Go Back   Pet forum for dogs cats and humans - Pets.ca > Discussion Groups - mainly cats and dogs > General Forum for cats and dogs

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old January 7th, 2013, 01:43 PM
breezepup breezepup is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 9
Smile First time potential pet owner - need advice and help regarding dog breed choice

I never had any pets growing up as my sister and mom are very allergic to animals. I have been doing some research recently and have been looking to add a furry companion to my life. The chances are high that this will be a very long post, so please bear with me.

My original thought was to get a dog, but I am also completely open to opting for a cat if it will be happier and better suited to my lifestyle. My number one priority is the animals happiness. I have never had a pet, so needed some help deciding if I should choose a dog or cat, and if so, what breeds would be best. Please note that if I have been giving this a lot of thought, and If I choose to get a pet, I will be adopting from my local animals shelter.

I HAVE spoken to my landlord, and she will allow me to keep a pet as long as I clean up after it.

Here is some information about the way I live:
- I am a 20 year old female University Student.
- I have 2 roommates and we rent a sidestreet apartment in the city.
*I have spoken at great length to both my roommates, and both of them are open and completely willing/excited to add a pet to our home. It will, in a sense, be my pet as I will cover all of the expenses (to avoid future ownership conflict) but it will fall under all of our care. *
- Every morning, I wake up early and run for an average of 20 minutes (with the exception of rainy days and snowstorms)
- The majority of my classes are in the morning.
- I work as a waitress in the evenings (monday through saturday)
- I am home in the early afternoon for about 2 hours before work, and I am home at night.
- Between all three of us, someone is usually home and available for animal care.
- We have A LOT of visitors between the three of us.

Here is what I would be looking for in a dog:
- Small enough but not toy (high priority)
- Relatively quiet
- Relatively low-maintanence (minimal shedding)
- Jogging companion
- Friendly and can get along with lots of people.
- Good with kids (thinking about the future here)
- Enjoys activity (maybe one that can swim?)
- Intelligent and easy to train.

Remember, I would also be completely open to having a cat, but since I live in the city, I guess it would have to be an indoor cat. This is why I'd prefer a dog, because I think a cat would be sad cooped up inside.

As for dog breeds, I have been researching some of the following: Beagle, Boston terrier, French bulldog, Corgi, Pug, Puggle, American Eskimo and the Alaskan Klee Kai, mostly because of it's sheer beauty. Remember, nothing that sheds excessively. I would be open to other recommendations as well!

If one of the breeds I mentioned above is known for many health problems, please let me know!!

If I get some good suggestions and reasoning, I'll talk about them with my roommates. Then, even though I've done some research on bringing home puppies, I'll probably create a new topic about all the things I should look out for that have accordance with preparing my home, vet bills, food bills, grooming issues, supplies, etc...

Thanks for taking the time to read through this very long message!!

Last edited by breezepup; January 7th, 2013 at 05:43 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old January 7th, 2013, 04:16 PM
Marty11's Avatar
Marty11 Marty11 is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: East Gwillimbury, ON
Posts: 1,138
Hello and Welcome. Most of those dog breeds you mention will not jog very far...... What about a terrier of some sort? Very high energy but fun. A cat is definately easier to have, but remember they can be hard on your furniture if they are scratchers. Adopting is a fabulous idea too. Most good shelters can recommend a dog for your lifestyle. Good luck in your findings.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old January 7th, 2013, 05:29 PM
breezepup breezepup is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty11 View Post
Hello and Welcome. Most of those dog breeds you mention will not jog very far...... What about a terrier of some sort? Very high energy but fun. A cat is definately easier to have, but remember they can be hard on your furniture if they are scratchers. Adopting is a fabulous idea too. Most good shelters can recommend a dog for your lifestyle. Good luck in your findings.
I found a list of terriers, and one by one I researched them on
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com
I found that most of them had longer fur, so would that mean more shedding and excess grooming and brushing? I hate to admit it, but I am on a budget, so I can handle "shedding seasons" and brushing weekly, but I can't afford excessive grooming bills.

In their breed descriptions, it seem that most of them fit the bill for the general behaviour types I was looking for, friendly around lots of people, active and playful. I have, eliminated, so to say, my first list, and am now quite interested in terriers.

I actually have a list of the ones I seemed particularly interested in, but I have a major question here:
Is there a health difference in the dogs from breeders and from shelters? If I chose to get one from a breeder, I'm worried about the dog being overly inbred, resulting in health issues.

Also, could someone please give me an approximate price for adopting a dog from the shelter and from a breeder?

I have one final question: When you go into a shelter (I've never been in one before) can you tell a person there what breed you're looking for, or are they all mixed-breed? And will the person there tell you what to do when you take your puppy home??
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old January 7th, 2013, 05:33 PM
Barkingdog Barkingdog is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 2,948
Quote:
Originally Posted by breezepup View Post
I never had any pets growing up as my sister and mom are very allergic to animals. I have been doing some research recently and have been looking to add a furry companion to my life. The chances are high that this will be a very long post, so please bear with me.

My original thought was to get a dog, but I am also completely open to opting for a cat if it will be happier and better suited to my lifestyle. My number one priority is the animals happiness. I have never had a pet, so needed some help deciding if I should choose a dog or cat, and if so, what breeds would be best. Please note that if I have been giving this a lot of thought, and If I choose to get a pet, I will be adopting from my local animals shelter.

I HAVE spoken to my landlord, and she will allow me to keep a pet as long as I clean up after it.

Here is some information about the way I live:
- I am a 20 year old female University Student.
- I have 2 roommates and we rent a duplex in the city.
*I have spoken at great length to both my roommates, and both of them are open and completely willing/excited to add a pet to our home. It will, in a sense, be my pet as I will cover all of the expenses (to avoid future ownership conflict) but it will fall under all of our care. *
- Every morning, I wake up early and run for an average of 20 minutes (with the exception of rainy days and snowstorms)
- The majority of my classes are in the morning.
- I work as a waitress in the evenings (monday through saturday)
- I am home in the early afternoon for about 2 hours before work, and I am home at night.
- Between all three of us, someone is usually home and available for animal care.
- We have A LOT of visitors between the three of us.

Here is what I would be looking for in a dog:
- Small enough but not toy (high priority)
- Relatively quiet
- Relatively low-maintanence (minimal shedding)
- Jogging companion
- Friendly and can get along with lots of people.
- Good with kids (thinking about the future here)
- Enjoys activity (maybe one that can swim?)
- Intelligent and easy to train.

Remember, I would also be completely open to having a cat, but since I live in the city, I guess it would have to be an indoor cat. This is why I'd prefer a dog, because I think a cat would be sad cooped up inside.

As for dog breeds, I have been researching some of the following: Beagle, Boston terrier, French bulldog, Corgi, Pug, Puggle, American Eskimo and the Alaskan Klee Kai, mostly because of it's sheer beauty. Remember, nothing that sheds excessively. I would be open to other recommendations as well!

If one of the breeds I mentioned above is known for many health problems, please let me know!!

If I get some good suggestions and reasoning, I'll talk about them with my roommates. Then, even though I've done some research on bringing home puppies, I'll probably create a new topic about all the things I should look out for that have accordance with preparing my home, vet bills, food bills, grooming issues, supplies, etc...

Thanks for taking the time to read through this very long message!!
I would be careful about getting a cat , they're very clever and good at escaping from a house, and you said you have a lot of people coming and going. People will need to very careful in making sure they do not let the cat out. Standard Poodle loves to run , and swim they do not shed and are hypoallergenic dogs . They do need to be groomed a lot, they're great with kids and one of the smartest breed of dogs. It would be a good idea to have your pet have a microchip , most shelters do put one in the dog whenthey get adopted.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old January 7th, 2013, 05:54 PM
breezepup breezepup is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barkingdog View Post
I would be careful about getting a cat , they're very clever and good at escaping from a house, and you said you have a lot of people coming and going. People will need to very careful in making sure they do not let the cat out. Standard Poodle loves to run , and swim they do not shed and are hypoallergenic dogs . They do need to be groomed a lot, they're great with kids and one of the smartest breed of dogs. It would be a good idea to have your pet have a microchip , most shelters do put one in the dog whenthey get adopted.
I just checked out the standard poodle on the site I mentioned above, and it seems a little large for my space. I also seems prone to lots of health problems, and it seems to need lots of grooming and coat care and clipping and.. woah that's a lot. Although it is a beautiful dog, I can't afford lots of health problems.


EDIT: I have done some research based off of what Marty said about terriers, and am quite interested in the following:
- Smooth Fox Terrier

- Parsons Jack Russel Terrier
Does anyone have any experience with these breeds?

Last edited by breezepup; January 7th, 2013 at 06:16 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old January 7th, 2013, 06:00 PM
Barkingdog Barkingdog is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 2,948
Quote:
Originally Posted by breezepup View Post
I found a list of terriers, and one by one I researched them on
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com
I found that most of them had longer fur, so would that mean more shedding and excess grooming and brushing? I hate to admit it, but I am on a budget, so I can handle "shedding seasons" and brushing weekly, but I can't afford excessive grooming bills.

In their breed descriptions, it seem that most of them fit the bill for the general behaviour types I was looking for, friendly around lots of people, active and playful. I have, eliminated, so to say, my first list, and am now quite interested in terriers.

I actually have a list of the ones I seemed particularly interested in, but I have a major question here:
Is there a health difference in the dogs from breeders and from shelters? If I chose to get one from a breeder, I'm worried about the dog being overly inbred, resulting in health issues.

Also, could someone please give me an approximate price for adopting a dog from the shelter and from a breeder?

I have one final question: When you go into a shelter (I've never been in one before) can you tell a person there what breed you're looking for, or are they all mixed-breed? And will the person there tell you what to do when you take your puppy home??
You should have your landlord write you a letter saying it OK for you to have a pet. Most shelters will want to know if own your house or if your landlord allow pets. Did your landlord say how big a dog you can have, I would made sure your can get a dog over 25 lbs as most landlords do not like big dogs in their apartment. It can cost over $200 to adopt a pet and you'll need to bring the vet to for a check up , the dog may need to be wormed. I paid over $200 for Marty adoption fee . You can tell a shelter and say you would like adopt a pet that has to be given up and see if anyone is planning on bring a pet in . If the dog is right for you the owner can made plans with you and this will save you the cost of adoption fee. I did this but the dogs where older than want I was looking for. I hope you'll post a photo of your pet for us to see.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old January 7th, 2013, 06:25 PM
breezepup breezepup is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barkingdog View Post
You should have your landlord write you a letter saying it OK for you to have a pet. Most shelters will want to know if own your house or if your landlord allow pets. Did your landlord say how big a dog you can have, I would made sure your can get a dog over 25 lbs as most landlords do not like big dogs in their apartment. It can cost over $200 to adopt a pet and you'll need to bring the vet to for a check up , the dog may need to be wormed. I paid over $200 for Marty adoption fee . You can tell a shelter and say you would like adopt a pet that has to be given up and see if anyone is planning on bring a pet in . If the dog is right for you the owner can made plans with you and this will save you the cost of adoption fee. I did this but the dogs where older than want I was looking for. I hope you'll post a photo of your pet for us to see.
I did speak to my landlord about it, and she told me that I could keep a small dog as long as I clean up after it and it doesn't bark too much. I live in the city, but the part of the city I live in isn't a main business district, but a residential area with a bicycle path and a park with a dog run nearby, so it's easier for me to own a dog.

I like your idea about making arrangements with someone planning to bring in a pet. I didn't think of that, but it's a really good idea!!

I have most Sundays free, so I'll try to make arrangements to volunteer at the animal shelter to hopefully learn something for myself about caring for a dog, other than the stuff I picked up on the internet :3
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old January 7th, 2013, 10:16 PM
Barkingdog Barkingdog is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 2,948
Quote:
Originally Posted by breezepup View Post
I did speak to my landlord about it, and she told me that I could keep a small dog as long as I clean up after it and it doesn't bark too much. I live in the city, but the part of the city I live in isn't a main business district, but a residential area with a bicycle path and a park with a dog run nearby, so it's easier for me to own a dog.

I like your idea about making arrangements with someone planning to bring in a pet. I didn't think of that, but it's a really good idea!!

I have most Sundays free, so I'll try to make arrangements to volunteer at the animal shelter to hopefully learn something for myself about caring for a dog, other than the stuff I picked up on the internet :3
Yes ,I know you spoke to your landlord about having a pet but most shelters will want to talk to the landlord or have a letter from them . Anyone can say their landlord said it is OK to have a pet and that is not good enough for some shelters . The shelters do not want people to bring back pets and if do find a pet and the shelter can't reach your landlord by phone you may not get the pet you want. So it would really help to have a letter from your landlord that you can bring to the shelter. When I adopted my dog the shelter wanted to see my realtor tax bill , just saying I own my condo was not good enough .
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old January 8th, 2013, 08:22 AM
Marty11's Avatar
Marty11 Marty11 is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: East Gwillimbury, ON
Posts: 1,138
Jack Russell Terriers have the most energy in any breed almost.....but maybe a mix of this breed might be good. Sadly there are a lot of smooth fox terriers in the shelters. If you don't like the grooming than stay away from non shedding dogs. Just get a short haired one. The Boston is the best terrier in my opinion "I have one" however they could not go jogging. I also had the standard not miniature manchester terrier (looked like a dobie). That dog could run.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old January 8th, 2013, 08:50 AM
Longblades Longblades is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 2,150
I suggest NOT a puppy. Neither you nor your room mates has the time a puppy will require for potty training, socializing, crate training, puppy class and more training. A puppy will not be able to jog with you till it's about two years old. This is because you don't run a dog till it's joints are closed. You don't even want to leash walk on a hard surface like pavement too much at first. You could play with it off leash on grass though. A puppy will not be much different for you than being the single mom of a human baby.

Only two of the breeds, as adults, will be able to do much jogging with you, the Beagle and the Klee Klai. And a mere 20 minute jog once a day is not near enough exercise for either breed. Both those breeds are tough dogs meant to hunt all day or run at sled for long periods. You do not have the exercise time either of those breeds requires.

Terriers are not for the faint of heart and not for students who have never had any kind of pet let alone a terrier before. No matter how dedicated you intend to be it will be hard.

REally a large breed like a Newfy or Great Dane or Saint Bernard would be a better match for you, exercise needs wise. An adult.


I really think you'd be better with a cat. I have four cats and one dog. The cats alone need about 20 minutes of play time each a day. They'd like more, or they did when they were younger. Cats won't jog with you (well most won't, ) they practically potty train themselves, they are less likely to suffer from separation anxiety and scream when you leave the house without them. Your next landlord is more likely to accept your cat than a dog. Your next several landlords because cats can live 20 years.

REally, I think a cat is better. Dogs require a much greater time committment. I find people underestimate how much time dogs need. Even most cats want to be with you, play with you, interact with you, be with you far more than non-cat people imagine.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old January 8th, 2013, 11:13 AM
Digston Digston is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Saskatoon, SK
Posts: 167
My first thought was a Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever. Energetic and swimmers! Unfortunately, they don't match the 'small dog' criteria as they are generally considered to be medium. And yes, they do shed. I prefer the long haired breeds shedding over the short hair breeds. I have one of each and I find the long hair is much easier to remove from things (The short has an amazing ability to weave itself into everything). All of the 'hypoallergenic' dogs shed less, but do require trips to groomers.

Sometimes the best breed is no breed at all aka a mutt. Make trips through the shelters, meet their dogs and see if any just click. If you limit yourself you might pass over that one dog that 'was made for you'.
__________________
"He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion."
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old January 8th, 2013, 11:37 AM
Barkingdog Barkingdog is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 2,948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Longblades View Post
I suggest NOT a puppy. Neither you nor your room mates has the time a puppy will require for potty training, socializing, crate training, puppy class and more training. A puppy will not be able to jog with you till it's about two years old. This is because you don't run a dog till it's joints are closed. You don't even want to leash walk on a hard surface like pavement too much at first. You could play with it off leash on grass though. A puppy will not be much different for you than being the single mom of a human baby.

Only two of the breeds, as adults, will be able to do much jogging with you, the Beagle and the Klee Klai. And a mere 20 minute jog once a day is not near enough exercise for either breed. Both those breeds are tough dogs meant to hunt all day or run at sled for long periods. You do not have the exercise time either of those breeds requires.

Terriers are not for the faint of heart and not for students who have never had any kind of pet let alone a terrier before. No matter how dedicated you intend to be it will be hard.

REally a large breed like a Newfy or Great Dane or Saint Bernard would be a better match for you, exercise needs wise. An adult.


I really think you'd be better with a cat. I have four cats and one dog. The cats alone need about 20 minutes of play time each a day. They'd like more, or they did when they were younger. Cats won't jog with you (well most won't, ) they practically potty train themselves, they are less likely to suffer from separation anxiety and scream when you leave the house without them. Your next landlord is more likely to accept your cat than a dog. Your next several landlords because cats can live 20 years.

REally, I think a cat is better. Dogs require a much greater time committment. I find people underestimate how much time dogs need. Even most cats want to be with you, play with you, interact with you, be with you far more than non-cat people imagine.
I agree with you about people underestimating how much work and time a dog need and this is why so many dogs end up in shelters. I can't see jogging with Beagle as they're hunting dogs and like to keep their nose to the ground all the time. I can picture a jogger being pulled all over the place with a Beagle. We had one growing up and Rum never took his nose off the ground. They're very sweet dogs and they love to howl and may not be the best dog for apartment for this reason. I see what you are saying about a cat being better, but people will have to really be careful about not letting the cat out. The OP said she and her roommates have visitors a lot and people do not always realize a cat is missing as they like to hide a lot. Maybe the cat could have a bell on it collar so people will know where it is.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old January 8th, 2013, 12:09 PM
marko's Avatar
marko marko is offline
Administrator - Pet lover
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Montreal Quebec Canada
Posts: 11,274
I have seen quite a few Boston terriers that have loads of energy. I'm no expert on the breed but based on what i have seen I think it could jog for 20 min.....
They are prone to overheating in hot and cold temperatures though. Their flat faces can also cause some breathing issues - but the ones I have seen have been very very active.

Marty11 - besides your BT, do u know of others that couldn't handle a 20 min jog?
__________________
Please tactfully EDUCATE or IGNORE posters you don't agree with.
Please PM me & Include URLs and post #'s for any issues and it's my pleasure to help.
I'm firm - but fair. Mind the Rules and enjoy your stay.
Newcomers FAQ - How do I post on this BB?
Pet facebook group
Check out the Pet podcast
Follow me on Twitter
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old January 8th, 2013, 12:17 PM
Barkingdog Barkingdog is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 2,948
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/bostonterrier.htm


Boston terrier get SOB easy so they would not be the best dog for jogging.



http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/jog.htm This is a list of pure breed dogs that are best to jog with
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old January 8th, 2013, 12:26 PM
Rgeurts's Avatar
Rgeurts Rgeurts is offline
Senior Contributor
Tetris Champion, Cell-Out Champion
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 1,964
I would stay away from a Jack Russell. They shed terribly and can be quite the barkers. They're wonderful little dogs and insanely intelligent, but not fitting for what you have described (or seem to need).

As for breeder vs shelter, it's a crap shoot either way. I, personally, don't support breeders. There are far too many dogs that die needlessly everyday. That being said, the choice is yours

Now, for the purebreds! Just to give you an idea, my baby came from a breeder (we did not purchase him from the breeder ourselves, we obtained him from a couple who did) and we have spent over $35,000 in vet bills... and he's only 2.5 yrs old. That's not to say that all purebreds have issues, but many do, and due mainly to irresponsible breeding and over-breeding.

Shelters: You would be amazed at the amount of purebreds in shelters. You would have to check with your local shelter if you're looking for a specific breed, but another great option is a rescue. Many rescues have purebreds and there are also breed-specific rescues. Those are wonderful places to start in your search.

One thing you need to be aware of is that any dog can have medical issues. Mutts, purebreds (even from responsible breeders)... they can all develop problems. You have to take that into consideration when getting a dog. You many not want a dog with health issues, but that may just be what you end up with. When you do decide on a dog, google it for known health issues. The northern breeds, like the Alaskan Klee Kai, are prone to immune-mediated issues like Hypothyroidism (Epilepsy typically goes hand in hand with the Hypothyroidism, but not always). Klee Kai's also, for reasons unknown, seem to develop liver and kidney diseases. I wanted one for quite some time, they're just adorable! But after having Malamutes, and the issues with both that I've had, I probably won't get another. They are also very prone to cancer. And being that the Klee Kai shares the genes, I would imagine they may be as well? Whatever you decide on, just do your research (which it seems like you are doing!), and keep in mind that any dog, at any time, can develop health issues that require large vet bills. Get pet insurance! Trupanion is a great one to go with. Here in Canada, they are less expensive and cover more than the ones my husband and I researched. They are also, as far as I know, the only ones to cover congential issues and have no lifetime maximum limit. Our sweet Nookie had his first seizure at 2.5 months old. We were in the process of getting insurance when it happened, so we were out of luck and have had to pay for all his expenses. Our shelter puppy has insurance and with all the issues that seem to be "the norm" these days, I would not have another without having insurance

Good luck!

Robyn

Oh, one more thing... if you do decide on a Klee Kai, stay away from the reds! Red in any breed is a recessed gene, but in breeds where it isn't a common color and is specifically bred for, it can cause issues like the ones our Nookie has. Thanks to our wonderful vet (she wrote a paper on the "Red" gene and issues it causes), we will avoid them, as beautiful as they are
__________________
"Obey my dog!" - Mugatu

"Who can believe that there is no soul behind those luminous eyes!" ~ Theophile Gautier


"Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole" - Ok... whoever said this has never had a sick or special needs baby. They ARE our whole life!

R.I.P. my sweet, handsome Thorin. You are missed dearly Dec. 25, 1999 - Mar. 4, 2012

Last edited by Rgeurts; January 8th, 2013 at 12:38 PM. Reason: To add info
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old January 8th, 2013, 05:07 PM
breezepup breezepup is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Longblades View Post
I suggest NOT a puppy. Neither you nor your room mates has the time a puppy will require for potty training, socializing, crate training, puppy class and more training. A puppy will not be able to jog with you till it's about two years old. This is because you don't run a dog till it's joints are closed. You don't even want to leash walk on a hard surface like pavement too much at first. You could play with it off leash on grass though. A puppy will not be much different for you than being the single mom of a human baby.

Only two of the breeds, as adults, will be able to do much jogging with you, the Beagle and the Klee Klai. And a mere 20 minute jog once a day is not near enough exercise for either breed. Both those breeds are tough dogs meant to hunt all day or run at sled for long periods. You do not have the exercise time either of those breeds requires.

Terriers are not for the faint of heart and not for students who have never had any kind of pet let alone a terrier before. No matter how dedicated you intend to be it will be hard.

REally a large breed like a Newfy or Great Dane or Saint Bernard would be a better match for you, exercise needs wise. An adult.


I really think you'd be better with a cat. I have four cats and one dog. The cats alone need about 20 minutes of play time each a day. They'd like more, or they did when they were younger. Cats won't jog with you (well most won't, ) they practically potty train themselves, they are less likely to suffer from separation anxiety and scream when you leave the house without them. Your next landlord is more likely to accept your cat than a dog. Your next several landlords because cats can live 20 years.

REally, I think a cat is better. Dogs require a much greater time committment. I find people underestimate how much time dogs need. Even most cats want to be with you, play with you, interact with you, be with you far more than non-cat people imagine.
I couldn't get a large dog because I'm afraid my house just isn't big enough. I would want it to be happy. I am also not looking to adopt a really really young dog, I'll probably get one that's at least a couple of months old, and I won't expect it to be able to jog with me until it's older.

In my research, I found a 6 week long puppy training class that's run just a 15 minute walk from my place, and would be planning to take it to those classes.

Also, I think you misunderstood my exercising habits
Every morning, I wake up and jog for minimum 20 minutes. Either me or one of my roommates comes home for lunch, so that's another 15-20 minute walk. When I get home from school, I usually have about 2 hours before work, enough for the longest walk of the day, probably 40 minutes (the walks will get longer as the dog gets older). You may have seen me write that I live in a residential area, not the center of the city, so there are parks nearby, one with a nice dog run! Finally, after work I get home and would take him/her out for a short walk before bed. Also, My Sunday afternoons are completely free, and there is a big park with a lake outside the city that's about a 30-40 minute drive from my house, which is why I was interested in a dog that could swim, because in the summer the water's really nice. There is a section that is cut off from the public beach that is large but fenced in, allowing dogs to run free and swim as they please. Don't worry, I will purchase one of those doggie life-vests.

I would be completely open to having a cat, but there are lots of cars in the area that I live, and we have tons of visitors coming in and out between the three of us, so I'd be worried about the cat escaping.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old January 8th, 2013, 05:28 PM
breezepup breezepup is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Canada
Posts: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty11 View Post
Jack Russell Terriers have the most energy in any breed almost.....but maybe a mix of this breed might be good. Sadly there are a lot of smooth fox terriers in the shelters. If you don't like the grooming than stay away from non shedding dogs. Just get a short haired one. The Boston is the best terrier in my opinion "I have one" however they could not go jogging. I also had the standard not miniature manchester terrier (looked like a dobie). That dog could run.
Aww, they're so cute!! (the manchester) The miniature one is more the size that I'm looking for. I'm trying to keep it at about 30cm, although a bit higher's not a problem.

I don't mind grooming, as long as it's just brushing and the occasional wash. I'm not looking for a dog that constantly needs its fur clipped by a groomer, which is why I was impressed with the fox terrier. They are also so adorable!
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old January 8th, 2013, 07:15 PM
Marty11's Avatar
Marty11 Marty11 is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: East Gwillimbury, ON
Posts: 1,138
The miniture is not at all the same dog. It's kinda nervous like some of the toy breeds can be. The standard is only about 25 lbs. The females a bit smaller. You can see in my avitar pic.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old January 8th, 2013, 07:18 PM
Marty11's Avatar
Marty11 Marty11 is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: East Gwillimbury, ON
Posts: 1,138
My Manchester

"Rookie"
Attached Images
 
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old January 9th, 2013, 10:37 AM
Barkingdog Barkingdog is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 2,948
Quote:
Originally Posted by breezepup View Post
Aww, they're so cute!! (the manchester) The miniature one is more the size that I'm looking for. I'm trying to keep it at about 30cm, although a bit higher's not a problem.

I don't mind grooming, as long as it's just brushing and the occasional wash. I'm not looking for a dog that constantly needs its fur clipped by a groomer, which is why I was impressed with the fox terrier. They are also so adorable!
http://dogtime.com/dog-breeds/fox-terrier

fox terrier need a lot of exercise and they're digger so you have to be careful about leaving them outside as they could dig their way out of a yard. My dog is part terrier and he loves to dig. He would dig the whole yard if let him.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Forum Terms of Use

  • All Bulletin Board Posts are for personal/non-commercial use only.
  • Self-promotion and/or promotion in general is prohibited.
  • Debate is healthy but profane and deliberately rude posts will be deleted.
  • Posters not following the rules will be banned at the Admins' discretion.
  • Read the Full Forum Rules

Forum Details

  • Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
    vBulletin Optimisation by vB Optimise (Reduced on this page: MySQL 0%).
  • All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:09 AM.