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Old May 14th, 2010, 02:33 PM
Sean1969 Sean1969 is offline
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Crusty Dog nose Pics

My dog has this fungus on her nose and ears, I thought it was sun burn. But it wont heal. Does any one know how to heal this? or what may be causing it. She is allergic to some dog foods, and is this contagious to my other dog?
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Old May 14th, 2010, 02:48 PM
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How long has your dogs ears/nose looked like that? Have you seen a vet? If not, perhaps you should. I have no clue what that is but is looks painful.

What dog food are you feeding? What do you think she is allergic to?
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Old May 14th, 2010, 03:04 PM
Sean1969 Sean1969 is offline
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Originally Posted by diandpat View Post
How long has your dogs ears/nose looked like that? Have you seen a vet? If not, perhaps you should. I have no clue what that is but is looks painful.

What dog food are you feeding? What do you think she is allergic to?

Yes Ive seen a vet. All the vet said is that she has allergies, The Vet gave me Epi-Otic and Otomax for yeast in ears and told me to put neosporin on nose...It comes and goes. The only dog food I found after about 10 different brands, That dont make her belly break out in hives is Purina Dog Chow. This nose thing started last year. I just dont want my other dog to get it. And help the one that has it.
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Old May 14th, 2010, 03:28 PM
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Wow, you must be so frustrated...

First off, Purina Dog Chow is probably not the best choice if it is caused by allergies...way too many grains and fillers (and crap LOL)

You need to go to a Pet Supply Store and check out their grain free choices. If you can afford them, Orijen, Acana, and Wellness are popular brands with the folks here.

Have you put your dog on a bland diet (boiled rice or potatoes mixed with boiled meat or chicken) since this "rash" started? It is common diet when allergies do flare up If it is allergies it should settle down, if not totally clear up, with this diet. Try it for a bit and then introduce a better quality kibble.

www.dogfoodanalysis.com is an excellent site to compare foods. Also, check out the food section of this board...excellent recommendations by very food savy people.

As I said, even if it is not allergies, it would be a good idea to get your dogs off the dog chow.

Hopefully someone much wiser will pop in and give you some options about this scabby nose...is there another vet you can get a second opinion from? A year of on/off scabby nose would make we miserable...I am sure your dog would like some relief.

Good luck and keep us posted!
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Old May 14th, 2010, 06:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diandpat View Post
First off, Purina Dog Chow is probably not the best choice if it is caused by allergies...way too many grains and fillers (and crap LOL)

You need to go to a Pet Supply Store and check out their grain free choices. If you can afford them, Orijen, Acana, and Wellness are popular brands with the folks here.
I totally agree with diandpat. I'm pretty sure changing the diet to a better one , would help.
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Old May 14th, 2010, 07:09 PM
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Maybe Hazel can weigh in her thoughts on whether this looks like folliculitus?? not sure of exact spelling?
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Old May 14th, 2010, 10:30 PM
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It's similar, Winston, but I don't think it is. With Ridge's folliculitis, the follicles actually became pussy and the areas drained. This looks more like a burn. Notice how it extends down the leather of the nose?

So I don't think it's folliculitis.

I do think you should see a specialist, Sean. That has to be uncomfortable, and the longer it goes without proper treatment, the more permanent damage it can do. I'm wondering if it's an allergic reaction, or something autoimmune related. Whatever it is, it's probably not contagious if your other dog hasn't caught it after all these months.

Meanwhile, I'll PM Dr Lee to look at your thread.

for a diagnosis, treatment and quick recovery of your dog!
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Old May 14th, 2010, 10:54 PM
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Question: You stated that your dog has a fungal infection. Is this a confirmed diagnosis by your veterinarian or a tentative suspicion? If your pet has a diagnosed fungal infection, the the treatment should be fairly straightforward with oral antifungal medication and possibly some topical treatment.


When I look at the location of the lesion along with the ulceration and depigmentation of the nose; I think that your dog may have an infectious or immune mediated disease.

For these type lesions, the is what the board certified dermatologist,Trish Ashley, DVM, DACVD recommends from her article entitled, "Dermatologic Look-alikes: Making the Correct Diagnosis (V61)" from the Western Veterinary Conference 2009:
  • "A 3-4 week long course an appropriate antibiotic is justified prior to doing a biopsy. If response is poor, then biopsy to rule out DLE v. other nasal dermatoses (e.g., actinic changes, pemphigus, neoplasia) is warranted." -Trish Ashley, DVM, DACVD

DLE stands for Discoid Lupus Erythematosis.

So the list of possibilities includes: fungal infection (can rule out with a fungal culture), a bacterial infection (ruled out with both culture and 4 week course of empiric oral antibiotic therapy), immune mediated diseases or tumor (diagnosed with biopsy. antibiotics prior are needed to make sure that and secondary bacterial inflammation does not obscure the sample).

Topical therapy is fine but with some of the changes seen in the pictures, may not be enough.

I hope that this helps.
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Old May 14th, 2010, 11:21 PM
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Thanks, Dr Lee!
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Old May 14th, 2010, 11:58 PM
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Thanks for the PM!

These lesions are not that uncommon. Unfortunately when the nasal planum and adjacent skin have severe inflammation the areas will look the same regardless of the underlying cause. Thus a fungal infection, bacteria, DLE, pemphigous, tumor, etc. can all look the same. So the key is a methodical workup with fungal and bacterial culture, followed by 4 week course of antibiotics, and then biopsy. If a biopsy is performed, it should be submitted to a dermal histopathologist which is a subspecialty. Often in the course of the workup, blood testing may be recommended to rule out underlying disorders like Cushing's disease or hypothyroid which may predispose the pet to a bacterial or fungal infection.

And to help you feel better, a tumor (that is cancer) is much less likely. I would focus on infectious or immune mediated disorders. We have to include tumors but based upon the photos, I think that cancer is unlikely.

Again, hope it helps.
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Old May 16th, 2010, 09:06 AM
Sean1969 Sean1969 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Lee View Post
Thanks for the PM!

These lesions are not that uncommon. Unfortunately when the nasal planum and adjacent skin have severe inflammation the areas will look the same regardless of the underlying cause. Thus a fungal infection, bacteria, DLE, pemphigous, tumor, etc. can all look the same. So the key is a methodical workup with fungal and bacterial culture, followed by 4 week course of antibiotics, and then biopsy. If a biopsy is performed, it should be submitted to a dermal histopathologist which is a subspecialty. Often in the course of the workup, blood testing may be recommended to rule out underlying disorders like Cushing's disease or hypothyroid which may predispose the pet to a bacterial or fungal infection.

And to help you feel better, a tumor (that is cancer) is much less likely. I would focus on infectious or immune mediated disorders. We have to include tumors but based upon the photos, I think that cancer is unlikely.

Again, hope it helps.
Thank you all for your help, After watching my dog over the past few days I have noticed that she like to Sun her slef on the hot-tub lid(she jumps up on it). I thinks she is getting sunburned on top of the skin problem. I will take her back to the vet on Monday. The vet told me this is a common fungus that dogs can get, so I just goop the dogs nose up with nepsporin to keep it moist. I know now that the neosprin is not helping.. Thanks again
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Old May 22nd, 2010, 02:39 PM
Sean1969 Sean1969 is offline
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Originally Posted by Sean1969 View Post
Thank you all for your help, After watching my dog over the past few days I have noticed that she like to Sun her slef on the hot-tub lid(she jumps up on it). I thinks she is getting sunburned on top of the skin problem. I will take her back to the vet on Monday. The vet told me this is a common fungus that dogs can get, so I just goop the dogs nose up with nepsporin to keep it moist. I know now that the neosprin is not helping.. Thanks again
Well....this is what I found out, The vet says its lupus erythematosus.
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Old May 23rd, 2010, 08:04 PM
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Not the best of news, Sean but with meds she'll at least be more comfortable! I hope she's feeling lots better soon!
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Old May 24th, 2010, 12:01 AM
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Well it is good to have a diagnosis. It really did not look like a fungal infection. There are two types of lupus erythematosus. One is systemic (involving the entire body) and the other is not. This is the other one. It is called Discoid Lupus Erythematosus (DLE) if it just affects the nose. It has a much better prognosis.

Here is an Excerpt from a Client Education Handout from Dr Becky Lundgren which goes over DLE in a very concise manner:
Known as collie nose, discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is an inflammatory skin disease seen in dogs and, very rarely, in cats. It usually affects the face and nose. Itís possible that DLE is a non-systemic type of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but it isnít as serious as SLE.

Owners usually first notice a loss of pigmentation around the dogís nose. In some dogs, the bridge of the nose, the lips, the skin around the eyes, the ears, and the genitals may also be affected. DLE can change the surface of the nose from its normal cobblestone texture to smooth. Ulcerated sores may eventually occur. Some dogs find the disease really irritating and annoying, while others donít seem to notice it much.

There is some thought that DLE could be a seasonal disease, because itís affected by the ultraviolet rays in sunlight and is usually more of a problem in summer. Itís seen more often in high altitude locations where exposure to ultraviolet light is increased.

Itís most often seen in Brittanys, Collies, Shetland sheepdogs, German shepherds, German shorthaired pointers, and Siberian huskies. Females are at slightly more risk than are males. Dogs with DLE are often predisposed to squamous cell carcinoma.

Diagnosis can be confusing, as the same signs can be seen in such conditions as solar dermatitis, pemphigus, and ringworm. In addition, the antinuclear antibody (ANA) tests that are positive in SLE are usually negative in DLE.

Oftentimes the only treatment needed is to keep the dog out of a lot of sunlight, or at least out of sunlight during the middle of the day. Sunscreens without zinc oxide can help. Of course, dogs may want to lick the sunscreen off, so keep an eye on the dog when you use it. Use sunscreen made for dogs, because the sunscreens made for people contain ingredients (particularly zinc oxide) that are poisonous if ingested. Topical corticosteroids can be used if needed. Severe cases may require the use of oral corticosteroids, such as prednisone, or immunosuppressive medications such as azathioprine. Oral vitamin E and omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids can help, but several months of treatment are needed with those supplements before any effect can be seen.

Like SLE, treatment is life long, although DLE can have a long remission time during which sores donít occur. Unlike SLE, DLE is not potentially fatal.
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Old May 24th, 2010, 10:28 AM
Longblades Longblades is offline
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Hope this gives a bit of comic relief to a serious post. I read the title as

Dog Picks Nose.
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