the ball!
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Old May 16th, 2008, 08:02 AM
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I don't want to offend you but 7 seems a little young to have so much input into a very big decision. You took your daughter to two shelters and her heart didn't melt for even one dog?
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Old May 16th, 2008, 08:25 AM
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I know somebody who has a husky and the issues he has with his dog are the same as what everybody mentioned. His husky takes huge amounts of time and is not a dog for a young child unless mom or dad are going to take on responsibility of it.

I also work with somebody who has a few Alaskan Huskies who are sled dogs and are run every day. Very experienced owners who can't trust their dogs off leash and do not recommend them for first time owners.

This should be a dog that YOU want as you will be the primary care giver to the dog for 10-15 years. Want4rain has an excellent idea of going to the shelter. Get to know the dogs, different breeds, and then make your decision.
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Old May 16th, 2008, 08:56 AM
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Mom - remember that puppies do not come house broken, nip and play rough until taught otherwise. This is going to be a lot of work for YOU and I can promise you that after a couple of weeks of a puppy nipping at your daughter - she will be well tired of it. (I know this because my son - who has been around dogs of all sizes since he was born - was sick and tired of our pom puppy when he was 7.)

Please avoid petshops. ALL petshops, regardless of what they say, get their puppies from commercial breeders who are more concerned with the money in their pocket then the health of the puppy you buy. The chances of getting a pup that looks healthy when you purchase it but has major health issues as it becomes older increase expotentially when you purchase from a pet store.

A dog is something you are going to have for years to come. If you take your time you have a marvelous chance to teach your young child some life lessons and save a life by keeping your eye on the nearest shelter.
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Old May 16th, 2008, 11:20 AM
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I think Want4rain has a great idea getting you child into volunteering will help her to realize all the work and responsibility of owning a pet. I grew up with dogs and thank my parents for giving me the opportunity to learn and care for our dogs. It taught me a lot about caring and responsibility.
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Old May 16th, 2008, 11:40 AM
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I have done some research and GR's are very friendly with children and are healthy,
Healthy ? GR ? Excuse me but , nope. Thanks to BYB , goldens have now many health issues. You may have to spend more on food because of allergies and prepare yourself you may have to go to the vet A LOT. All of my 3 goldens costed me a bundle on vet cares. 2 out of 3 have allergies , 2 out of 3 got cancer ....

Not saying all goldens , but a lot of them , thanks to BYB who fu**** up the race.
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Old May 16th, 2008, 12:03 PM
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I think Pugs are a wonderful 1st dog, especially if you want your daughter to be very involved in the process. They are smaller and therefore easier to handle for a child; they also require less exercise then either a Husky or a Golden Retriever.
Goldens are absolutely wonderful dogs but keep in mind that they are large dogs with high energy levels. Both breeds are very good family dogs and you cannot tell in advance which will have more health problems.

You should evaluate your family’s lifestyle to decide what suites your entire family best. Just make sure you go either through a rescue organization or a reputable breeder.

Oh and I HIGHLY recommend that you and your daughter take your new dog to puppy classes where your daughter can learn a lot about training and handling a dog!!

Enjoy!
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Old May 17th, 2008, 07:49 PM
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Hi there! My grandma has been breeding huskies for 30 years, She knows everything you need to know about them, She has malamutes, Siberian and Samoyed (I have a samoyed from her, not only is she beutiful but smart and very eager to please) I can assure you she is NOT just a BYB. They are raised in a family enviroment and come with needles and are hip certified, ckc and akc registered.They are tattooed and microchipped before they leave. They are sold as pets and a select few are sold as show dogs. She has puppies and sometimes she has older dogs for sale if thats what you are looking for. If you want one i could put in a good word for you, She doesnt sell unless she meets you and you come the dog in person but i may be able to talk her into shipping one up as long as you talk to her for a couple of days so she can get to know you and know you are a good person. If you are interested tell me and i'll ask her, if not im here if you have ANY questions i will ask her about it..Ill even show you a picture of my puppy.
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Old May 17th, 2008, 08:07 PM
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Hi there! My grandma has been breeding huskies for 30 years, She knows everything you need to know about them, She has malamutes, Siberian and Samoyed (I have a samoyed from her, not only is she beutiful but smart and very eager to please) I can assure you she is NOT just a BYB. They are raised in a family enviroment and come with needles and are hip certified, ckc and akc registered.They are tattooed and microchipped before they leave. They are sold as pets and a select few are sold as show dogs. She has puppies and sometimes she has older dogs for sale if thats what you are looking for. If you want one i could put in a good word for you, She doesnt sell unless she meets you and you come the dog in person but i may be able to talk her into shipping one up as long as you talk to her for a couple of days so she can get to know you and know you are a good person. If you are interested tell me and i'll ask her, if not im here if you have ANY questions i will ask her about it..Ill even show you a picture of my puppy.
Would your Grandmother recommend the breed for an 8 year old child? Or a first time dog owner?

What would your Grandmother say are the negative aspects of owning the breed?
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Old May 18th, 2008, 08:31 AM
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On a personal note, My brother was 8 years old when he got his first husky, It was his first dog and it worked out perfectly! The dog was loyal to him and was his personal protection!And My grandma says that your never to young to have a husky, or anyother breed of dog for that matter. As lond as the dog is taught to be gentle and as long as the child has boundaries set and is taught not to yank on the dog or anything like that it should be fine. Huskies are gentle creatures when taught right. And a first time dog owner would be lucky to have a husky as a pet, As long as you Read up on them and maybe some professional training. But you mucst know your stuff! She says that the only negative thing she has to say aboutt hem is that they have to eat alot, and they are very vocal animals. She says that she would recomend a samoyed for a child more so than anyother.



I think that maybe you could look into a emerican eskimo dog, a miniature one, They look kinda like huskies but are smaller and maybe better for a child. Just a suggestion! Keep us updated!!

Last edited by katherine93; May 18th, 2008 at 08:33 AM.
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Old May 18th, 2008, 08:37 AM
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I think, though, Katherine, having your mom who is so knowledgeable about huskies really helped your brother. However for 1st time dog owners, this may not be the best breed. Ask your mom and let us know what she says. Also, this person only has a 20 by 20 backyard, hardly enough room for a large dog.
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Old May 18th, 2008, 08:41 AM
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emerican eskimo! And my dog Jesse! Sorry the picture is small because i had to resize and everything for it to fit!
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Old May 18th, 2008, 08:42 AM
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Oh they are absolutely stunning.
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Old May 18th, 2008, 08:45 AM
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I think, though, Katherine, having your mom who is so knowledgeable about huskies really helped your brother. However for 1st time dog owners, this may not be the best breed. Ask your mom and let us know what she says. Also, this person only has a 20 by 20 backyard, hardly enough room for a large dog.
Oops didnt see the part about a 20 x 20 backyard.. We have acres of land so that was better for the husky my bro had! maybe a husky is the wrong way to go, Jesse would go crazy if cooped up all day like that!

Im kinda both ways on this one! I would look into a american eskimo dog!
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Old May 18th, 2008, 10:40 AM
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These links have a ton of info for you, rana, on how to choose a dog and how to prepare for bringing one into your life: http://www.dogstardaily.com/training...uppy-education
http://www.dogstardaily.com/training...-or-pure-breed

I strongly urge you to thoroughly read those and all the other links there, the advice is very valuable. Good luck with your quest!
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Old May 18th, 2008, 05:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katherine93 View Post
On a personal note, My brother was 8 years old when he got his first husky, It was his first dog and it worked out perfectly! The dog was loyal to him and was his personal protection!And My grandma says that your never to young to have a husky, or anyother breed of dog for that matter. As lond as the dog is taught to be gentle and as long as the child has boundaries set and is taught not to yank on the dog or anything like that it should be fine. Huskies are gentle creatures when taught right. And a first time dog owner would be lucky to have a husky as a pet, As long as you Read up on them and maybe some professional training. But you mucst know your stuff! She says that the only negative thing she has to say aboutt hem is that they have to eat alot, and they are very vocal animals. She says that she would recomend a samoyed for a child more so than anyother.

I think that maybe you could look into a emerican eskimo dog, a miniature one, They look kinda like huskies but are smaller and maybe better for a child. Just a suggestion! Keep us updated!!
Hmmm.

I love rottweilers. I know many of them and have had more then one in my home over the years. I think they have many, many wonderful qualities and my son's (he is now 10 years old) very first dog was a rottweiler - she was his best friend and his protector.

I would never, ever in a million years recommend the breed to someone I didn't know or a first time dog owner. Or as a dog for an 8 year old child.

According to the AKC breed standard (I am an American, so I go by AKC as opposed to CKC) Huskies range from 20" to 23" and weigh between 35 and 60 pounds. That is more dog than my very experienced 10 year old would be allowed to handle, and certainly way too much dog for the inexperienced 8 year old.

According to the Siberian Husky Club of America, husky's dig, run and shed a tremendous amount of fur. They are also happiest in a pack - be it human or dog and they are extremely friendly. The SHCA is the largest supporter of the breed in the U.S. and even they are willing to acknowledge that the breed has shortcomings beyond how much they eat and the fact that they are vocal.

Please, before whole-heartedly recommending a breed to someone you don't know, or don't know much about - please consider the whole picture. There are so very many pure bred dogs in shelters across North America that were bought with the best intentions on recommendations from friends or people on line (or even just a cute picture that was seen online) and the puppies were just too much for the new owner to handle, or too big, or too hairy.
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