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  #1  
Old June 21st, 2007, 06:58 PM
marsupial mama marsupial mama is offline
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need tree ideas (GTA- zone 6a I believe)

I'm looking for ideas - I want to plant some trees in my yard as the old tree I inherited looks like it is dying.

I want something easy, low-maintenance, preferably native and not messy. (We have a poplar and smoke bush in neighbouring yards that make a huge mess every spring).

I like laburnums and quaking aspen in theory but am not sure if they are native and/or messy and/or low maintenance. Am also wondering about a red maple for some fall colour. I *love* fall colour.

Any ideas? I know from Marko's age-of-trees thread that we have some knowledgeable folks on here.

TIA
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  #2  
Old June 21st, 2007, 07:23 PM
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mummummum mummummum is offline
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well knowledgable about trees most certainly does not describe me...

But, have you been to the McMichael Gallery in Kleinberg ? They have the most delicious evergreens edging the driveway to the parking lot. The needles are like feathers.

Maples are lovely but messy btw (we have tons in my 'hood) and if they get those black spots on their leaves which seems to be plaguing Toronto, they have to be collected and disposed of via landfill ~ they can't be composted ~ every year or the disease continues.
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Old June 21st, 2007, 07:32 PM
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i can't believe i'm going to say this...but...go to Humber Nurseries...they really do know their trees and will help you. The trick is to successfully transplant your tree. And they will make you buy this fertilizer...i know cos i used to work there But they do have TONS of trees and the specialists will tell you which is best. They're at hwy 50 and hwy 7.
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Old June 21st, 2007, 07:50 PM
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OOOooooo jiorji's decadent and debauched past comes out...
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Old June 21st, 2007, 08:16 PM
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bahahah mum

tell ya a little secret, at Humber if they get you to buy transplant fertilizer so your tree gets transplanted successfully, the cashier gets an extra $1 on their paycheck for the sale. And it adds up

But you didn't hear it from me
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  #6  
Old June 21st, 2007, 08:50 PM
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Have you considered a flowering dogwood? I'm not sure what zones they thrive in but they are sooo beautiful... Also, here's a link to the UBC Botanical website - you might find some useful info there.

http://www.ubcbotanicalgarden.org/forums/index.phpu
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  #7  
Old June 21st, 2007, 10:54 PM
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I love Humber Nurseries, unfortunately, I live way too close to the place. It's not cheap, but they have everything and very knowledgeable staff.

I have a trembling (quaking) aspen, they are native and they grow quickly in any kind of soil. I'm actually thinking of getting another. I got it at Humber and it wasn't expensive.

If you have a wet spot or one that doesn't drain very well, you could try a crimson frost birch, not as much trouble with borers as the european white birch.

I have a russian olive, but they're weedy, pretty but need to have the dead stuff trimmed off every year.

If you want to go with evergreens stick to the native white pine, can't be beat and a really beautiful tree.

Cindy
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Old June 22nd, 2007, 05:54 AM
marsupial mama marsupial mama is offline
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No birch for me, I am allergic to the pollen and there are enough of them in the neighburhood already!

thanks for the heads up about the maples. It's a pity though, I really wanted to do the Canadian thing

not sure if I can make it to Humber. Do they do the same thing at other nurseries? ($1 for the cashier if they sell the transplanter stuff?) I wouldn;t mind too much.

off to look at the BC website. I;m jealous of Vancouver gardeners. I visited there last year and the first thing I noticed was people's gardens.
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Old June 22nd, 2007, 07:07 AM
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If you want something tropical looking, you could always do a staghorn sumac for something a little different. They can get to 25 feet tall, prefer to be in a dry location. They sucker though, so you'll have to watch for others popping up.
Locust are a nice tree for a more dappled shade effect, get a male though, the female trees are messy.
Walnut and butternut trees are very pretty too, but slow growers.
If you're thinking maple I have an amur maple, smaller than most and havent had any trouble with mine at all with the disease that's going around. I've had mine for almost 20 years now and it's beautiful. Goes crimson in fall and not tons of leaves to rake every fall either.
Tons of choices, I love tress, wish I had room for more.

Cindy
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  #10  
Old June 22nd, 2007, 07:15 AM
marsupial mama marsupial mama is offline
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so many choices - my yard isn't big enough. I love trees although I don't know enough about them.

Can I take it as a rule of thumb that female trees are more messy than male?

Also about aspens - I found out an aspen is a kind of poplar and someone warned me not to plant a poplar because "they fall over". Is that true - are they prone to falling over, or more prone than other trees? But I have wanted a quaking or trembling (I always get the name wrong) aspen for years!
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