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Old March 6th, 2012, 06:09 PM
kmarieking kmarieking is offline
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Stray cat keeps mine agitated and meowing all night- Help!

I am the proud mommy of a non-neutered adult male cat. We think he is around two years old, but we're not sure. He was a stray that we took in over a year ago and he has the most amazing personality of any pet I've ever had the pleasure of meeting. He is a strictly indoor cat and we do not want to neuter him, as we've decided we may want to breed him one day so we can have more cats with his striking look and loving demeanor. He hasn't displayed any behavioral problems whatsoever until recently.

A couple of weeks ago I met a beautiful pregnant female cat who is a stray here in my complex. I cannot adopt her (she's met my cat twice and they do NOT get along, she's quite mean to him even though he is a perfect gentleman), but I still feed her and give her water whenever I see her. Now she follows me home and will come to my balcony in the middle of the night when she is hungry. I am happy to feed her.

The problem is, she hangs out on my balcony at all hours of the night and my cat goes CRAZY meowing and howling whenever she's outside. I cannot stop her from getting onto the balcony. I also cannot stop my cat from screaming whenever she's around, and I am losing so much sleep over this behavior I don't know what to do. I've tried keeping him in my bedroom with me so he can't see her on the balcony, but my bedroom door doesn't have a lock and he's clever enough to open it within a few minutes. I close the blinds in the living room but he'll still jump in the window and see her. The only other room with a door is the bathroom, but it's far too tiny to lock him, his litter box, and his food and water bowls in there for 8 hours a night.

Usually when I wake up to him howling I'll shout "Shhh!" and he will stop, but a few minutes later he's back at it. I've read that responding to his behavior will only increase it, and I can't afford to make things worse. He gets so loud that I am afraid my neighbors hear him in the middle of the night, and I don't want to cause problems with my living situation. He only screams like after meals until I pick up his dirty dinner plate (yes, I am his maid and he knows it), and when he sees this stray cat outside. I actually don't mind when he screams at me from the other room to let me know he's done eating, but he'll go on for hours in the middle of the night and I'm at my wit's end. On the nights she doesn't come to the balcony he doesn't meow or howl at all, but lately she's been coming around a lot. Please, if you've got any advice on how to quiet him down when he sees this stray outside, let me know.

Interestingly, there have been a couple of times during the day when I open the front door with the stray outside and my boy inside (only when I'm able stand right next to him and supervise him closely). He'll sniff the air around her but he doesn't try to go after her in any way. In fact I think he's a bit afraid of her, as she's growled at him a few times before. He just likes to sniff around the door where her scent is. Help!
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Old March 6th, 2012, 07:28 PM
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NoahGrey NoahGrey is offline
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first...please get your boy neutered. There are too many animals in shelters awaiting homes. Please, take the pregnant stray cat to a shelter or if you know someone who is really to give this kitty a home and where she can have her babies in a warm safe environment and not outside. I work as an Animal Protection Officer and see this everyday.
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Old March 6th, 2012, 09:06 PM
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+1

I agree.......
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Old March 6th, 2012, 10:56 PM
TokyoParrot TokyoParrot is offline
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I doubt you'll be able to breed your cat's personality into any kittens, especially from the father's side, because the father is usually hands-off. (Hopefully someone with more experience in that area can chime in here.)

If you have human children (or brothers and sisters!), you'll know that even with people, you can't predict personality from the parents, or even from each other. Most of us know human sib groups in which all 3 sibs are as different as can be.

Since the female comes up onto your balcony with ease and she is used to eating food you give her, first of all I would recommend contacting a local cat rescue group and asking to borrow one of their traps.

Someone on these boards based in the US can help you find such a group if you have trouble. Feel free to ask if you need help.

Alternately you can buy a trap.

Here is a page that has information at the bottom about where to buy traps:
http://www.animalnetwork.org/ANIMAL_...&StrayCats.htm
...plus other useful information at the top.

Females are notorious for not wanting to go in traps, especially if they are smallish/too narrow. So try to get a bigger one if you can.

The traps are surprisingly simple to use. In the case of females, some people suggest setting the trap in such a way that it can't spring shut for the first few nights, to get her used to the idea, just because they are so incredibly cautious.

How recently was she pregnant? If she is still nursing her kittens, the rescue group might ask you to wait to try to trap her. If she is still pregnant, they'll want you to trap her right away, obviously!

As for having more cats with your cat's beautiful looks and personality, you might want to pop in to one or two of the shelters to see what's there. One of the benefits of adopting a cat rather than having a litter (besides not adding to the cat population) is that you know what you are getting, as the cat already has a certain personality and appearance, whereas birthing a litter gives you no guarantees at all, in looks or in personality, especially from the father cat, who usually is hands-off in raising the litter.
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Old March 7th, 2012, 07:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmarieking View Post
we may want to breed him one day so we can have more cats with his striking look and loving demeanor.
Thousands of cats in shelters across North America will be killed today. That's millions every year. I wonder how many of them look striking and have a loving demeanor? Statistically, there's gotta be a few. By neutering your cat, you'll not only stop his annoying behaviour, but you won't be contributing to the massive cat overpopulation crisis. It's win-win for everyone!! And if you can get that female kitty somewhere safe before she has her kittens, you'll be actively participating in an extremely rewarding way that helps not only her and the kittens, but your neighbourhood, the environment, and future death row kitties.
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Old March 7th, 2012, 08:53 AM
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Love4himies Love4himies is offline
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What are you going to do if he starts spraying that wonderfully smelling un-neutered male feline urine that will stink up your home so fast you won't know what hit you? Will you still think your un-neutered male is the sweetest kitty around and shouldn't be neutered?

As others have said, there are millions of cats with your cat's beautiful looks and personalities to match that get killed every year in North America. Do those homeless cats a favour and try to get the homeless female spayed, and your male neutered. You would actually doing both of them a favour. AND it will probably solve your cat meowing problem .

TokyoParrot has given you some great ideas. Here are some more to assist you in trapping her if you choose to do so:

1. Cover the trap with a towel or blanket so the cat feels more secure.
2. Us smelly food, such as sardines to attract her.
3. If she is really hesitant, place the food just outside the trap door and over a few days, slowly move the food towards the back of the trap.
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Old March 7th, 2012, 09:20 AM
TokyoParrot TokyoParrot is offline
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What are you going to do if he starts spraying that wonderfully smelling un-neutered male feline urine that will stink up your home so fast you won't know what hit you?
I hadn't thought of that

If he starts spraying his "scent" around, you'll never get that out. That is a very, very, VERY big reason to neuter a male ASAP.

I'm not a cat person, only (?) have 3 (right now! ), but can some of the cat people help address this question-- if she does want to have kittens that are just like the father cat, how likely is it to be a success?

I've only had one litter (pregnant stray had 3 kittens in the middle of my bedroom floor once) and none of the 3 kittens were anything like the mother personality-wise, and were/are all very different from each other as well. I assume the odds of passing on the personality from the father are even less. What is everyone else's experience with this?

As for looks, I always think about the cloned cats that, even though they are CLONES, look nothing like the "parent". The news stories at the time said that the coloration patterns expressed themselves in very different ways even among 100% exact gene clones-- a huge disappointment to the people who were hoping that cloning would give them an exact replica of a beloved pet they had lost.

So unless the cat is a purebred with a distinct, unmistakable look (Russian blue mated with another Russian blue, American shorthair mated with another AmeShort), it is really a bit of a crap shoot, no? Kind of thinking aloud here, but what is everyone's experience with that?
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Old March 7th, 2012, 11:31 AM
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I've never bred on purpose, just had foster litters, but their personality really depends on genetics, environment and sex.

In one litter, I had 2 orphans out of 7 that were bred from another mother and father, and the whole litter turned out pretty much the same temperament as the mother (of course I have no idea what the fathers were like, or the mother of the 2 orphans). The only real difference between them was that a couple were more dominant.

In general, I find males to be more cuddly and social than females.
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Snowball RIP (1991-2005)

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Last edited by Love4himies; March 7th, 2012 at 12:16 PM.
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Old March 7th, 2012, 01:56 PM
BenMax BenMax is offline
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With all the abandoned cats in shelters and pounds, I still wonder why the heck people want to breed their animals.
Honestly, there are so many being gassed, electrocuted, shot and injected to end their lives. And these are the ways they are exterminated according to the law. I cannot even imagine the other horrors that end their existance by using other means.

And yes, the cat will start to spray very shortly. That is no fun trying to get rid of that smell.
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Old March 7th, 2012, 02:46 PM
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So the OP hasn't replied. I truly hope that she has come and read this thread. Please neuter your cat. I guarantee you can find a shelter kitten that will more than amply fill your wonderful kitties footprints. You will never, no matter what you try, replace your cat 100%, like humans each are individuals. Even identical twins can have separate personalities. Your boy will spray, he will howl, and the female will return. It's actually a terribly selfish thing you are doing here. For your peace of mind and sleep, and your neighbours, you really should be considering neutering. It will solve your problem.
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Old March 8th, 2012, 09:05 AM
kmarieking kmarieking is offline
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Thank you, everyone, for your replies. We will probably end up adopting another cat when we move into a bigger place, but we are also still considering breeding our cat on top of that. So no, we will not be neutering him any time soon. We've had him for over a year without any behavioral problems up until now, except for this howling over the stray cat. We don't feel right neuetered our cat as he has no physical interaction with female cats whatsoever, so we don't have to worry about kittens at this time. So unless he develops a medical condition that neutering would correct, he's staying intact. At least for the immediate future.

I think my best bet is to contact an animal shelter here to pick up this stray, as the past few days she's been spending 100% of her time on my balcony (except when she goes down to the courtyard to potty). She is Very pregnant and I suspect she'll give birth within the next week at most. Unfortunately there is only one local no-kill shelter in my city and they are overcrowded and undstaffed, but I don't see what other choice I have.
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Old March 8th, 2012, 09:33 AM
TokyoParrot TokyoParrot is offline
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If she's looking "very pregnant", then you're almost certainly very close to the birth. Like, next day or two.

If you are comfortable allowing the birth to take place on your balcony (which would be a helpful thing to do, as having them more in the open exposes them to getting picked off by crows and other predators), then you might want to put a cardboard box outside ASAP with a couple of blankets, or perhaps some straw-type bedding (which will stay "fresher" longer than a blanket, which will get matted pretty quickly and can't provide warmth when it is matted down at the bottom of the box). You can get straw-type bedding at a pet store-- it's sold for hamsters and rabbits.

If you can get the rescue group in there beforehand, that would be best, of course....

Instead of the no-kill shelter, do you have any rescue groups that might be able to help? They would try to rehome the babies, and the mother too if she appears able to be domesticated.

You might want to start a separate thread asking for help in locating a rescue group, putting your location prominently in the thread title. Alternately, maybe the no-kill shelter has a list and can give you some telephone numbers?
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Old March 8th, 2012, 09:40 AM
BenMax BenMax is offline
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All around TRAGIC situation on all levels.
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Old March 8th, 2012, 11:49 AM
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All around TRAGIC situation on all levels.
AMEN!

I KNOW you are not on this site looking for advice on neutering your male but please consider the following info........


Male cats that are neutered CAN’T get testicular cancer, and they live 40% longer than their unneutered counterparts.1 Unneutered male cats respond to the “call of the wild” and their desire to wander is fierce. Unneutered male cats may become aggressive toward other cats, increasing their risk of injury and becoming infected with feline leukemia and/or feline immunodeficiency virus. And don’t forget: unneutered male cats tend to spray urine, which STINKS!

Aside from the important medical reasons for spaying or neutering, there is also a serious overpopulation problem in the United States. An average cat has 1–8 kittens per litter, and 2–3 litters per year. During her productive life, one female cat could have more than 100 kittens. A single pair of cats and their kittens can produce as many as 420,000 kittens in just 7 years.2

Over 12 million unwanted dogs and cats are euthanized each year, and even more are abandoned.1 If you have any questions about spaying or neutering, please contact your veterinarian—the key resource for information about the health and well-being of your best friend.


As for this stray pregnant cat keeping yours up all night. IF his testosterone wasn't kicking in quite as much as it is with a female around then chances are he would not be acting the way he is. Intact males always react a lot more so to other cats than do altered males. It is NOT her fault she is in the situation she is. Most likely her callous owner put her outside when she was in heat so they could sleep at night without listening to her howls. Once they figured she was pregnant they weren't about to let her back in. Why do the responsible thing after all?
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Old March 8th, 2012, 11:55 AM
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Originally Posted by 14+kitties View Post
amen!

i know you are not on this site looking for advice on neutering your male but please consider the following info........


Male cats that are neutered can’t get testicular cancer, and they live 40% longer than their unneutered counterparts.1 unneutered male cats respond to the “call of the wild” and their desire to wander is fierce. Unneutered male cats may become aggressive toward other cats, increasing their risk of injury and becoming infected with feline leukemia and/or feline immunodeficiency virus. And don’t forget: Unneutered male cats tend to spray urine, which stinks!

Aside from the important medical reasons for spaying or neutering, there is also a serious overpopulation problem in the united states. An average cat has 1–8 kittens per litter, and 2–3 litters per year. During her productive life, one female cat could have more than 100 kittens. A single pair of cats and their kittens can produce as many as 420,000 kittens in just 7 years.2

over 12 million unwanted dogs and cats are euthanized each year, and even more are abandoned.1 if you have any questions about spaying or neutering, please contact your veterinarian—the key resource for information about the health and well-being of your best friend.


As for this stray pregnant cat keeping yours up all night. If his testosterone wasn't kicking in quite as much as it is with a female around then chances are he would not be acting the way he is. Intact males always react a lot more so to other cats than do altered males. It is not her fault she is in the situation she is. Most likely her callous owner put her outside when she was in heat so they could sleep at night without listening to her howls. Once they figured she was pregnant they weren't about to let her back in. Why do the responsible thing after all?
you are so right 14
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Old March 8th, 2012, 12:19 PM
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http://hermitagecatshelter.org/node/43

The Hermitage Cat Shelter is a not-for-profit 501(c)3 organization supported entirely by donations. We are dedicated to the shelter, protection, and care of homeless cats, especially those that are often not considered adoptable by other organizations. We are both an adoption facility and long-term sanctuary for those felines who are “adoption-challenged.” including felines who are FIV or FeLV-positive, and other types of chronic health issues. All of our kitties roam free within 8,000 sq ft of outdoor/indoor living space.

http://hopeanimalshelter.net/

HOPE is where the heart is
Welcome to HOPE Animal Shelter located in Tucson, Arizona. We are Tucson's only no-kill, community based haven for abandoned dogs and cats awaiting adoption. We believe that all animals deserve gentle care, respect, dignity and a loving home. HOPE Animal Shelter is a non-profit, mostly all-volunteer, 501(c)(3). We appreciate our volunteers and all who have donated materials and funds over the years. We couldn't do it without you. Please help support our cause.



http://www.adoptapet.com/adoption_rescue/69778.html

About Our Rescue Group
FAIR's Vision
To promote quality adoptions and improve lives for animals and their families until there are no more homeless pets in Pima County.

FAIR's Mission
The Foundation for Animals in Risk is a non-profit, no-kill animal rescue organization that is committed to:
* rescuing animals from kill shelters and finding them permanent homes;

* alleviating the suffering of animals caused by neglect, cruelty, and ignorance;

* educating the community about responsible pet ownership through our youth and adult volunteer programs;

* working cooperatively with reputable animal welfare groups in activities including, but not limited to, spay and neuter programs; and

* aiding law enforcement's efforts to investigate and prosecute crimes of animal cruelty.


Please contact one of these places to help with the pregnant stray before she has her kittens.

Here are some reasons to neuter your cat:

http://www.peteducation.com/article....1+2235&aid=910

Behavioral advantages of neutering

Decreased Aggression: The (male) androgen hormones, of which testosterone is the most important, are responsible for the development of many behavioral patterns. Testosterone greatly affects aggression in cats. One of the most important behavioral advantages of castration is that as adults, these neutered cats will tend to be less aggressive toward other cats.

Decreased Spraying: Spraying urine is a normal sexual behavior of uncastrated male tomcats. Anyone who has smelled tomcat urine will quickly agree that spraying is a very unwanted behavior. Some unspayed and spayed females, and some castrated males, will spray, but it is much more common in unneutered males.

Decreased Roaming: Another behavioral advantage of neutering is that neutered cats are much less likely to react when they sense a female in heat. Male cats can sense females in heat through pheromones. These are airborne chemical attractants that are liberated from the female when she is cycling. They travel through the air for great distances. Male cats neutered at an early age will generally not sense or respond to pheromones, and would certainly be less stressed and tend to stay home if they are outdoor cats.

Medical Advantages

There are numerous behavioral and medical benefits to neutering your cat.
Reduced Injuries: The biggest medical advantage to neutering cats is really related to their behavior. Unneutered male cats fight to defend their territory. Such fights can be extremely serious, as abscesses often develop from the bite wounds. The veterinarians at the Drs. Foster and Smith Veterinary Medical Facility have seen many tomcats who are missing parts of their ears and tails, or have faces with multiple scars resulting from the fights they had with other toms. Indoor, neutered cats lead much healthier and longer lives.
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Jasper, male Ragdoll ?? (approx 10 yrs)
Rose semi feral, a cpietra rescue, female tabby (approx 7 yrs)

Sweet Pea RIP (2004?-2014)
Puddles RIP (1996-2014)
Snowball RIP (1991-2005)

In a cat's eye, all things belong to cats.-English Proverb

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Old March 8th, 2012, 12:27 PM
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Great post as always, 14+


Quote:
Originally Posted by 14+kitties View Post

As for this stray pregnant cat keeping yours up all night. IF his testosterone wasn't kicking in quite as much as it is with a female around then chances are he would not be acting the way he is. Intact males always react a lot more so to other cats than do altered males. It is NOT her fault she is in the situation she is. Most likely her callous owner put her outside when she was in heat so they could sleep at night without listening to her howls. Once they figured she was pregnant they weren't about to let her back in. Why do the responsible thing after all?



If this one leaves, there will be another one to take her place and the howling will continue as long as the male is not neutered. It has been my experience that the smell of cats attracts strays and there is nothing smellier than un-neutered male urine.
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Cat maid to:

Jasper, male Ragdoll ?? (approx 10 yrs)
Rose semi feral, a cpietra rescue, female tabby (approx 7 yrs)

Sweet Pea RIP (2004?-2014)
Puddles RIP (1996-2014)
Snowball RIP (1991-2005)

In a cat's eye, all things belong to cats.-English Proverb

“While we are free to choose our actions, we are not free to choose the consequences of our actions.” Stephen R. Covey
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Old March 8th, 2012, 08:46 PM
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How old would you say the female cat is? If shes younger that your cat, maybe he's her father, which would make her a cat with a the great demeanor that you' wanted to copy. Now, if neutered and spayed, you can keep both, and if neutered and spayed, they'll probably get along fine.
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Old March 9th, 2012, 08:22 AM
kmarieking kmarieking is offline
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My cat is definitely NOT the father of these kittens; he hasn't been outside (except for in my arms when I carry him outside for fresh air) in well over a year so that's an impossibility

I appreciate all of you taking the time to write about neutering, but my partner and I have chosen not to neuter our cat at this time. Whether or not we choose to breed him, adopt other cats, keep him as the only cat in our home, neuter him in the future, etc. is our personal decision as pet owners and when the time comes to make that decision, if I need further information I will start another thread. All I am looking right now is how to stop his howling in the middle of the night.

Thank you to the above poster for providing links to places that may be able to help this stray.

And incidentally, the longer the pregnant stray has been hanging out on my balcony the less my cat seems to be agitated by her. As of last night he's down to meowing/howling on and off for about one hour, the rest of the night he's back to sleeping on the couch by himself or in bed with me. Whenever he would get too loud (loud enough to wake me up) I either gave him a loud "Shh!" or clapped my hands. He seems to have gotten the message that this behavior is not acceptable and he's almost completely back to his "old" self.
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Old March 9th, 2012, 12:29 PM
BenMax BenMax is offline
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Looks like you have everything figured out. That is great.
Good luck to you.
Good luck to the animals as well.
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Old March 9th, 2012, 01:43 PM
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Looks like you have everything figured out. That is great.
Good luck to you.
Good luck to the animals as well.
Couldn't have said it better!
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Old March 9th, 2012, 03:01 PM
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Couldn't have said it better!
I don't know what to say really. I am sitting here with one siamese X ragdoll that gave birth and then dumped at a kill shelter, and a 5 week old kitten that was dumped on the highway. I am fostering both of them just after I fostered and adopted out others. There is absolutely no end to this misery.

This whole subject makes me sick to say the least. There is nothing to say I guess then good luck with whatever it is that one wants to do. What more is there to say?

All I know is that I will continue to try and save these poor cats one by one if I have to. Many others on this forum have spent countless hours to try and rescue and save.
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Old March 9th, 2012, 03:42 PM
kmarieking kmarieking is offline
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Once again, I appreciate what everyone is saying about spaying and neutering, but I didn't come here to discuss that. I came to discuss how to stop a cat from howling in the middle of the night. I really don't appreciate feeling attacked or like I am the bad guy, getting thrown the unnecessary sarcasm like I'm not smart enough to "get it" when the bottom line is my cat has not sired any kittens, my cat does not have physical access to any females to sire kittens at this time, and what my fiance and I choose to do as pet owners shouldn't be attacked on a thread that isn't even about that. I guess in your eyes I'm still a monster, though.

My neighbor will probably take in the stray once she has her kittens (as long as she can get the stray acclimated to her dog and other cat), and she also knows some people who may be willing to adopt the kittens once they are old enough to be weaned. So there's the good news for you. Now that I've updated you all (because I know you all care *so* much), I am going to go ahead and close my account here as this was not the type of "support" I was hoping for.
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  #24  
Old March 9th, 2012, 03:46 PM
BenMax BenMax is offline
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Sorry you feel that way.
Anyways good luck to you and I really do hope the howling stops so that you can get some rest.
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  #25  
Old March 9th, 2012, 09:28 PM
lindapalm lindapalm is offline
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I did NOT mean your cat could be the father of the kittens, I meant he could be the father of the pregnant mother, which would give you another perfect cat if you adopted her.
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  #26  
Old March 9th, 2012, 11:09 PM
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sugarcatmom sugarcatmom is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmarieking View Post
I appreciate what everyone is saying about spaying and neutering, but I didn't come here to discuss that. I came to discuss how to stop a cat from howling in the middle of the night.
Except that the 2 issues are intricately linked, so you really can't discuss one without the other.
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  #27  
Old March 9th, 2012, 11:26 PM
TokyoParrot TokyoParrot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmarieking View Post
Now that I've updated you all (because I know you all care *so* much), I am going to go ahead and close my account here as this was not the type of "support" I was hoping for.
I too am sorry to see you go. I thought you handled yourself with perfect grace, poise, and class.

There are people on this forum who breed their animals, although they are definitely in the minority. I think the response you got was due to the fact that you sound like you are new to pet ownership and people wanted to chime in on something that they thought you should consider.

Everyone's thinking emerges from the experiences that they have had to date. Many of us have spent small fortunes and years of our lives trying to care for ferals as best we can and regularly pull animals out of shelters a day before they are about to be killed. So please don't judge the respondents too harshly. Everyone in the world sees the world through the filter of what we have been through to date.
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  #28  
Old March 10th, 2012, 02:07 AM
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Koteburo Koteburo is offline
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Location: Calgary, AB
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmarieking View Post
My neighbor will probably take in the stray once she has her kittens (as long as she can get the stray acclimated to her dog and other cat), and she also knows some people who may be willing to adopt the kittens once they are old enough to be weaned. So there's the good news for you..
Well at least I'm really glad this kitty angel is being taken care of and her kittens and for that I'm truly thankful to the OP even if I agree 100% with BenMax (and the rest) about the neuter/spay issue I'm not going to deny that.
How unfortunate that the OP closed her account in case you're still reading I thank you for caring for the pregnant cat and her babies.
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  #29  
Old March 10th, 2012, 01:22 PM
Etown_Chick Etown_Chick is offline
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Tokyo,
Excellent response.

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