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  #1  
Old January 13th, 2007, 08:49 PM
t.pettet t.pettet is offline
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30 gal

Have recently upgraded to a 30 gal and have 3 adult guppies, about 12 young ones and a few fry, also 2 catfish. With the rate that these guys are reproducing how many can I safely keep in this size tank. Maybe I should start sending some of the teenagers to the pet shop?
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Old January 13th, 2007, 09:51 PM
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please spay and neuter your pets
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Old January 14th, 2007, 03:47 AM
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What kind of catfish?
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Old January 14th, 2007, 11:38 PM
t.pettet t.pettet is offline
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30 gal.

Maybe I could get some fish birth control! The catfish are called peppered, they're always together, swimming, eating but quite shy when anyone approaches the tank.
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Old January 15th, 2007, 12:04 AM
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http://www.brooklands.co.nz/tropical/paleatus.htm Like that?

You're probably fine for now as far as fish load, assuming your tank has a 30 gallon rated filter or more.
Depending on whether or not you have lots of filtration you could keep a several more guppies, they don't really require a massive amount of room or anything.
As long as your bioload isn't larger than your filtration system you'll be ok, but that's impossible to know without knowing the size of your filter and what type it is.
Assuming you just have a normal amount of filtration I wouldn't keep more than a few extra guppies than you have now, you could easily become overloaded in a 30. Do you know for sure how many fry you have? If there are plants they will hide, and often well. We thought we only had one left in our feeder tank and there ended up being around a dozen
You'd probably have more fry but guppies will often eat them. I'd sell some anyway just because I personally wouldn't want a huge tankful of guppies.

Last edited by MyBirdIsEvil; January 15th, 2007 at 12:28 AM.
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Old January 15th, 2007, 12:21 AM
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A good forum with lots of knowledgeable people is http://www.aquariacentral.com/forums/index.php, if you want to post the specs on your aquarium and ask about it. You'll end up with a much healthier aquarium if you get opinions from several different hobbyists rather than the couple you may get on here.
Honestly I would be lying if I told you a definitive yes or no answer on whether or not you have too many fish because without knowing the size/type of filtration there is no way to answer that.
As far as room you have plenty, as far as bioload it depends on your equipment and maintenence.
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Old January 17th, 2007, 10:51 PM
t.pettet t.pettet is offline
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30 gal

My research has yielded that 1 gal./per fish is acceptable space with the specs I have so once I reach that amount will take some of the younger ones to the pet shop. Thanks for your replies.
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Old January 18th, 2007, 02:02 PM
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Hi there,
actually the rule is 1 gallon per 1 inch of adult fish.
So if you have 20, 2 inch fish, they will need 40 gallons
of space.
Generally speaking this rule works with small fish like
guppies and platys, neons, etc.
For guppies, I would say 15 adult guppies in a 30g tank would
be the absolute maximum.

Also, your pepper cory cats are schooling fish, the reason they
seem timid is because they need to be in a group of 5 or more
of their own kind (not just a group of mixed corys).

What I would recommend personally, is increasing your group
of cory cats to 5.
Then get some kind of "centerpeice" fish that will keep the guppy
fry population in check.
So say you had,
5 Corydoras Paleatus
10 Adult Guppies (6 female 4 male or all male)

Then you could add something like:
1 Pair (m/f) of Keyhole Cichlids or
Dwarf Gourami or
Bolivian Ram / Blue ram or
Trio of Boesmani, Irian Red, Turqoise, or similar Rainbowfish,
etc.
Any of these fish will devour newborn fry, maintaining the
guppy population at a stable level, and would compliment
the tank nicely.

5 Cory Cats
10 Adult guppies
2-3 of some centerpeice fish

Thats max stocking there.

Some really good forums:
www.fishprofiles.com
www.petfish.net
www.ultimatebettas.com

All these sites have sections for individual fish, and thousands
of knowledgeable and experiences fish keepers.
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Old January 18th, 2007, 11:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by t.pettet View Post
My research has yielded that 1 gal./per fish is acceptable space with the specs I have so once I reach that amount will take some of the younger ones to the pet shop. Thanks for your replies.
1 in. of adult fish per gal is too much for most tanks. I don't know what kind of filtration you have, so I'm just saying in general.

If you get dwarf gouramis as Sneaky suggested, I would go with females.

Though males are more colorful and the most common they tend to harrass other fish and may kill your guppies. They're a lot like bettas in their behavior.
You can't keep males with females unless the females number 5 or more, even then they sometimes signle one out to mess with. When kept with one female they'll often harrass her until she dies or goes into hiding.

Rams would personally be my pick as community fish. They can be extremely colorful and are peaceful towards tankmates. They would keep your fry population down but most likely ignore the adult guppies.

Last edited by MyBirdIsEvil; January 18th, 2007 at 11:15 PM.
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  #10  
Old January 19th, 2007, 12:50 AM
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Sneaky Sneaky is offline
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dwarf gouramis are usually very peaceful fish.
I kept them for several years, 1 m 1 female in a 10g with 5 guppies
and 3 females and 2 males in my 90 gallon.
They never killed any fish and never had problems with the genders.
They are often kept in pairs or groups.
I would av oid mixing them with bettas though, as bettas will often try to
kill them and usually succeed. I would also avoid male bettas with guppies.
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Old January 20th, 2007, 12:33 AM
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Many people have had the opposite experience which is why I don't recommend they be kept together.
Personally I had a male kill a female after they were living happily in a 29 gallon for several days.
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Old January 20th, 2007, 03:16 PM
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Mybird,
thats very unusual and I assure you it is not the norm
in dwarf gourami behaviour.
I could post you about 50+ links that state keeping them in
groups of mixed sex is fine.
However, just like any kind of animal, there are always exceptions
to the rule.
Yours is that exception.
In a similar situation, I know at least a dozen people who keep pencilfish, a small, peaceful schooling fish.
Always peaceful, always calm, never aggressive towards each other
or other fish. But I have one friend who had a pencilfish go crazy and
it killed all the other pencils and a couple of tetras too. It just shows how just like us humans, animals vary in personality from individual to individual.
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Old January 20th, 2007, 09:21 PM
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MyBirdIsEvil MyBirdIsEvil is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sneaky View Post
Mybird,
thats very unusual and I assure you it is not the norm
in dwarf gourami behaviour.
I could post you about 50+ links that state keeping them in
groups of mixed sex is fine.
However, just like any kind of animal, there are always exceptions
to the rule.
Yours is that exception.
In a similar situation, I know at least a dozen people who keep pencilfish, a small, peaceful schooling fish.
Always peaceful, always calm, never aggressive towards each other
or other fish. But I have one friend who had a pencilfish go crazy and
it killed all the other pencils and a couple of tetras too. It just shows how just like us humans, animals vary in personality from individual to individual.

I could post you 50 links that say irridescent sharks get to 12 inches in length too, it doesn't mean that's correct.
Just because websites say something doesn't make it true, they tend to copy information from each other.

I've had a dojo kill a corycat which I'll admit is completely out of the norm, but a male dwarf gourami being aggressive with his own species is extremely common, and aggression towards tankmates isn't unheard of, especially with smaller colorful fish.

I find this an apt description:
Quote:
Behaviour
Dwarf gouramis are peaceful fish with other aquarium inhabitants, but can be extremely aggressive with their own kind. In a crowded aquarium, such as in a shop, the males have not got enough room to establish territories of their own, and bad behaviour is minimised. If there are only a few, however, they will divide up the aquarium and weaker males may be bullied. They are also wife-beaters, and the females need room to escape the males when they are not ready for spawning and as soon as spawning has taken place.
http://www.tropicalfishfinder.co.uk/...tail.asp?id=25

They're also extremely overbred/inbred/poorly bred even compared to many other popular fish, so they tend to have health problems if you don't get them from a good source.
I guess this could depend on locality, but in the U.S it is true, and in Canada many of them probably come from the same source.

What do you mean by pencilfish? There are several species by that common name, do you have a scientific name?

Last edited by MyBirdIsEvil; January 20th, 2007 at 11:01 PM. Reason: Too vague
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  #14  
Old January 21st, 2007, 04:32 PM
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Sneaky Sneaky is offline
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Yes, just as you could post 50 links stating
dwarf gouramis are aggressive, I too could post that or
even double that saying that they are well suitable to put
into groups.

Pencilfish the ones I am speaking of are beckfords pencilfish .
Nannostomus Beckfordi - also known as the golden pencil,
dwarf pencil, and a few other common names.

The websites you keep putting up are not what I would consider
the best out there, there are many others that are much much
better.
And better yet, go to a fish forum (not linked to a sales site),
and you can ask for personal experience.
www.petfish.net
has over 3000 members, post there and ask for
peoples experiences on keeping dwarf gouramis, I assure you your
experience is not the norm.

Also - dojo loaches dont even have the equipment for killing other fish.
Are you sure the fish just didnt die of some other cause and you
are blaming it on the dojo?
Ive got 3 of them and they dont even eat live guppy fry, let alone
harm or injure other fish. Its not even possible - they dont even
have teeth.
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  #15  
Old January 22nd, 2007, 12:26 AM
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MyBirdIsEvil MyBirdIsEvil is offline
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Quote:
Also - dojo loaches dont even have the equipment for killing other fish.
Are you sure the fish just didnt die of some other cause and you
are blaming it on the dojo?
Yes, I saw it happen. He also likes eating ghost shrimp, it's one of his favorite snacks.
They're scavengers and will also eat fish that are freshly dead, so they definately have the "equipment". They sometimes like to eat snails too, though mine pays absolutely no attention to them.
I don't think they have enough force to bite through bone, but definately enough to rip flesh and remove scales.
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