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Old August 5th, 2006, 01:59 PM
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Prolem with Tomatoes grown in Pots

I have two large pots with two tomato plants in each. Three of the plants are italian tomato plants. Firstly, let me say that this is the first time 've tried growing vegetables in pots and will openly admit that they probably don't get as much water as they should (though I'm getting better).

Anyway here's the problem, I find that almost 1/4 of the tomatoes are roting from the botom (opposite side as theone that's attached ot the plant) and I've been picking them off the plant so it can use its energy to grow the nice tomatoes instead. Does anyone know what's causing the rotting? Is it the lack of water?

Plus, the soil is new and was mixed with sheep dung, all of which was bought at Rhona in the spring.
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Old August 5th, 2006, 04:29 PM
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Can you replant them in a garden with new soil - and buy some fertilizer to help them grow? Tomatoes need lots of water and sun and balk when they don't get it (I am not the best gardener - I defer to my mom for that and she grows tomatoes in pots and replants them in her garden.) I have some in very large pots on my deck. Tomatoes also like lots of room to grow so maybe the pots are too small??
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Old August 5th, 2006, 05:27 PM
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It's a tomato disease that's causing that.

i did a search and it says it has to do with watering and extreme heat. SO you have to water regularly! And maybe move the plants where they get shade in the morning and then sun from noon and on. ANd you have to water in the afternoon, because if you water during the day, because of the heat that may damage the plant and cause impalance. Because of the heat, when you water when the sun's strong the water evaporates and they don't get enough water.


hope that solves the problem
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Old August 5th, 2006, 08:20 PM
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Oh bother, who knew this would be so hard. I had a huge garden patch at my parent's house, but here in the City I don't have much yard, and Charley does love his yard, so I put the plants in large pots (18" or so) on the driveway against a north-west facing wall. The plants only get direct sunlight in the afternoon, from about 13:00 to 18:00 ... I have been trying to water them more often, in the morning on my way to work. So maybe its just too warm during the day, or maybe the damage was caused before I was more diligent about the water. Ideas?!
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Old August 5th, 2006, 08:45 PM
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The term often used is dry rot

her is some info about

http://www.gardenline.usask.ca/veg/blossom.html
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Old August 5th, 2006, 08:52 PM
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I'll just tell you right now that tomatoes do NOT do well in pots. Tomatoes are hardy plants, but unless you have experience with growing them in pots they do terrible a lot of the time because they don't get the right amount of nutrients, the soil isn't correctly drained, etc..
If you can, I would try relocating them to the ground somewhere.
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Old August 8th, 2006, 06:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OntarioGreys
The term often used is dry rot

her is some info about

http://www.gardenline.usask.ca/veg/blossom.html
Describes them perfectly... I'm looking into a timer for the tap, it'll be more reliable than me!
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Old August 8th, 2006, 06:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBirdIsEvil
Tomatoes are hardy plants, but unless you have experience with growing them in pots they do terrible a lot of the time because they don't get the right amount of nutrients, the soil isn't correctly drained, etc..
If you can, I would try relocating them to the ground somewhere.
There's no-where else to put them really, the yard just isn't big enough. I wonder how many years it'll take to aquire the 'experience' . The nutrients are good, I garden enough to know that, and the soil is well drained, so I'm thinking its more to do with the moisture and maybe growing too fast (they were a little root bound when I planted them)
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Old August 31st, 2006, 09:09 PM
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experienced tomato grower

I work in a greenhouse and have been gardening for almost 40 yrs.
Blossom end rot is what you'e got and there is a very simple, cheap, easy way to fix it....for next year....Save your egg shells.. Rinse and keep them and next year, add a lot of them to the soil crushed up when you plant those tomatoes.
The bigger the pot, the bigger the tomato. You also can't overwater tomatoes...regardless of what others tell you. Water in the am before 10 and after 5pm. They prefer full sun.
Tomatoes are heavy feeders. That means they need a lot of food to produce well. An organic fertilizer or rotted maure or rich compost re-applied about monthly will do wonders!
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Old September 6th, 2006, 07:28 PM
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My experience has been that consistent watering is critical. Inconsistent watering contributes to splitting (which invites pests, fungus and rot) and to generally weak plants.

I do a lot of container gardening, and I can tell you the easiest thing is to set up a drip system on a timer. It's really VERY simple, and I'd be happy to give guidance if needed. This eliminates overhead watering--never good--and maintains consistent watering. I do 7 minutes early morning and evening when it's hot, and my containers have been very happy for years.

One other thing, I can almost guarantee that no pot is big enough for two tomato plants once they're mature. Try limiting to one of your favorites next year and you'll be more likely to be rewarded with a big, healthy yield. -kb
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Old September 6th, 2006, 09:45 PM
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Vaguely off topic here...but...

I read the thread title as "Problem with tomatoes grown in POT" not pots....

Hmmm....

I swear nothing's on my mind...really!

lol

Sorry I have nothing interesting to add otherwise....

Megan
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