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  #1  
Old January 10th, 2008, 02:55 PM
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SaraiLovesLucy SaraiLovesLucy is offline
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7 week old puppy biting and growling...ALL THE TIME!

So im sure this has been posted b4 but i coulnt find a post similar to my problem

My beautiful 7week old puppy has taken to biting and growling ppl. She attacks my feet and pant legs and when i tell your "no!" she just bites down harder. My hands and feet look like i have just bought "the kitten from hell".. im all scratched up and i just dont know what to do to make her stop. I tried just putting her on "time out" to calm down but as soon as i let her out she is at it again! I tried grabing her snout and holding it shut while i say "no bite" but she just screams like im hurting her... ( Im not grabbing her hard at all.. i love her and would never hurt her) . I also just tried getting her to let go and saying "no bite"and giving her something else to chew on lke a toy that way she gets the idea that she needs to bite those not me. The problem seems to be getting worse. I know puppys bite and nip but she does it HARD and she growls at the same time...IF i pick her up to calm her down she just wiggles and growls and tries to bite... ( she has bitten my face and my chest.. not very fun)

Any advice?
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Old January 10th, 2008, 03:05 PM
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how much excerise does she get??

when you hold her muzzel and she starts to wiggle or crys what do you do??

why are you picking her up to calm her??

what do you do (reaction) when she bite or growls at you??
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  #3  
Old January 10th, 2008, 03:19 PM
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all typical and very normal behavior. a 7 wk old pup doesn't know bite inhibition yet. 7 wks is IMO too soon to leave the litter, so now YOU will need to teach her how to play appropriately.

when she bites - let out a loud YELP (just as another pup would do) and get up and walk away. ignore the pup. play is over when biting happens. she will learn, but it will take time, and repetition.

yelp and leave. yelp and leave.

if she is coming after you (or pant legs) gently scoop her up (do not say a word) and place her in a safe spot - i.e. a crate, or a confined area (x-pen) or a gated room. leave her for a min or 2, and let her out when she is NOT whining.

no need to hold her muzzle at all. it may have an opposite effect and make her scared of you, or scared of you touching her head which could lead to problems down the road.

try the yelp! and ignore first. try gentle and calm "time outs". praise her good behavior. give rewards for not biting and only using toys. and sign up for a puppy behavior class for socializing skills. it's worth every penny IMO.
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Old January 10th, 2008, 03:24 PM
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@SaraiLovesLucy

I have blue heeler crossed with sheppard lab and I have had a same problem until we started training himi to not bark .. i mean .. yes dog is your pet and yet it's a puppy but if you don't show him properly in the beginning what they can/can't do .. then they will use every possible chance ..

Also, you can take him out as much as possible because if they run out of energy, they will definitely not even think of barking
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Old January 10th, 2008, 10:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessi76 View Post
all typical and very normal behavior. a 7 wk old pup doesn't know bite inhibition yet. 7 wks is IMO too soon to leave the litter, so now YOU will need to teach her how to play appropriately.

when she bites - let out a loud YELP (just as another pup would do) and get up and walk away. ignore the pup. play is over when biting happens. she will learn, but it will take time, and repetition.

yelp and leave. yelp and leave.

if she is coming after you (or pant legs) gently scoop her up (do not say a word) and place her in a safe spot - i.e. a crate, or a confined area (x-pen) or a gated room. leave her for a min or 2, and let her out when she is NOT whining.

no need to hold her muzzle at all. it may have an opposite effect and make her scared of you, or scared of you touching her head which could lead to problems down the road.

try the yelp! and ignore first. try gentle and calm "time outs". praise her good behavior. give rewards for not biting and only using toys. and sign up for a puppy behavior class for socializing skills. it's worth every penny IMO.

Exactly what I would have said .
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Old January 11th, 2008, 04:07 AM
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I also agree. A high pitched "Ouch" always worked for me.

Also, a border collie/beagle needs a ton of exercise and a well exercised puppy is a tired and well behaved puppy.
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  #7  
Old January 21st, 2008, 10:06 PM
metoac metoac is offline
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7 week old pup nipping

Quote:
Originally Posted by SaraiLovesLucy View Post
So im sure this has been posted b4 but i coulnt find a post similar to my problem

My beautiful 7week old puppy has taken to biting and growling ppl. She attacks my feet and pant legs and when i tell your "no!" she just bites down harder. My hands and feet look like i have just bought "the kitten from hell".. im all scratched up and i just dont know what to do to make her stop. I tried just putting her on "time out" to calm down but as soon as i let her out she is at it again! I tried grabing her snout and holding it shut while i say "no bite" but she just screams like im hurting her... ( Im not grabbing her hard at all.. i love her and would never hurt her) . I also just tried getting her to let go and saying "no bite"and giving her something else to chew on lke a toy that way she gets the idea that she needs to bite those not me. The problem seems to be getting worse. I know puppys bite and nip but she does it HARD and she growls at the same time...IF i pick her up to calm her down she just wiggles and growls and tries to bite... ( she has bitten my face and my chest.. not very fun)

Any advice?
I recently had the same problem with my 7 week old lab. An artcle I read said that puppies that are removed from the litter less than 9 weeks old have a greater chance of nipping. They say that the puppies while still in the litter learn not to nip because when they do nip each other the one being nipped yelps and goes and hides. This results in the dog doing the nipping in not having anyone to play with in the litter.
They suggest that when the dog nips you that you yelp! loud! and leave the pup alone for several minutes. The pup will learn that nipping results in loss of play time. I tried this and in 2 days I had the nipping under control!
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Old January 23rd, 2008, 07:00 AM
Miss Mille Miss Mille is offline
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Wink Do what the dog mother woul do - look into the air

Dear everyone,
Am new here - so pleased to meet you. I've had lot's of luck using Jan Fennels method (the book: Doglistener) who kindly uses what the wolves and leader of the pack use to calm their flock down.

You can read the book - esecialle i'd love to give you her 48 hours when you get a puppy in the house from her new book - seven ages of a dog. but if you want to try the method out quickly here's a start:

Jan fennels point is to show he puppy you are the new and gentle leader - in the most calm and quiet way, like a big leader og mother dog does (notice older dogs how they react to you puppy by putting thei nose up in the air and looking away - this is their way of saying calm down little one - no need to worry - we're bigger older and higher and we're not worried)
Take you and your puppy into a room with nothing on the floor (the hall or anywhere). No distractions i mean.

Sit down and leave you wonderful pup alone. Since your dog doesn't understand humanlanguage you can copy the signal of a mother/leader by telling it - you can go to sleep - don't worr about a thing - i'm you boss and I take care of you.
You must do this by taking you chin up and eyes away from the dog. This might take anything from 2 minutes to 3 hours. Probably around 30-40 minutes if your pup has gotten a bit worried about who's taking care of things in the house (lifting them up shows them that they DO have something to worry about - it enforces their anxiety, growling etc)

Puppy reaction:
Probably first sniffing around
Then trying to jump up at you (DONT SAY A WORD - SHOW THE PUP EVERYTHING IS COOL BY GENTLY PUSHING IT AWAY THE SECOND IT TRIES TO TOUCH YOU - NO TALK - NO EYE CONTACT - CHIN UP)
Your pup might now start to whine - what's going on (DONT SAY A WORD DONT LOOK - A MOTHER SHOWS LOVE BY REASSURING THIS WAY)
THen it might start to growl and even bark at you (OK THIS IS WHERE I CANT HELP GIGGLE - THIS MEANS YOU HAVE A STRONG WILLED PUP WHO ACTUALLY THINKS HE's THE BOSS)
You pup may lie down (THIS IS OFTEN A FIRST TRICK - IF YOU TOUCH NOW ITMIGHT JUMP UP AND START AGAIN)
Your pup might get up and down 1-9 nine times
Suddenly your pup will give up and lie down - completely flat with its whole body from tail to head. (THIS IS IT - HE/SHE HAS GIVEN UP)
Wait five minutes.
Call and have a cuddle. Your puppy is now happy and relaxed and not growling or biting.

If youwant the full benefit of this there are more steps and things you do every day - all the dogs life. But you get so used to doing them - that it just seems so easy - in my opinion.

I'm really interested to hear how it goes - i did it with my pup and its six siblings when they were 7 weeks old. Some took ten minutes. Others - the alfa maile - took 45 minutes. They all slept for hours afterwards and the house became calm and happy. The point is to repeat the process, but the first time you do it is by far the most important.

Also this proces saved my last dogs life - a rescue dog with severe anxiety problems. It would have had to be pt down as a 1 year old if it hadn't been for Jan Fennel. It made it to three - and this was all Jan Fennels doing.
As we say in Denmark - good wind - meaning - may the luck follow your moves.
BEST Miss Mille (my wonderful new 9 month dogs name - a dog who does alle the doggy annoying things, but isn't at all a problem like my last one)
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Old February 26th, 2009, 08:50 PM
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Avro Arrow Avro Arrow is offline
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Hello all, this is our first post and our first pup.

We’re committed to doing the right things to train this new member of our family. We’ve crate trained him already and we’re at that same biting and growling stage, with an eight week old pup. A quick Google search, led us here to this forum where we found some great advice.

We’ve now registered ‘cause we know we’ll be back.
Thank you all.
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  #10  
Old February 26th, 2009, 08:56 PM
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lUvMyLaB<3 lUvMyLaB<3 is offline
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i agree!!!!!!!!! 7 weeks is too young.. teach that if she uses her teeth the game is over!! play with her when she is in a calm state of mind, when she gets crazy. its over. she will learn that is she wants to play there are rules to follow, never use force, it will have the opposite effect.
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Old February 27th, 2009, 10:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Avro Arrow View Post
Hello all, this is our first post and our first pup.

We’re committed to doing the right things to train this new member of our family. We’ve crate trained him already and we’re at that same biting and growling stage, with an eight week old pup. A quick Google search, led us here to this forum where we found some great advice.

We’ve now registered ‘cause we know we’ll be back.
Thank you all.
LOVE your forum name--my guy loved the avro arrow and has always been p'od the program was stopped.

All the above advice is right--puppies have to learn bite inhibition, and OP's left the litter too soon so it is up to the new owner. Be consistent, pup will learn.
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Old March 1st, 2009, 10:39 AM
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Originally Posted by DoubleRR View Post
LOVE your forum name--my guy loved the avro arrow and has always been p'od the program was stopped.

All the above advice is right--puppies have to learn bite inhibition, and OP's left the litter too soon so it is up to the new owner. Be consistent, pup will learn.
Thanks, Arrow was taken so I had to come up with something quick, even if it did date me.

I must say we’ve had a remarkable improvement. I know it’s only been a couple days but there are five of us and we’ve been consistent throughout. We give a yelp and the game’s over! We stand up or get up on something, facing the pup with our nose in the air. It’s great to watch him come over and lay down in front of us.


Now he gets nippy at times which reminds me he needs to go out. I’m not sure if it was just a coincidence but it’s worked out well all around.
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Old June 10th, 2009, 11:23 AM
Tiredmom Tiredmom is offline
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7 week old gsd biting/nipping some growls......

Hi, I'm new to site and read about nipping puppy.....also read about 7 weeks too young to adopt, but I read Monk's of New Skete books and they recommend 7-10 weeks is prime for GSD puppies. Mine keeps nipping, have replaced our limbs for chew toys, and tried redirecting, holding muzzle briefly (which I guess will have the opposite effect, I hope a day and a half of that won't cause too much damage....) I read about sticking a finger into the mouth or pushing the hand into the mouth further.....obviously that doesn't work...I will try the yelping....and ignoring....yelping and ignoring. I hope this works, my 8 year old is terrified of her 'coming after him, even though she is only 14 lbs.....and I have a 2 year old, who doesn't care, but says, NO BITE really loud......Wish us luck, willing to hear if the yelping thing works from others....oh, and this morning she growled at me.....first time ever......(again, we've had her 2 days....)....she may be trying to become the alpha......
Advice please!
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Old June 28th, 2009, 10:54 AM
Lucy&Rocky Lucy&Rocky is offline
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Growling 8 week old Rottweiler pup

Hi,
My daughter's bf just got an 8 week old Rottweiler and the little fella is cute as a button! However, the beggar growls when he's resting, has a toy or is eating. When I went to visit and he growled at me, I held his muzzle looking him in the eye and I firmly told him "No!" and let him yelp a bit (I wasn't hurting him at all) and then I released him. He calmed down immediately and I rewarded him. He was nice to me after that. But now after reading all everyone's unique and reasonable-sounding advice, I feel I might have been wrong in my method. Is staring in a puppy's eyes wrong? My two dogs are very well behaved and I only had to use that sort of method a few times when they were the same age. Having said all that however, my daughter's bf is new to the doggy world and I wouldn't want to misguide him. I've already suggested he enrols the puppy in training course, which he has and the pup "Ruffles" will start at 3 mths old and he has already booked a first appointment at the vet.
However answers to my questions would so much be appreciated!
Great forum btw
Dani
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Old June 28th, 2009, 11:38 AM
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Rotties can be "chatty". What sounds like a growl can be "talking". Now, I am not saying that your puppy isn't growling - just that it could be something else.

I am not going to say whether your method of stopping his growling at you was right or wrong. Generally speaking, staring an unfamiliar, adult dog can be dangerous. But you are dealing with a young puppy. He doesn't need to challenge you for the alpha position - you ARE the alpha.

Thank you for pointing your daughter's BF in the right direction. Classes will be invaluable.
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Old May 31st, 2010, 06:26 PM
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I see some hope

I have a new 7 week old maltipoo puppy that I have had since she was 4 weeks old....I know its too early but mom was really tired of feeding and wouldnt lay still long enough to nurse. Bella has gotten to where she is now biting and growling not to mention showing teeth...this is while being held...she will attempt to nip at you and your clothes. I realize she is playing during that time but the teeth showing and growling/biting nees to stop!!! So Im going to start the no talk and put up....my only prob there is Ive always read that you dont want to associate their crate (yes she is crate trained) with punishment but only a safe place...so whats what? I need a little help...what Ive read here makes me feel better...I have done the yelping and it seems to work some but when she starts the wiggling and turning her head to bite while showing teeth is too late by then....
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Old May 31st, 2010, 09:18 PM
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Mom wasn't tired of feeding - she was weaning. By leaving the litter at such a young age, your poor puppy didn't have a chance to learn much of anything regarding bite inhibition or doggy language at all.

If you follow the advice already given, you should be able to get through this. Having said that - it is going to take quite some time and patience. I also STRONGLY suggest you find a puppy class to get your puppy in at 12 weeks old - preferably with a positive reinforcement trainer - as you are going to need plenty of help and hands on advice in the months to come.
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Old June 1st, 2010, 09:15 AM
sandsmom sandsmom is offline
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Yes I realize she was weaning.....she also seemed miserable...my friend would have to sit and pet mom just to get her to lay down long enough to nurse at all.
puppy classes? really? I wouldnt even know where to start with that around here.
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Old June 1st, 2010, 09:31 AM
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Where is "around here"?
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Old June 1st, 2010, 09:52 AM
sandsmom sandsmom is offline
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Im in the Charlotte area...Im sure there are some there but nothing close by I doubt...oh who knows maybe there are...Ive just never looked
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Old June 1st, 2010, 10:01 AM
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Check with local vets and rescue groups. Also - go online and google training clubs for your area.
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Old June 1st, 2010, 10:33 AM
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Are there any littermates left with mom at all? Can you have them spend some time together? Young puppies learn best from other puppies and well-balanced adult dogs. See if you can let her play with her littermates and spend some time with mom as well while you look into early socialization classes.
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Old June 1st, 2010, 10:46 AM
3265christine 3265christine is offline
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My little guiy does the same bitting growling bitting pant legs but only at me!!! not my husband. I have been trying everything! i guess the no and time outs take time..
he is 12 weeks just left his mom at 11weeks
why does he do it to me only ???
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Old June 1st, 2010, 10:53 AM
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Who does he spend more time with? Who feeds him? Who takes him outside? Who plays with him?
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Old June 1st, 2010, 11:23 AM
sandsmom sandsmom is offline
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Yes Lily is still with mom and they have played together ...this weekend as a matter of fact. They start doing it to each other but now reading this just lets me know thats the only way they can learn. I just dont want poor ol Bella to look like the mean one lol
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Old June 1st, 2010, 02:09 PM
3265christine 3265christine is offline
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Originally Posted by LavenderRott View Post
Who does he spend more time with? Who feeds him? Who takes him outside? Who plays with him?

me,me, me lol i work from home so i am home all the time.


but its working when he went to bite me i went ouch ouch and he stoped and started to lick me!!! (so cute)
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Old June 1st, 2010, 05:01 PM
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2sheltiesmom 2sheltiesmom is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandsmom View Post
I have a new 7 week old maltipoo puppy that I have had since she was 4 weeks old....I know its too early but mom was really tired of feeding and wouldnt lay still long enough to nurse. Bella has gotten to where she is now biting and growling not to mention showing teeth...this is while being held...she will attempt to nip at you and your clothes. I realize she is playing during that time but the teeth showing and growling/biting nees to stop!!! So Im going to start the no talk and put up....my only prob there is Ive always read that you dont want to associate their crate (yes she is crate trained) with punishment but only a safe place...so whats what? I need a little help...what Ive read here makes me feel better...I have done the yelping and it seems to work some but when she starts the wiggling and turning her head to bite while showing teeth is too late by then....
You just need patience, LOTS of it.
Crates ARE their safe place; according to our vets it goes back to before dogs were domesticated and stayed in caves, so you are right to not use for punishment.
Each and every time she does something you don't like, just turn your back to her and ignore her, don't talk, just ignore. Eventually she will make the connection that you don't like it. It is normal for her to want your attention - all the time, so you need to be the pack leader and establish rules.
The biting is "teething" for puppies, I used tiny ice chips for mine as it soothes and numbs the gums - it does work and make sure she has some toys like "Kongs" to chew on.
Hang in there!
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Old June 1st, 2010, 07:27 PM
sandsmom sandsmom is offline
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I get the ignoring part....some say immed put them in their cage without speaking....if I just turn and walk away she will follow...while jumping at the back of my legs sort of wrapping around them...so there you have nails and teeth lol
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Old June 1st, 2010, 09:31 PM
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Personally, I wouldn't use the crate for a time out. Not only because you want to teach the pup it's the safest place in the world, but because you have to physically interact with her after your yelp. You can't ignore if you have to handle her.

Can you place baby gates up to prevent the pup from following you? The best method that's worked here with pups is a yelp, look immediately away (head up and in opposite direction of puppy), and instantly remove yourself from the room for 2-3 minutes maximum, leaving the pup behind (walk over the gate, close the door behind you, etc). We've had quite a few ankle chewers here but with time and patience, the problem was nipped in the butt .

Quote:
Originally Posted by sandsmom View Post
They start doing it to each other but now reading this just lets me know thats the only way they can learn.
If one of them gets too rough and doesn't back away from the other pup when a yelp is heard, distract the puppies and give them a break. It's not the "only" way they can learn but having another pup to play with will help. More importantly, the puppies need other puppies/dogs outside of their litters to socialize with. Early socialization classes are the safest way to accomplish this.

I keep dropping this link everywhere but it's because it's truly invaluable for all new puppy guardians. Take your time to read through it carefully.

http://www.dogstardaily.com/files/AF...ur%20Puppy.pdf
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  #30  
Old May 5th, 2012, 07:39 PM
dsmolik dsmolik is offline
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puppy nipping legs

Hi,
I'm new to this forum - just registered. I need help! We live on an acreage in the Kootenay Region of southern BC. We have a 11 week old Gold Retriever, Jeanie.
Jeanie is everything we expected ....plus a bit more. No other problems except the biting and nipping legs. I've got to the point where I don't want to take her for a walk. We've tried so many methods as we know we have to stop this behaviour asap!
I've tried a whistle, a sharp yelp, ignoring, a distraction toy (on a hand held loop), etc. I've tried turning on her sharply, pushing her into a sit position and telling her "Bad" etc. You name it - I think we've tried it.
We know she needs a lot of exercise. She gets 3 walks a day plus lots of fetch and retrieve games. (I've lost 3 lbs!!!).
We hope for soe improvement. My question - should I stick to one method in hopes that consistency will help? I teach discipline classes for school teachers (positive reinforcement techniques... - you'd think I'd know what to do wih this little pup.)
Any help is much appreciated.
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