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  #31  
Old February 18th, 2007, 01:12 AM
S.A. blueticks S.A. blueticks is offline
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This is for all the people with hound problems

Hi Folks.
These dogs are very intelligent animals. All you need to do is spend lots of time with them. They can be a bit stuborn at times, but that is because you are moving to slow. They get bored very quickly with obidience stuff. Hunting is usually the only thing on thier brain. The quikest and most painless way to train your hound is to invest in a quality training collar. I use them and am very satisfied with the results, and regardless to what people say they dont hurt the dog I tried it on my arm before I put it on my hound. These dogs are very loyal companions if you treat them right.
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  #32  
Old February 18th, 2007, 01:24 AM
Prin Prin is offline
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Have you tried getting somebody else to jerk the collar on your arm while you lunge for a squirrel to see if that hurts?
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  #33  
Old February 18th, 2007, 10:42 AM
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OntarioGreys OntarioGreys is offline
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We had coonhounds growing they were used for hunting but were also pets, those days there were no pinch collars, or electric training collars, I did the training as a child, and they did learn to walk at heel without dragging me around.

Obedience training is the place to start, to teach leash manner and recall, and then you need to get you dog out for runs one or 2 hours daily, so you need to find a safe place for you dog to get out to get exercise but wait till you have mastered the recall,

for those that say that these dogs are not smart, some can be brilliant Duke the black boy, learned all his obedience commands in English, french, sign language, spelled out and I even did counting with him teach him to bark a certain number of times and return a certain number of items, training and lessons have to be daily and out in the field, when hunting they have to learn to follow directions at a distance, so believe me they are capable of learning, in the middle of a chase instinct will take over so you can't always expect them to listen in mid chase, but before and after they can follow directions even 50 yards away with training, you need to keep training fun and interesting meaning playtime with the dog, and trying to incorporated training into the play, it gives them more incentive to learn if they see it as fun.
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  #34  
Old February 25th, 2007, 11:03 PM
jp58 jp58 is offline
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bluetick coonhound questions

I am a new member as well...we are the proud owner of a 9 month old 85 pound and still growing bluetick coonhound....he is beautiful and smart but quite a handful on the days I can't spend a large amount of time playing and running with him..we are having some trouble with his manners inside because he doesn't realize how big and powerful he is and sometimes he knocks everything down in his path.. the gentle lead collar has seemed to help a lot with his pulling on walks.. I would love to be able to trust him more inside the house and others have suggested sending him to a board and train facility to help with his manners inside?? has anyone else had any experience with these training facilities? He is a member of our family and I am concerned about sending him to a new environment where I wont be. Any information would be great..
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  #35  
Old April 30th, 2007, 01:40 AM
judson judson is offline
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Bluetick independence.

Hello. I'm new on this site and was wondering if anyone could shed some light on my dog's personality.

Bella's an 8 month old Bluetick / German Wirehaired Pointer mix (though it seems much more bluetick). In general, she's all around a good dog. My girlfriend and I are trying to be very consistant with our training and have taken Bella to Obedience school.

My question has to do with her "happiness" and her desire to be around us. If we're gone for a few hours and come home, she's very excited to be around us, but she doesn't really want us to pet her for very long. She's very well exercised (multiple walks / runs / park every day and hikes on the weekends and doggie daycare on our long day of the week), but she's not interested in us petting her unless she's completely tired out. She doesn't really make eye contact for very long and doesn't come consistantly when we call her. We've been working on her recall, but it's pretty difficult when there are distractions.

Some friends of ours have Bella's sister and the two play often. The sister on the other hand, loves attention and will come up to you wagging her tail and stare you in the eyes until you're done petting her. Both dogs went to the same classes and I really don't think our households are drastically different. I have only had labs before so I'm used to the wagging bodies and utter euphoria they seem to experience when in the presence of their "great owner/s" (ha). I am just a little confused about the blank stares and lack of excitment from Bella. I understand the training can take a long time and be trying, but it'd be nice to know if others have had any similar experiences with these dogs being aloof and uninterested in attention/ affection.

Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated.
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  #36  
Old September 30th, 2007, 11:22 PM
Gracie's Mom Gracie's Mom is offline
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issues with cats

Hi, I rescued Gracie at about 7 months, and I've had her for about a year now. She is very obedient, rarely pulls on leash, has a rock solid "stay", etc. The only time I can't get a positive (or any) response from her was when she was in hunt mode. Until today. She's always been good with other dogs and cats, but today she decided to hunt my friend's new kitten. Even on leash, even on a sit/stay, there was nothing I could do to get her attention or break her stare from the kitten. Normally, on leash she's not in hunt mode, but today she was in hunt mode from the second she saw the kitten until we went home (about two hours!!). We spend a lot of time on this farm, and need to be able to trust her with just this one cat. Is there any way to convince her that just this one cat is not prey?? Any suggestions would be really appreciated. p.s. She is not terribly food or toy motivated. I haven't had much luck finding anything more interesting to her than hunting.
My best guess is that she's black and tan coonhound crossed with German Shepherd.

This is her (if I attached the pic correctly ):
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  #37  
Old October 10th, 2007, 10:20 AM
Dean55 Dean55 is offline
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On the topic of a BOARD AND TRAIN option in solving particular issues
having much experience with this realm I would
say that a balanced perspective is gained in understanding that a Dog can benefit greatly from such a program.
I have exerienced and can document the fact
that a dog can be "rehabbed" by placing the dog in a environment that is highly conducive to exposing and conditioning the dogs behavior so that the dog learns what is optimally reasonable and exceptable in simply being a calm,socialized,trained,and mannered partner.
It (obviously) then
becomes critical that the owner be given in depth instructions/education on how to maintain the dog in this desired state of mind by using the sound management,socialazation, and training methods that were used in reaching such a goal. So in short a dog can and does benefit from a board and train experience that uses proper process in managing,socializing, and training of the dog that also includes educating the human element keeping in mind that conditioning behavior is a on going and never ending process in maintaining a desired status.

Gracies's mom it all depends on the methods you use to divert or correct yours dogs behavior to not focus on the cat in any undesired way. Exactly "what" method in detail are you using to communicate to your dog that the behavior is undesired/unexceptable ???? The details are very important in helping provide suggestions as I deal (succesfully) with the issue of prey drive with cats regularly.



On the note of Adam... After doing just a little research I find the post referencing him is slanderous and should not only be removed from this forum but should possibly
be considered for legal action when considering the facts. I understand the concern for protecting our dogs from abuse
but this seems to have evolved into a blantant smear campaign that has engulfed innocent and caring people (such as the poster) into repeating inaccuracies that are extremely cruel and damaging to ones character...

just my opinion.


good day

Last edited by Dean55; October 10th, 2007 at 10:32 AM.
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  #38  
Old October 24th, 2008, 12:37 AM
hornetmom hornetmom is offline
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Talking Is there a way my daughter can have a kitten?

I have a, well I should say my 15 year old son has a bluetick coonhound, male, born feb 11,2008. I was wondering what the dog might do to a kitten. My 6 year old really wants a pet of her own because dog is way to big and shoves her around, or whips her with his tail when they play. I know he doesn't mean to hurt her but he still does. If she takes of running he chases and knocks her down and then sits on her until she screams at the top of her lungs "BO no bad boy, get off."

Any help is greatly appreciated. He has not been hard to train as far as house breaking, sit, lay and load. He does dig alot of holes though, maybe if I neuter him that might help?
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  #39  
Old June 30th, 2009, 11:19 AM
ToniWms ToniWms is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OntarioGreys View Post



We had coonhounds growing they were used for hunting but were also pets, those days there were no pinch collars, or electric training collars, I did the training as a child, and they did learn to walk at heel without dragging me around.

Obedience training is the place to start, to teach leash manner and recall, and then you need to get you dog out for runs one or 2 hours daily, so you need to find a safe place for you dog to get out to get exercise but wait till you have mastered the recall,

for those that say that these dogs are not smart, some can be brilliant Duke the black boy, learned all his obedience commands in English, french, sign language, spelled out and I even did counting with him teach him to bark a certain number of times and return a certain number of items, training and lessons have to be daily and out in the field, when hunting they have to learn to follow directions at a distance, so believe me they are capable of learning, in the middle of a chase instinct will take over so you can't always expect them to listen in mid chase, but before and after they can follow directions even 50 yards away with training, you need to keep training fun and interesting meaning playtime with the dog, and trying to incorporated training into the play, it gives them more incentive to learn if they see it as fun.
Hi, I have a 9 month old bluetick and I was wondering how is your dog doing now ... I have the same issue with mine now, he is not very polite inside our home ... I can manage him when I am there, but as soon we go out and he has to stay when we come back the house is upside down!
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  #40  
Old August 27th, 2009, 11:48 AM
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*bump missed moderated post*
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  #41  
Old September 8th, 2009, 07:51 AM
brecker brecker is offline
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I wouldn't "suggest" a coonhound to anyone that cannot sufficiently give these dogs "LOTS" of exercise, put up with the scenting/hunting instincts, and also loud barking/howling. These dogs were bred to be vocal while scenting in the field! It's not fair to lock these ones up in a house all day But, start with training classes!!!!

Last edited by brecker; September 8th, 2009 at 08:31 AM.
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  #42  
Old August 23rd, 2010, 02:51 PM
lough lough is offline
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Thinking about adding a rescue pup (Bluetick Coonhound) to our lives

Hi,
I'm new to this forum and we currently have a 9 yr. old Border Collie/Aussie mix female. She's a sweet girl and our only dog (Amy). We also have a 10 year old Senegal parrot.
We are thinking about introducing a 6 month old rescue Bluetick coonhound/mix to our household but don't want to create too much stress for our little furgirl (we've always been a one dog at a time family).

This pup is 6 mos. old and has been living with mom and sibs in shelter since shortly after birth. She is very sweet and seems pretty calm. I think she would adjust well to us. She would be an indoor dog and we have a fenced yard. I walk our Amy daily (at least 2 miles) so new pup would be walked daily, too.

How best can we introduce our Amy to new pup (Suzie) and help Amy adjust to Suzie presence into her domain?

Thanks for any suggestions!
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  #43  
Old September 27th, 2010, 10:57 AM
lisajanep lisajanep is offline
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coonhound owner

I just adopted a coonhound cross - we think he is a coonhound/lab mix, but he definately has more coonhound traits. We adopted him from a shelter when he was 4 1/2 months old, he is now 9 months. We absolutely love him, he is super close to us and actually very calm indoors... but we make sure we exercise him a lot, take him to offleash wooded areas and long walks/hikes. Luckily, when we've taken him into the mountains hiking, he has not shown any want to take off, he is great offleash and actually waits for us to catch up, perhaps this is because he is not pure bred? Who knows, but thankfully he seems to want to stick close-by.

Anyhow, we too have discovered that coonhounds are not like retrievers, they are much more difficult to train - some sites say they are more stubborn and want to do things their way, so will fight you telling them what to do. However, with perseverence and a lot of work, they do begin to accept the household rules and will listen to you. I have had a much harder time training him than my boyfriend, as I think often it's more difficult for women to be the alpha than men. But I have persevered and he is improving every day. So that I have control over him on leashed walks, because he's quite strong now, I use the "gentle leader", it's works great! Otherwise he can pull me over easily. It also gives me confidence that I have control of him when he freaks out about things like squirrels and skateboarders. Dave (our coonhound) also barks a lot at strangers, I believe this is also a hound trait. I know that for me, I really need to work on being calm and assertive and making sure that Dave recognizes me as the pack leader. It definately takes a lot of effort, especially w/ hounds, but I'm improving and so is Dave and he's turning into a fantastic dog! We have worked on teaching him to heal, on-leash and off-leash and he is doing great - everything takes patience though, it doesn't happen overnight, it takes work. Definately put him in some training classes and even have a couple of one-on-one sessions with a trainer to address specific issues, this is what I did and it has helped tremendously.

Good luck!
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  #44  
Old October 16th, 2011, 11:23 PM
JRas JRas is offline
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Smile Blue Tick Training Issue

I was reading some of the post's about the Blue Tick Hounds; I inherited a 9 month old from a family friend who had health issues.

I was having issue's with running for miles and not listening, even worse he is gun shy and will run three miles on a car back firing.

I started with a 50 foot rope, harness, leather gloves, and a cap gun, and lot's of dog parks.

The 50 foot rope I tied around my waste and the leather gloves are to keep your skin from being burned off. When Buddy got to 50 feet and pulled I just stopped until Buddy let off; then started walking again. Then started introducing the cap gun with the same outcome. Now he will run circles or trails around 50 feet, will stop, sit, and stay when told. I use him now after hunting hours to retrieve lost game in corn fields, he loves it and will run through anything once on a scent.

Walking I used at the suggestion of another hounds man to use a very small metal choke collar; this worked well and my 10 year old son can walk him with no worries.

I take this hound every where in the back of the truck, I made a hefty chain that ties to the harness and he can just get his head over the edge and he can stand on his front legs to look over the truck and bawl.

Now the not running out of the house part was the most difficult, and i had to resort to a very short use of a shock collar, with a vibrator. Now I have a hound that does not leave the yard not even for another animal. He just goes to the edge of the grass and will not cross the property line. And listens to everyone even my 6 year old son when told to sit and stay.

I will alway's own a hound from here on out great family, house dog, hunter, and very loyal. This being said don't come into my back yard without going through the front door. He is very protective and has only gotten more since he matured.

I hope this helps, great dog!!
JRas
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  #45  
Old November 4th, 2011, 01:51 PM
067734m 067734m is offline
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Hi All,

I have a (suspected) beagle coonhound mix. This is my first 'hound' dog and I've had similar training issues. We solved the pulling issue with this:

http://www.wiggleswagswhiskers.com/n...ll-harness.htm

It's a no-pull harness - easy to use - not as harsh as a head attachment. Our dog loves wearing it (synonymous with great walks/runs). It only took a day or two of training to see results! I was really impressed. I still use it for runs because you can use it as a regular harness (not all or any pressure on the neck for when that cat runs out of the bushes in front of us).

The one thing I have NOT been able to master is a solid recall! Our hound sticks to us like glue indoors, but once she gets that nose to the ground it's like nothing else exists. She comes when called like a pro when ON leash. But off-leash I'm getting nothing... I've tried everything: dry treats, wet treats, goldfish crackers, hot dogs, raw meat, dog whistle... Nothing can compete with her all those SMELLS. Any advice for this appreciated!
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  #46  
Old February 12th, 2012, 09:14 AM
azhuntitdown azhuntitdown is offline
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I have the same issues with my dog, they are a handful but very loveable.
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  #47  
Old February 12th, 2012, 05:57 PM
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hazelrunpack hazelrunpack is offline
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She's gorgeous, azhuntitdown! Love her eyes! Welcome to the board!
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