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Old January 25th, 2009, 11:29 AM
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Blab Blab is offline
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Debate on spaying methods; advice??

Hi, I need to get my dog spayed.

I was reading this article (warning graphic pictures) that there is a debate on two types, oophorectomy (or ovariectomy) and ovariohysterectomy. The former, oophorectomy, is when they just remove the ovaries and what is commonly practiced in Europe. In North America the common practice is ovariohysterectomy where they remove the ovaries and the uterus as well.

Those that support ooferectomies think that "the possible complications involved in removing a healthy uterus must be considered: a greater risk of excess bleeding, longer time under anesthesia and more significant pain."

Those that support ovariohysterectomy risk of uterine infection and uterine cancer, but the article stated that there’s no real evidence to back the claim.

The author of the article is a vet from North America and supports the ooferectomy method because it does less harm to the dog. It sounds like a convincing argument and I would certainly like to do less harm to Georgie. I have a (human!) friend that had a hysterectomy and she took a very long time to heal and it was painful.

There is a very highly regarded veteranary practice (Vancouver Animal Wellness Hospital) that will perform both methods so I have a decision to make and would like any advice from anyone who has had their dog spayed with the ooferectomy method or have an educated opinion.

I am specifically concened that because the ooferectomy method is relatively new here that vets may have less experience with it than the traditional whole-shooting-match method. Can there be complications? And because the two other vet practices I called don't perform the method-- but maybe only because they are more comfortable doing it the way they were taught?

Sorry for the long post

Last edited by Blab; January 25th, 2009 at 11:55 AM.
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Old January 25th, 2009, 11:54 AM
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Gail P Gail P is offline
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I have no experience with the newer method, but I've seen some infections before and they're nasty things. As a student I did a co-op placement at a vet clinic and I observed lots of the traditional spays, including one with a bad infection that could have ruptured and caused a lot of trouble for the dog. Stump pyometras can also occur if the stump is left too long when the dog is spayed. My own dogs that I've had spayed have always had the complete ovariohysterectomy and none have ever taken long to recover or exhibited signs of pain. They're usually wanting to be active and play before I'm supposed to let them. Rain did have a reaction to the suture material, but regardless of which type of spay was performed she still would have had to be stitched up and reacted to the sutures. In her case everything seemed to be healing up well but a couple of months later she started getting blisters along the incision line and eventually a knotted up piece of suture material worked it's way out.
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Old January 25th, 2009, 12:15 PM
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kiara kiara is offline
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I never heard of having a choice? In North America the total spaying is performed. It will mean longer time under anaesthetic and longer recouperation. But as the article states "since the animal is under anaesthetic already", you may as well do a total. It is preventive medicine and the animal will never get cancer in that area, or have any other problems. As for the human total, it is the same story. She most likely had fibroids and the doctors also performed a total, as a preventive measure, because fibroids may come back and she will never develop cancer in that area.
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Old January 25th, 2009, 12:42 PM
cell cell is offline
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I would be concered with the ovary oly removal that it may take longer, instdead of tying off the phone uterus and removing it along with the ovaries the 2 ovaries would have to be tied and removed separately which could incure longer anesthetic time. I would agree if your going into the area anyway you might as well remove everything to prevent later cancers and infections. The uterus is esentially useless without the ovaries anyway, removing the ovaries removed the hormones and the ability to ovulate and reproduce which is the intention of the surgury. Also remember with humans we are a vertical and bi pedal species, therefore when we have any abdominal surgery we are at the mercy of a heavier gravitational pull then with a dog. and humans tend to dwell more on surgeries which can increase pain and reduce healing time. Most spay dogs begin running around normally within a few days or hours.

Last edited by cell; January 25th, 2009 at 12:50 PM.
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Old January 25th, 2009, 01:10 PM
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Thanks for all the advice. I worry too that it could actually take longer which is a bad thing, especially since they are likely less practiced here in the oofer procedure than in Europe and two ovaries to suture. And I am also glad to hear that it doesn't affect dogs as much as humans. I am new to all this so all the info from your experiences is really helpful.

If I do the traditional method I'm thinking then to just go to the SPCA Animal Hospital because they do so many of them. And because I don't know anything about the dog's history--which they also likely have more experience with than any vets since they take in lots of strays--I can get a full checkup there too.

Thanks!
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