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Old September 5th, 2007, 11:16 AM
fedogline fedogline is offline
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Exclamation Falling tooth - please help...

I realized my 1.5 years old cat has a falling tooth in her upper jaw (an incisor next to canine). The gum above the falling tooth is red and it looked like the root was pulled down somehow.

I took her to a vet the other day, and she told me that probably there was some sort of trauma on the tooth, as other teeth as well as her gum in general is in good shape. The vet told me that we can either pull the teeth out now or let it fall down on its own.

Wouldn't that cause inconvenience of uncomfortableness for the cat if she looses her tooth, even if it's not a large one? Is there any way that we can salvage the falling tooth? Or any advice or suggestions? The cat's too young to lose her teeth, even just one! She already had enough miserly as a kitten and I don't want her to go through any more pain. Please help...

Last edited by fedogline; September 5th, 2007 at 11:18 AM.
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Old September 5th, 2007, 11:22 AM
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mummummum mummummum is offline
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Your cat is likely in quite a bit of pain and you are risking infection (if the inflammed area isn't already showing infection) to her gums, jaw bone and other tooth cavities. I would get the tooth pulled asap. If you can see the root, there is no way to save the tooth.
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Old September 5th, 2007, 11:49 AM
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Love4himies Love4himies is offline
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I would get the tooth pulled as soon as you can. Mouth infections can get very serious and she must be in enormous amount of pain.
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Old September 6th, 2007, 03:42 AM
fedogline fedogline is offline
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The vet says we should wait...

Thanks for your reply!

The doctor told me that, with 80% chance, the tooth will natually fall off within several weeks. She said she'll wait for another six weeks, and if the tooth does not fall off, then she'll do the surgery. The reasons for this wait is that she wants to avoid administering anaesthetic.

The cat does not seem to be in pain (although I cannot tell), she is eating and playing as normal.

Do you guys agree with what the vet is saying, or do you think I should get a second opinion from another doc?
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Old September 6th, 2007, 04:53 AM
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badger badger is offline
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If your cat is healthy, why does your vet want to avoid an anaesthetic? Even if she doesn't see any infection now, a loose tooth is much more likely to become infected, that would be my only reservation. Plus cats are very good at hiding pain so it may be causing her problems, even if she is behaving normally. Keep a close eye on her. If you notice any change - reluctance to eat, drooling, fever or hiding - back to the vet.
Don't worry about the cat losing it in the end, I have cats who have lost teeth and they manage fine.
But I'd still ask the vet about the anaesthetic. There must be a reason.

Last edited by badger; September 6th, 2007 at 04:56 AM.
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Old September 6th, 2007, 07:48 AM
fedogline fedogline is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badger View Post
If your cat is healthy, why does your vet want to avoid an anaesthetic? But I'd still ask the vet about the anaesthetic. There must be a reason.
She said she wants to avoid it when she can as it is not risk-free. She says she'll wait for six weeks as the tooth will probably fall out by then. But six weeks may be too long...
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Old September 6th, 2007, 09:25 AM
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mummummum mummummum is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fedogline View Post
Do you guys agree with what the vet is saying, or do you think I should get a second opinion from another doc?
I think it's pretty clear we disagree and are suggesting that the tooth be pulled asap to prevent infection from setting in.
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Old September 6th, 2007, 10:19 AM
fedogline fedogline is offline
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Thank you, all. I think you guys made me realize that I need to go to another doc for second opinion. Thanks a lot.
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  #9  
Old September 6th, 2007, 11:15 AM
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KeeKee's Mommy KeeKee's Mommy is offline
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Tests prior to removal of teeth

I am glad you have chosen to see another vet. Here's my experience with tooth extraction:

I have two cats, one of which has undergone surgery twice for tooth extraction. She was injured in our home, and the tooth got infected, so our vet put her on antibiotics. A few weeks later, she had the surgery and other teeth were extracted as well. The vet said they were cracked, broken, or had been infected as well as the first one we were aware of. She came out of the surgery very groggy, sad, and clingy. She noticably improved in 24 hours and within 5 days, was back to being herself, except for a prolonged period of clingyness.

About four years later, at one of her check-ups, the vet noticed she had more teeth that needed to come out, and because of her age, about 9 years old, he administered tests that analyze enzymes of some sort, regarding her liver, to make sure what level any infection was at, and if she could go forward with surgery and be okay with being put under. Tests came out okay, and surgery was completed. Once again, she very groggy, sad, and clingy. and noticably improved in 24 hours and within 5 days, was back to being herself, except for a prolonged period of clingyness.

The vet commented that her losing teeth is a part of heredity, breed, certainly nothing we did or did not do. We have always made brushing teeth a focus of the grooming of our animals. Our vet also said because she was losing molars in the back, the gums will stiffen and she will still chew her food with tougher gums, than not chew at all. This cat, Spatty, a strong female, neutered, eats normally, doesn't have a weight problem, and is quite active and frisky for a gal her age.

I wouldn't hesitate to get the tooth extracted. Seems to me the vet should be proactively giving your kitty an antibiotic, for the redness and swelling which could be a sign of not only trama, but infection as well. I would not let the tooth just hang there. Seems to me that would be uncomfortable and painful...just ripping away from the gum bit by bit, with each meal, isn't nice for kitty. Kitty should be alright after surgery. Don't worry, just plan to be there, and stroke her while she sleeps. She'll need you so don't leave her alone, and offer her a lot of comfort and love.
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