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  #1  
Old October 2nd, 2009, 01:48 AM
WILLCHO WILLCHO is offline
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Angry 20 Weeks old Beagle - HUGE BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS NEED HELP!!!!

about 2 and half months ago I bought a puppy beagle. its 20 weeks old now, got all his shots whatsoever. He has been really pissing me and my whole family off lately.

I really need some advice for his problems that I have been encountering lately.

1) He always pees and poops only in the house. He only pees outsite when he really needs to go. I have been trying to move his training pads closer to the door then bringing the pads outside (I live in the 6th floor in an apartment). It doesnt work because it seems like my hallway and the bathroom floor is what his bathroom is. He just pees and poop in my hallway and bathroom floor and always misses his training pad. Now my carpet has many stains and really stinky smell ( I have tried using natures miracle many times to remove the odor which failed )

2) If he doesnt get what he wants, then he growls and tries to kill the person trying to stop him. This happens especially with food that he caught. We are human so mistakes happen. I also live with a younger brother and sister who forget to throw away their food right away. My beagle must have eaten about 10 chicken bones since I have gotten him. About 7 from outside my apartment that was thrown away in the grassy area and when he grabs a bone I cant get it out of his mouth. When he eats some human food and starts chewing and i find out, i try to take it away from him. When my hands get near him, he starts growling and if I dont stop he starts growling even louder and goes beserk and tries to bite me. He bit me really hard once on the arm but nothing bad happened to my arm. I am desperate to figure out how I can stop him from growling when he has some sort of food in his mouth because it seems like hes a whole nother dog when hes acting like that.

3) My beagle seems to hate my sister. Sometimes he would let her hold him and play with him. But, the rest of the time when my sister tries to play with him, he would growl at her and make her go away which caused my sister not to like my dog anymore.

Basically, my dog has a huge attitude problem and i dont know how i can fix this.If he keeps up like this, I dont think i want to keep him anymore. Any good advices would help me greatly. thanks everyone :sad:
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 06:14 AM
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Melinda Melinda is offline
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where did you get this beagle? can you call the breeder for information? I suggest you start from the beginning with the "umbilical" cord, tie him to you, get rid of the pads, mistake from the start as far as I'm concerned, all that does is make you train him twice, take him out on a regular schedual, tied to you he won't be able to steal food, do not free feed, put his dish down and 15 minutes later remove it, when you take him out to pee stay out till it happens, doesn't matter if it takes a long time, walk him to stimulate the need to go, when he does go praise him to high heaven, he's just given you a gift, take him out after his naps, after he eats and the number one key is to exercise him, beagles need tons of exercise! Do you have any trainers in your area? He needs a good obedience class or two.
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 06:53 AM
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Hopefuly Bailey will see this, i am sure she can help. .

Do you have a crate? You should start the nilf method, where you make him sit, or do something before he gets anything. What have you done to try to housetrain him? He doesnt understand. .i think he doesnt have a clear understanding of an established relationship. I agree that getting in touch with the breeder is a good idea for advice, also a trainer and get on a scheduale, or better would be a behaviorist, beagles are a stubborn breed and will be challenging for an inexperienced owner. Get help from a pro and work through this, make sure you make a change, dont be angry at him, it really is not his fault, you can make an amazing dog some day, just takes time and patience, good luck!
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  #4  
Old October 2nd, 2009, 08:42 AM
BenMax BenMax is offline
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Well I can certainly help with the food aggression. This is my favorite passtime it seems. Almost 90% of my fosters have this problem.

This is what I propose and it works.

Step 1. Teach him sit and stay (very important). Before feeding him ensure that he is not overly excited. Remain calm and do not look at him. He does NOT get his food until he sits and stays. Once calm, kneel down with the bowl and ensure he is still sitting and staying as asked. Put the bowl between your knees (legs) and invite him to you while your knees are touching the bowl. Make sure he does not dive into the bowl - hand feed him. Do this exercise for about 1 week until he gets the idea that he is getting his food in this manner.

Step 2. After the above has been accomplished you do the same exercise as above EXCEPT you invite him to eat from the bowl while it is between your knees. Start first with the hand feed and then the bowl. If he growls you cease and continue with step 1.

Step 3. If step 1 and 2 are accomplished continue with the sit, stay, kneel, hand feed first, invite to the bowl and have your hands holding the bowl. If he growls revert back to the above.

Step 4. If step 3 is successful, do all the above; sit, stay, kneel, hand feed first, invite to the bowl BUT your hand IN the bowl. He should eat around your hand without incident. Keep doing this until he changes his behaviour.

Now for the command Leave it. If there is something in his mouth that he should not have this command comes in handy.

First thing you do is teach him leave it for toys, socks etc. Praise when he does leave it. In this instance I do believe a treat is effective since he has food aggression. There will be a positive incentive for him and you will kill 2 birds with one stone.

Good luck and if you have questions, let me know.
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 10:10 AM
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Lyrical44 Lyrical44 is offline
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Your puppy is 20 weeks old. Of course it wont understand that its in the wrong for biting and growling. You need to correct this. It IS a puppy, and by the sounds of it the umbilicle training would be a REALLY good idea. I suggest NOT giving your puppy people food, and have some REALLY tasty treat on you ALL the time so that when your pup does get something it wants, you can maybe trade him/her.

I dont advocate "treat training" I think thats silly, then your dog will expect to get a treat when it does something right, and it will only do the right thing when it has a treat, but for the food aspect, I think that might help. Even if it isnt a tasty treat, try having a fun toy, that the pup ONLY gets when you trade it off for something you dont want it to have.

I am a big supporter of the food stuffed Kong at the moment. I know, I know, I just said I dont support treat training, but there are some stubborn pups out there haha, and it has helped Bennie keep his teeth off things he isnt supposed to have. BUT you do have a puppy, and if you use treats more often, or a food stuffed Kong, you have to alter the pups feeding a little, so it doesnt get fat.

Correction is KEY to your pups growling and biting, you cant let this keep happening because eventually you are going to get really hurt, or one of your siblings. So correct the pup when it starts growling, try trading off the item of concern i.e chicken bones, and see if that works I hope I have been somewhat helpful...
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 10:20 AM
BenMax BenMax is offline
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A dog that has food aggression which is it is a high value item will respond 'positively' to the treat. In order to cease undesired behaviours in this instance, giving food is desired to teach that the hand is presenting something that is desired and to be taken by the dog respectfully.

I am not a huge advocate for praising with food, however in this instance it works.
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 10:23 AM
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Lyrical44 Lyrical44 is offline
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Yeah, was my suggestion unclear? lol I meant that trading an unwanted food item, for a treat woud probably be helpful in this situation...Im a little flustered today haha
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 10:35 AM
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tenderfoot tenderfoot is offline
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Please do not try to trade objects for treats. Then the pup learns that stealing a forbidden object gets a treat. Better to take the time to teach the 'leave it' drill or the 'drop it' drill so that the puppy starts to gain some respect for what is his to chew and what is not.

A great way to do this is to have the leash on the puppy and place toys and shoes, remotes, etc on the floor. when he approaches a forbidden object you will stop him with the leash and say "leave it" in a firm tone. You might have to repeat this a few times until he backs off. When he approaches a toy then you use a warm ,happy tone and encourage him to play with it - you can say "good, ball, get it!" and make a positive association with the toy.

You are empowering your tone and he is learning to listen to YOU (not look for a cookie reward). This is what this pup needs. Lots of opportunites to think, not just react and boss everyone around. The more this puppy learns the better, and start today. He might just be brilliant and that means everyone has an obligation to take the time to teach him a big vocabulary and use it on a daily basis. This could be the best dog ever if you do it right.
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 10:37 AM
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lUvMyLaB<3 lUvMyLaB<3 is offline
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I am just wondering, and please do not take this the wrong way, but how old are you? You say your whole family, and your sister, if you are young, please get some help.

BenMax has given you some awesome advice! It is imortant to be consistant and do what she has said every single time until the problem is fixed, no giving up.

Where did you get the pup from? Some of these issues could stem from before you got him, and knowing where he is from could assist some of the experts here in giving you the advice you need.

As for the housetraining you have to be set up for success, do not ever allow the pup unsupervised freedom. A pup does not come knowing where to go, it takes work. I would get rid of pee pads and just go outside, going in the house has to be not ok. Naures miracle does work, maybe use more and let it soak.

Food aggression can be turned around, especialy in such a young pup, just takes patience. This pup does not know or understand. He needs to be taught gently, he is not bad, pups are not bad, just a reflection of what they have learned. If they poop or pee inside it is because they dont know the right way, no exceptions. I do suggest the nilf method, crate training, exercise and stimulation, umbilical training, positive reinforcement, no negative punishments, and help from a pro. There are lots of people that know so much on here, please listen and take the advice to heart to get on the right path, you will have a best friend for life, we have all been frusterated before, it isnt easy, good luck!
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  #10  
Old October 2nd, 2009, 10:42 AM
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Lyrical44 Lyrical44 is offline
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Im kind of curious too, as to how old the OP is.

Your family can always help too, You can make it kind of like a CALM game for you and your siblings, teach the puppy, the puppy will enjoy the praise when he takes the correct object, and your family will like the time spent with the puppy
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 10:48 AM
BenMax BenMax is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tenderfoot View Post
Please do not try to trade objects for treats. Then the pup learns that stealing a forbidden object gets a treat. Better to take the time to teach the 'leave it' drill or the 'drop it' drill so that the puppy starts to gain some respect for what is his to chew and what is not.

A great way to do this is to have the leash on the puppy and place toys and shoes, remotes, etc on the floor. when he approaches a forbidden object you will stop him with the leash and say "leave it" in a firm tone. You might have to repeat this a few times until he backs off. When he approaches a toy then you use a warm ,happy tone and encourage him to play with it - you can say "good, ball, get it!" and make a positive association with the toy.

You are empowering your tone and he is learning to listen to YOU (not look for a cookie reward). This is what this pup needs. Lots of opportunites to think, not just react and boss everyone around. The more this puppy learns the better, and start today. He might just be brilliant and that means everyone has an obligation to take the time to teach him a big vocabulary and use it on a daily basis. This could be the best dog ever if you do it right.
Hey Tenderfoot where have you been??

Ok - for the first time ever I disagree. Someone take a picture.

Out of all the food agressive dogs I get, I do trade as a last resort. Believe it or not, it is very successful. I should have perhaps added, that this must be tappered off so that it does not teach the dog he/she will always get treats.

I am a true believer that hands are that for carassing and feeding (all that is enjoyable and positive). For this reason, I never associate anything negative with hands (not that you mentioned anything - I just thought I would add this).

As for everything else you stated, I agree 100%
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 10:50 AM
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Bailey_ Bailey_ is offline
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WILLCHO, you've gotten some great advice from the members above. I just have one question:

Does your puppy become the same way when playing with his toys or is this reaction just with food?
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 10:51 AM
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lUvMyLaB<3 lUvMyLaB<3 is offline
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I am just wondering, and please do not take this the wrong way, but how old are you? You say your whole family, and your sister, if you are young, please get some help.

BenMax has given you some awesome advice! It is imortant to be consistant and do what she has said every single time until the problem is fixed, no giving up.

Where did you get the pup from? Some of these issues could stem from before you got him, and knowing where he is from could assist some of the experts here in giving you the advice you need.

As for the housetraining you have to be set up for success, do not ever allow the pup unsupervised freedom. A pup does not come knowing where to go, it takes work. I would get rid of pee pads and just go outside, going in the house has to be not ok. Naures miracle does work, maybe use more and let it soak.

Food aggression can be turned around, especialy in such a young pup, just takes patience. This pup does not know or understand. He needs to be taught gently, he is not bad, pups are not bad, just a reflection of what they have learned. If they poop or pee inside it is because they dont know the right way, no exceptions. I do suggest the nilf method, crate training, exercise and stimulation, umbilical training, positive reinforcement, no negative punishments, and help from a pro. There are lots of people that know so much on here, please listen and take the advice to heart to get on the right path, you will have a best friend for life, we have all been frusterated before, it isnt easy, good luck!
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 11:47 AM
WILLCHO WILLCHO is offline
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I got LOTS of good advices from everyone and Im willing to try all of them out.

And for the questions some people had for me.

HOW OLD ARE YOU?
-Im 19 years old

Does your puppy become the same way when playing with his toys or is this reaction just with food?
-Just human food actually. If it is his regular dog food, he doesn't really care. He growls when playing with his toys if i play tug of war with him.

As for its original breeder, I am not sure who it is because I bought the dog off my cousin and came into my house with some nasty habits such as peeing and pooping only in the house. And im unaware of where my cousin got the dog.


I will try removing all the peeing pads and start taking him out to pee/poop as I read in the above posts.

As for crate training, I will try that last.

Also, about the feeding by hand, I have done that in the beginning then eventually I just gave him his food because my cousin told me that its okay to do that. I never knew it would make my Snoopy into a little devil

Oh yeah i forgot to mention, since day 1 I got snoopy, he h as been sleeping with me on my bed. Is that okay? I dont mind it but sometimes he growls in his sleep when I try to move him around so that I can get into a comfortable position. My cousin told me that snoopy slept on his bed since day 1 also.

ANDDD another thing to mention, sorry everyone, whenever snoopy sees someone that he hasnt seen for a couple of hours or more (ie my mom comes back from work, sees my cousin every weekend...etc) he gets really excited and starts whining like crazy and pees on whatever he is on! is there anyway to fix that or will he always pee when he gets excited?


I am also a first time dog owner =\
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 11:47 AM
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tenderfoot tenderfoot is offline
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Hey Tenderfoot where have you been??

Ok - for the first time ever I disagree. Someone take a picture.

Out of all the food agressive dogs I get, I do trade as a last resort. Believe it or not, it is very successful. I should have perhaps added, that this must be tappered off so that it does not teach the dog he/she will always get treats.

I am a true believer that hands are that for carassing and feeding (all that is enjoyable and positive). For this reason, I never associate anything negative with hands (not that you mentioned anything - I just thought I would add this).

As for everything else you stated, I agree 100%
Hey there BenMax!!!

We have been so freaking busy that I have had to back away from the very time comsuming online help that we offer. I wish I could do it all of the time but between training, writing, and caring for 25 animals something has to give. I am constantly trying to figure out how to get more organized so that I could spend at least 1/2 day answering questions on line...but then the phone rings, or a dog needs out, or the horses need feeding or I have a client showing up. Good to be busy.

I totally respect that you have been very successful with trading items. You have tons of experience and are doing a great job. Thanks for fostering all of those dogs by the way!

It's not that we never treat a dog but it is pretty rare. I would much rather the behavior come out of relationship with the person. The person's voice, touch, warmth, energy is the treat.

Devils advocate speaking ...What happens if the treat doesn't do the trick? What if the dog is not motvated by food but is simply trying to make a point by guarding the item? What if the item the dog has is better than the treat that you happen to have a the moment? Do you go to the fridge to find something else - meanwhile the dog swallows the object? I feel like I need to teach 'leave it' and 'drop it' in advance so that when the real thing shows up I only need to look at the dog or say something and he changes his mind and leaves it alone.

NOT to say that you don't have great relationships with your dogs and that you haven't done an amazing job. But I think you probably work your dogs more than most and your experience alone factors into a lot of what is conveyed to your dog.

I think the camera may not be needed just yet as we are much more alike in our thinking than we have said.
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 11:50 AM
WILLCHO WILLCHO is offline
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BTW I dont think trading with treats wont work. Judging by how Snoopy thinks (and he is really smart) he would take the treat and right away go back to the human food that he had. And I dont think he will give up his human food first
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 12:37 PM
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Oh yeah i forgot to mention, since day 1 I got snoopy, he h as been sleeping with me on my bed. Is that okay? I dont mind it but sometimes he growls in his sleep when I try to move him around so that I can get into a comfortable position. My cousin told me that snoopy slept on his bed since day 1 also.

ANDDD another thing to mention, sorry everyone, whenever snoopy sees someone that he hasnt seen for a couple of hours or more (ie my mom comes back from work, sees my cousin every weekend...etc) he gets really excited and starts whining like crazy and pees on whatever he is on! is there anyway to fix that or will he always pee when he gets excited?

I am also a first time dog owner =\
1. Sleeping with your dog is just fine - the pack sleeps together, often touching - it is natural. We sometimes have 8 dogs in our bed!! The bed is not the issue it is who owns the bed, and it sounds like he is a tad cranky about having his sleep disturbed. If he ever growls over the bed then you need to work on his manners with the bed. Put a leash on him and invite him up. Hang out with him for a minute and then ask him to get 'off'. If he doesn't, then you use the leash to remove him from the bed and praise him for getting off. Repeat, repeat, repeat until he gets off on his own and have a party when he does this voluntarily. He needs to learn the bed is yours not his and that he only gets to be on it if he has good manners. Then if he were to growl when he's on the bed that is your cue to get him off. Since you have practiced then he should be clear as to your meaning and jump off. I would not invite him back up for at least 10 minutes and then try again.

Remember dogs do what works and then they do it even more. So if his growling backs you away then he will do it more. But if he learns that good manners keep him on the bed then he will choose that.

2. Excitement peeing has to work itself out - they will usually get over it by age 1 year!
However you can help it improve. Do not ever get angry at him for excitement peeing it will only make it worse. EVERYONE in the house needs to be very clear that they are to ignore Snoopy when they enter the house. Pretend that you are too busy right now to greet him. Go put your stuff away, go to the bathroom, get a drink, check your messages - anything but the dog. Don't even look at him. When enough time has gone by and he is calmer then you can CALMLY greet him. If he gets all excited then simply walk away, you can try again a few minutes. It is your job to teach good greeting manners - it isn't going to happen on its own. But every time someone walks into the apartment and gets all excited as they greet the dog - that is what he learns to do - the door opens and he goes nuts because thats what the humans taught him to do.
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 12:42 PM
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The idea with treat trading would be to remove the people food right away and be rid of it, so he CANT take it back.

Once you choose a method of training that seems to work, stick to it. I hope some of this works out for you
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 01:00 PM
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tenderfoot tenderfoot is offline
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The idea with treat trading would be to remove the people food right away and be rid of it, so he CANT take it back.
Sorry to beat a topic to death... but don't get rid of the item because then you are avoiding teaching him how to make a better choice. I want to be able to put anything in front of him - people food included - and get him to back away because I said so. If you hide the item nothing has been learned and it remains a coveted object for the dog.
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 02:30 PM
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Just out of curiosity, why exactly IS your dog being fed human food? Most 'human food' isn't good for our dogs anyways - it's full of chemicals, sodium and other natural substances that dogs don't tolerate well over long periods of time. I agree with Tenderfoot - it's really important for you to be able to leave your own food right in front of your dog without the concern that he will eat it - but this WILL NOT HAPPEN if you are feeding him little bits of your lunch & dinner.
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 02:47 PM
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Sorry, TF, I have to disagree with letting the dog continue sleeping on the bed at this point in his training. My reason: there is obviously territory related issues occuring, and as a first time dog owner it may be more difficult for you to be aware of 'when' to remove him and when to invite him up; not to mention that during the night you'll be less likely to hop out of bed and start training him when he refuses to move for you.

Aside from growling there are very subtle signs that a dog will give us to establish that he's not comfortable with us moving on the bed, signs that you may not yet notice. (Ears held close to the head, licking his lips, looking at you out of the corner of his eye, etc).

And while YOU could potentially gain respect from your dog over your bed, this isn't to say that someone you eventually end up living with also will garner that same respect from your pooch over the bed issue if you continue sleeping with him at night. Teaching him now that the bed is simply off-limits IMO is your best bet. When he eventually stops jumping up on the bed, or showing any interest at all about being on the bed, would be the time to start inviting him up and removing him from the bed during the day on your terms.

Do you have a crate for him? I highly reccomend training him at this point to sleep in his crate at night. Your pup will absolutley get a much better sleep, as will you, and it will be a source of comfort and security for him as he gets older.
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Last edited by Bailey_; October 2nd, 2009 at 03:00 PM.
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Old October 2nd, 2009, 05:05 PM
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lUvMyLaB<3 lUvMyLaB<3 is offline
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If he is not housetrained I don't think that he should be sleeping on your bed, although I think sharing your bed with your dog is fine, but that is just asking for him to hop off and piddle..

You cannot allow eyes off him for even a second, if he is free to roam, he will pee, poo, get into things he cant have, chew ect.. If you are too busy or away, he needs to be in a kennel, he wont potty in there. While you are doing chores, tie the leash to your waist so he has to follow you, even if he is sleeping you get up and move, he gets up and moves, he must move out of your way and follow, this will help him learn who is in control here, as well as not allowing for him to steal food from your sisters, or potty inside.

You can put him in the kennel, then take him outside, if he goes, throw a party, if he doesn't out him back for 30 more minutes, then do it again, sometimes the will poop 2 times before they are done, always celebrate a success. If you catch him going in the house, clap your hands a firm no, and quickly take him outside, reward for going. When you are outside say go peepee or something like that and just wait, don't play, this is business time, just wait and ignore, then when he goes you praise him, wont take long to figure out how to make you happy.

what have you been doing for housetraining? if he is loose are you just hoping that he will go to the pads? That will frusterate you both. I am sure your pup is frusterated now too about the new homes he has had and about the mixed signals.

You have to try to just set up for success, try not to let failure happen, don't allow for peepee accidents, or getting into things he shouldn't be in. Train the drop it and leave it with his favorite chewy or stuffy, those will help.

also feed a good HIGH quality no grain food, this will make less poop and a very predicatble pooping scheduale that makes housetraining easier, what do you feed him and how often?

How much exercise and stimulation does he get? He is a hound and needs to have that need satisfied to be a balanced happy dog, on your terms make sure you do this. Hide his favorite toy and have him find it, first just under a blankie with him watching.. and graduate up to where you can hide it in the yard and he has to go find it, my cocker loved this game, and it got to where if I didn't know where his ball was I would just say go find your ball and he would seach until he found that thing! Your dog would be great at this and pick up on it fast.

Consistancy and patience.. can't say it enough, reward for right behavior, don't punish the bad.
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  #23  
Old October 2nd, 2009, 06:21 PM
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tenderfoot tenderfoot is offline
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I respect your opinion, Bailey, and I agree to a point.

If you teach your dog about the bed, the furniture, your personal items and what is his to have (with good manners) than none of it becomes an issue. So back to the old point of ...teach your dog right from wrong and you will have a great dog and very few problems. The bed is not right or wrong it is simply yours and he needs to learn that. The confusion usually lies with the persons interpretation of rules, not the dogs understanding of rules when they are clear.

If it is a territory issue with the dog than the dog needs even more practice giving up territory, toys and food because he needs to get a clue - now!

People food should not be the problem, the problem is this little pup thinks he can control the people around him, and people food just takes it all to a higher level for him so he gets extra nasty. So we need to practice taking things away a lot and he needs to have good manners about it. Maybe he just picked up a stick on the road but I thought it was a deer bone so I say 'drop it' and he does. I examine it and realize it was only a wooden stick and so I let him have it back. So sometimes he gets it back and sometimes he doesn't - my decision not his.

The point is he is welcome on the bed IF and WHEN you say it's okay. But if you get a new partner who doesn't like dogs in bed then it is not an issue because the dog is no longer invited up. End of conversation - the dog should not argue with you about it.

So lets take this opportunity to teach the newbies (sorry if that sounds insulting, I can't think of another word right now) that there are very subtle signs that cue you into your dogs attitude/behavior. The eyes, the ears, the way the hair lays on the body, the body stance, the nose, the lips, the breathing, the tail etc are all clues as to what your dog is thinking and feeling in this heart beat and what is likely to happen in the next. You need to learn to respond to the thoughts your dog is having and not wait for the action to show up. Easier for both of you.

Crate training is always good for every dog. It prevents a ton of problems and potential issues.
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  #24  
Old October 2nd, 2009, 06:27 PM
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I really don't mean to be so arguementative but I keep reading things that may not be 100%.

Puppies will often sleep more soundly when they are in your bed because they sleep more deeply next to a beating heart and warm body.

If you keep a short lead on the pup attached to your wrist then you will get a tug when he gets up and you will have the chance to get him outside to potty, no playing or loving, just straight to business, and then right back to bed.

We start all of our dogs out this way and it works like a charm. We also crate train at the same time, so they learn to do either the bed, the crate or their own bed next to us - whatever we ask of them.

I am not saying everyone has to raise their pups this way. There are way too many people who would never dream of inviting their dog into their bed and thats fine. All I am saying is that it is very doable according to your rules and boundaries.
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  #25  
Old October 2nd, 2009, 07:36 PM
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Quote:
If you teach your dog about the bed, the furniture, your personal items and what is his to have (with good manners) than none of it becomes an issue. So back to the old point of ...teach your dog right from wrong and you will have a great dog and very few problems.
I agree TF. Unfortunatley this is not what the OP is dealing with, therefore as I mentioned - I believe it would be more beneficial to keep the dog off the bed - all the time, until the dog understands boundaries and is no longer jumping on the bed at free will, expecting to sleep on the bed at night.

Quote:
Puppies will often sleep more soundly when they are in your bed because they sleep more deeply next to a beating heart and warm body.
I also agree with this to a point. However I believe this would be the case if (as you mentioned you do with your dogs) this kind of sleeping pattern was established with the owners right from day one. With this scenario one needs to be careful that it doesn't also cause a confusion of boundaries for the dogs, which can happen easily if the owner isn't aware of what to watch for or how to properly invite and remove their new puppy.
On the other hand, if you immediatley put the puppy in the crate, the crate becomes the area where it feels safe and secure - regardless of whether or not there is someone with it. In fact, my dogs are invited to sleep on our beds now that their crate-training has been established, however our youngest puppy refuses to stay. She will jump down and go into her crate and sleeps there with the door open, regardless of her opportunity to sleep with us.

Crating also creates structure and is much safer for your dog. I agree that allowing them to sleep with you can make the bonding process advance more quickly, BUT it can also cause anxiety, behavioral problems, and even depression if the dog is forced to leave it's owner for an extended period of time. For these main reasons, I don't advise that puppies are allowed on the bed - UNTIL crate-training is in place.

Just my ..There are many great ways to train a puppy, the important thing is to find something that works for both you and your dog.
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  #26  
Old October 3rd, 2009, 06:18 AM
WILLCHO WILLCHO is offline
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thanks for the advices but let me update you guys for now.

today i took him for a 1 hour walk (WE WALKED AROUND MY WHOLE NEIGHBORHOOD!) no success. I took him home with the training pads removed and didnt allow him to get near the bathroom so he doesnt pee or poop. Next thing you know, he poops in my room I took him out again and we went on a little road trip and came back home. I came into my room to get my phone that I had left and left right away and I could tell Snoopy wanted to Pee so badly. I restrained him from going to my bathroom and took him outside and he finally peed outside on the grasy area TWICE Later today I went out again and came back and took him to the grassy area again fora bout 30minutes and no success :sad: as soon as we came back home he ran tot he bathroom and peed *sigh*. i got to try again tomorrow although i didnt expect much to happen today.

about the agression issue, he was growling like crazy today to me and my friends. He found aping pong ball and kept chewing on it and when we tried to take it away he would growl like crazy. When i took it out of his mouth, he bit my hand once and wouldnt let go for about 5 seconds. It didnt hurt as bad though but thats still a really bad thing.

as for crate training, i am really looking forward to buying one of these later next week and my girlfriend is willing to pay for his obediance classes at petsmart so i hope things can get well.

thanks for the great comments and suggestions guys ill update once again very soon
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  #27  
Old October 3rd, 2009, 12:04 PM
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lUvMyLaB<3 lUvMyLaB<3 is offline
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what did you do after he bit you? When he had the ball what did you to to try and get it?

It is really important that you dont let him loose, and allow the running to the bathroom to pee, if he has not gone outside after you tried like that, he cannot have freedom inside. He has been taught that it is ok to go in the house, that is what he thinks he is supposed to do, you have to try very hard to not let it happen, it puts you back another step. Keep him tied to you, or kenneled at all times right now. Did you catch him peeing in the bathroom? That is when you say NO pick him up and take him straight outside. Good luck, it will be work..

Great that you will start classes. Would be awesome to find a trainer or a behaviorist that you could have lots of one on one time with. good luck!
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  #28  
Old October 3rd, 2009, 01:09 PM
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tenderfoot tenderfoot is offline
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Let's get things in order today.

This little guy has way too much 'recess' time and is getting away with way too much bad behavior. He is doing as he pleases with no regard for anyone - time to step up to the plate with some structure, boundaries and rules. Starting today, you need to keep him on a leash attached to you in the house as much as you can stand it - you are the leader/teacher/parent and he is the follower/student/child. When he is not with you then he is either in a crate or confined to an area that you don't care if he soils. He should be with you more than he is in the crate. *Go to our web site to learn more about crate training*

He gets 3 meals a day fed from your hand. The leash is on him at this time. Your hand will be closed with food in it. When he is calm, preferably sitting and looks at you in the eyes you will offer him your closed fist. When he licks your hand you will open it and offer him a few kibbles. This is going to take time but it is important. Only good manners gets him food. If he gets snarky you are going to tell him 'no' in a firm tone and use the leash to back him away from your hand. You will not give up. The leash will keep him from biting you and give you some control. When he calms down and looks at you - you will start fresh and keep feeding him. Try very hard not to get frustrated or increase your anger - stay calm and clear. Eventually you are going to get your hand closer to the bowl of food and be able to swish your hand around the bowl as he eats.

Potty training is going to be greatly aided by the leash. If he is on the leash in the house you are with him most of the time and you are going to be better at catching him trying to make a mistake. Right now you are starting from ground zero - because he doesn't understand that it is not okay to soil the house. You have to take him out frequently (every 1/2 hour to hour) like he is a tiny puppy. You need to give it a word like 'go potty' to give him a clue about what you want and when he does it you are going to praise him warmly and even give him treat (same rules for feeding him a treat as above). He needs to learn that you love to see him potty outside. When you are inside and he looks like he is thinking about soiling you are going to say 'do you have to go out?' and take him out. If you catch him actually trying to soil you are going to startle him with a foot stomp or hand clap and say 'no' in a firm, sharp tone. Then get happy and say 'let's go out' and take him out. Stay with him until he soils and praise. If he doesn't soil in a reasonable time then go back in and either crate him or keep him on the leash and start over. Take him out again in another 15-30 mintues and he should succeed.

You need to teach him to drop things to you. The best thing to teach him for this is 'drop' and 'take it'. Have him on the leash. Use someting like a Bully Stick to teach this. Hold the stick and tell him to 'take it' in a friendly tone. While you are holding one end let him chew it for 2 seconds then point at his nose and say 'drop it' in a firm, sharp tone. If he does not drop willingly then you can firmly but gently, pop it up and down (dont be too harsh, but just enough energy that he lets go) and praise him for releasing it. Even though he didn't do it willingly - you still won. Keep repeating this drill until he lets go of the stick voluntarily. Then let him have it for longer and longer periods of time. You are sharing YOUR stick with him and teaching him manners. Over time (minutes not days) you can let go of the stick but don't take your hand fully away, just move in again and say 'drop it' as you take it. Praise & pet. Each time you are going to let him have it for longer and your hand will come further away. He is learning that you can take thigns but he is likely to get them back. He is also learning to relax and trust you and respect you. All good things. If he gets snarky you can use your leash to get him back and start again - just like with the food. Do not end on failure always end on success.

This little guy needs tons of structure, learning and relationship. He needs to start to care about what his people think and be less impulsive. You need to let him know that you care about the choices he makes and you are there to help guide him through the bad ones and celebrate the good ones. Just like having a child. This takes time, effort and commitment.

I hope that Pet Smart training helps but know that this is a bigger problem than simple sits, downs and stays.
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  #29  
Old October 3rd, 2009, 02:09 PM
nifty nifty is offline
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Thanks for all the tips tenderfoot!
I am having similar problems with my pup. I'm going to try out your tips today.
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  #30  
Old October 12th, 2009, 03:17 PM
WILLCHO WILLCHO is offline
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here is another update.

I havent done crate training but I have learned more about my dog. When we are in the house, and when he jumps off the bed and sits by the door and stares at me, he tells me that he needs to go bathroom. I take him outside and he does his thing. He pisses in the house once in a while now and never poops in the house =]

He went really crazy again one day when I took his bone away and he bit my arm and now I am going to have a scar from it. He wouldnt stop growling and showing his teeth until i lifted his ear up and screamed NO. Right away he stopped and went back to normal. Another time he was growling I just pushed him to the floor and held him byt he neck and screamed NO at his ears and again he went back to normal. I wonder if this is making any progress o_o
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