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  #31  
Old October 3rd, 2005, 11:12 PM
LoNScamp LoNScamp is offline
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My observations have been that dogs giving up something is more the exception than the rule, particularly outside and if there are other dogs around.
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  #32  
Old October 6th, 2005, 03:04 PM
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Personally I have never understood why humans would want to be able to disturb a dogs meal! I NEVER bother my dogs when they are eating ever, I wouldn't appreciate someone reaching onto my place and I too would probably bite someone! Now toys, bones, something that could potentially be dangerous, sure but you can teach them leave it or drop it for that. I don't free feed or have kids so it's not really an issue in my home but I do beleive it's kinder/safer to just let the dog eat. My dog was food aggressive when I adopted him, I did nothing, just left him alone and we have no issue with him today IF for some silly reason I would want to stick my hand in his bowl.
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  #33  
Old October 6th, 2005, 03:20 PM
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I believe that all dogs should be prepared for any possible circumstances that could cause an incident.
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  #34  
Old October 6th, 2005, 11:01 PM
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Just thought I would give a quick update to Tosa's food aggression. Since I posted I have been using the steps explained by Tenderfoot. I'm happy to say she is getting much better. She rarely gives even the slightest hint of aggression anymore. I am almost at the point where I can trust her to have her food all to herself without me testing her. I can also see the respect for my word growing every day. Thanks for all of your suggestions.
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  #35  
Old October 6th, 2005, 11:05 PM
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Even if you lay off a bit I would still do it one or two times a week for a little longer.
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  #36  
Old October 6th, 2005, 11:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StaceyB
Even if you lay off a bit I would still do it one or two times a week for a little longer.

Right, that was the plan. She's even up to four hours by herself out of her crate while I'm not home. She's coming right along.
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  #37  
Old October 6th, 2005, 11:19 PM
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Great keep up the good work.
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  #38  
Old October 7th, 2005, 05:03 PM
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tenderfoot tenderfoot is offline
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That is wonderful - sounds like you are doing a great job earning her trust and respect! Keep up the good work.
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  #39  
Old October 7th, 2005, 10:35 PM
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I have a question,doesnt letting them have a ffew bites of food then maiking them stop confuse them even more??
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  #40  
Old October 7th, 2005, 10:48 PM
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People worry a lot about confusing their dogs. A dogs's world is very black and white - or it should be anyway. This is good and that is not. The leader helps to determine that. The leader controls the food. Perhaps the leader might permit the other pack members to eat and then back them away because he decides he is still hungry. It's his rules and they understand that.
I will have a plate of food that I permit each of our dogs to take a bite from. I invite one dog in and let him have his bite and then ask him to leave and invite the next dog in for his bite. My dogs don't get confused - they understand that I control the food and they get what they get when I say so.
Does that address your question?
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  #41  
Old October 7th, 2005, 10:53 PM
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yeah it does,i had a gsd and i messed up in alot of ways and dont want to make the same mistakes when i get another,thanks
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  #42  
Old October 7th, 2005, 11:20 PM
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Dogs will learn to deal with whatever you teach them but they need to be taught. You need to be the decision maker.
Raising a dog is like raising a child. You teach them everything you want them to know to be a good citizen.
You teach your child to be well mannered at home and in public, to be kind and play nice with others, respects and trusts others decisions(Parents,etc). If you expect from a dog what you would your own child everything will work out. If you let them get away with something they do/don't do you can expect that they will do it again.
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  #43  
Old October 8th, 2005, 02:25 AM
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Good advice.I do know now what i did wrong with him,although form the beginning i should of known,he was the only puppy that would not come to us when we went to get one.OK did not mean to hi jack thread..thanks
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  #44  
Old October 8th, 2005, 11:46 AM
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A dog is never too old to learn new rules. It takes a lot more work but it can be done. Studies say that putting senior dogs back into training actually extends their life expectancy because they become physically and mentally active again.
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