Go Back   Pet forum for dogs cats and humans - Pets.ca > Discussion Groups - mainly cats and dogs > Dog training - dog behavior

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old December 7th, 2006, 04:09 PM
Aimster's Avatar
Aimster Aimster is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Edmonton, AB
Posts: 125
Biting/Nipping Puppy

We just got our new puppy, Moxy, from the local shelter. She is mostly well behaved for a 3-4 month old puppy that probably had a bad owner from birth. But when she gets playful she bites or rather grabs ahold of our hands and won't let go and because she has sharp puppy teeth it's rather painful. We've been trying to get our hands out and substitute them with a toy right away and then correcting her. It seems to be ineffective at the moment. She also likes to turn and bite my legs when I'm walking her, she'll jump and bite and get won't stop until I pull on the leash to hold her back from my body.

Any suggestions on how she can be trained out of the biting while playing?
__________________
"Until one has loved an animal, a part of ones soul remains unawakened."
Anatole France

Proud Parent of:
Kip - Female, DSH Cat
Moxy - Female, Lab Cross
Dagan - Male, Husky/Malamute Cross
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old December 7th, 2006, 05:15 PM
TeriM's Avatar
TeriM TeriM is offline
Live well, laugh often
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: North Vancouver, BC
Posts: 9,757
Welcome to puppyhood! You could try a sharp "yipe" or "ouch" every time she makes contact with your skin. With some dogs that is enough to stop them. I gave my pup two trys and then if he went for a third I would calmly take him and put him in his crate (or other confined area away from you) for a time-out. They quickly figure out that the behavoir results in the loss of your attention.

If she is doing it while on leash I would suggest the same theory but instead step on the leash so that she can sit but cannot move around and tell her to wait or settle. She will likely bounce and struggle and then give up and look at you. When she is quiet then you can begin to move forward again.

If possible also give her some playtime with other well socialized/non-aggressive dogs. That is how they learn to control their bite as the other dogs will definately let them know it is unacceptable behavoir.
__________________
"Never doubt that a small, group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has." - Margaret Mead
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old December 7th, 2006, 06:59 PM
rainbow's Avatar
rainbow rainbow is offline
-
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Beautiful BC's Kootenay Country
Posts: 34,757
I agree with TeriM's advice. The "ouch" in a high pitched voice worked for me. And, yes, welcome to puppyhood.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old December 7th, 2006, 07:03 PM
TeriM's Avatar
TeriM TeriM is offline
Live well, laugh often
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: North Vancouver, BC
Posts: 9,757
Good point Rainbow. The yipe or ouch should be high pitched kinda like a dog would do if it was yiping.
__________________
"Never doubt that a small, group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has." - Margaret Mead
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Forum Terms of Use

  • All Bulletin Board Posts are for personal/non-commercial use only.
  • Self-promotion and/or promotion in general is prohibited.
  • Debate is healthy but profane and deliberately rude posts will be deleted.
  • Posters not following the rules will be banned at the Admins' discretion.
  • Read the Full Forum Rules

Forum Details

  • Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
    Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
    vBulletin Optimisation by vB Optimise (Reduced on this page: MySQL 0%).
  • All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:01 PM.