Go Back   Pet forum for dogs cats and humans - Pets.ca > Discussion Groups - mainly cats and dogs > Dog training - dog behavior

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old October 19th, 2011, 03:20 AM
TanjaBelieve TanjaBelieve is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Slovenia
Posts: 20
Big dog in apartment?

Are there any breeds of dog that can live in an apartment? Ive heard that Samoyeds can live in apartments as long as they get a good amount of workout every day. Im just interested in more breeds of big dogs that you can have in apartment.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old October 19th, 2011, 04:31 AM
Melinda's Avatar
Melinda Melinda is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 5,248
as long as they get the exercise they need, any large dog can live in an apartment, grey hounds are couch potatoes, so are labs if taken out at least 3 times a day for a good run.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old October 19th, 2011, 06:57 AM
cell cell is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Montreal, QC
Posts: 586
Danes are also good apartment dogs. They tend to be calm indoors. Going through puppy stage with a large breed in a apartment might be difficult though.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old October 19th, 2011, 10:34 AM
Longblades Longblades is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 2,013
I've always wondered at those claims made that some giant breeds are good for apartments, (Newfs, Danes, Saints) because their exercise requirements are relatively low. They still have to go out to bathroom. And they do need some exercise.

So isn't it just that once you get them out they don't need to be out as long or go at it as hard as say a Lab? But they still need out. So to my mind it boils down to how much time the owner has to spend exercising and working with the dog and not how many times up and down the stairs or elevator to get out, it's how long you stay out that counts and that is not a factor of being in an apartment? Comments?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old October 19th, 2011, 10:55 AM
Melinda's Avatar
Melinda Melinda is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 5,248
exactly longblades as I was saying, doesn't matter where they lay their heads....umm bodies*L* as long as all their exercise requirement are met, and that is up to the owner.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old October 19th, 2011, 10:59 AM
Dog Dancer's Avatar
Dog Dancer Dog Dancer is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 6,530
House or apartment you need to take your dogs out to exercise them. As much as possible. Especially younger dogs. Large dogs can be very active - such as Malamutes, labs, etc., other large breeds are very content to be a couch potato (labs can fall into both categories). But regardless of them being "content" to sit in the apartment, they still need the mental and physical stimulation of outside training, socialization, exercise, etc. A tired dog is a good dog.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old October 19th, 2011, 11:45 AM
marko's Avatar
marko marko is offline
Administrator - Pet lover
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Montreal Quebec Canada
Posts: 11,010
Quote:
Originally Posted by Longblades View Post
I've always wondered at those claims made that some giant breeds are good for apartments, (Newfs, Danes, Saints) because their exercise requirements are relatively low. They still have to go out to bathroom. And they do need some exercise.

So isn't it just that once you get them out they don't need to be out as long or go at it as hard as say a Lab? But they still need out. So to my mind it boils down to how much time the owner has to spend exercising and working with the dog and not how many times up and down the stairs or elevator to get out, it's how long you stay out that counts and that is not a factor of being in an apartment? Comments?

+1 - 100% agree.

The only additional points i have to make is that...
1 - the temperature of the apartment might make a difference to a samoyed. We all know hot air rises so if there isn't any AC, your Samoyed may be very warm at certain times of the year. If this is the case, then a house with a basement would be better imo for dogs that love the cold.
2 - If the apartment has a lot of clutter OR has antique-like valuables lying around and you are very concerned about damage...a big breed (especially ones with very active tails and especially if they are active puppies and you are out all day long ) might not be best in that case.

As mentioned several times in this thread, apartment living in no way should imply reduced exercise.

Good luck!
__________________
Please tactfully EDUCATE or IGNORE posters you don't agree with.
Please PM me & Include URLs and post #'s for any issues and it's my pleasure to help.
I'm firm - but fair. Mind the Rules and enjoy your stay.
Newcomers FAQ - How do I post on this BB?
Pet facebook group
Check out the Pet podcast
Follow me on Twitter
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old October 19th, 2011, 12:15 PM
Longblades Longblades is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 2,013
Taking it a step further, IF an apartment dweller does not have the yard care responsibilities a homeowner does, no grass cutting, snow blowing to mention only the two biggies. THEN that owner has more time to spend with their dog so is actually in a better position due to having more time to devote to exercise.

Ok, I'm being silly. But, hey, I did take Logic 101 at University. If p then q.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old October 19th, 2011, 12:48 PM
dashn'us's Avatar
dashn'us dashn'us is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: St.Catharines, ON
Posts: 81
We live in an eight story apartment building on the 6th floor. Although our dog and most of the dogs in here are smaller breeds, there are some husky's and lab's that I see walking around. We make sure Dash goes out for some walks a few times a day and we try to go to the off-leash dog park as often as we can. I agree with all the previous posts. It's all about exercise and stimulation for the little guys
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old October 19th, 2011, 01:49 PM
breeze's Avatar
breeze breeze is offline
Half Way To Crazy
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 10,716
Quote:
Originally Posted by marko View Post
+1 - 100% agree.

The only additional points i have to make is that...
1 - the temperature of the apartment might make a difference to a samoyed. We all know hot air rises so if there isn't any AC, your Samoyed may be very warm at certain times of the year. If this is the case, then a house with a basement would be better imo for dogs that love the cold.
I have to disagree with this one, both my dogs (actually all my dogs) love the cold, and even though in the winter the house is warm for us humans or in the summer where the house is still very hot and humid my dogs never go down into the basement where it's cooler.
__________________
Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts."
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old October 19th, 2011, 03:16 PM
marko's Avatar
marko marko is offline
Administrator - Pet lover
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Montreal Quebec Canada
Posts: 11,010
You are of course free to disagree Breeze

But I try to word things carefully when I post.

In this case I basically said a Samoyed might possibly be warm in a warm apartment.

Just because your Non Samoyed doogers (gorgeous doogers btw) don't get warm does not negate the possibility that some Samoyeds may get warm.

Am I still offbase? If am please feel free to slap me upside the head
__________________
Please tactfully EDUCATE or IGNORE posters you don't agree with.
Please PM me & Include URLs and post #'s for any issues and it's my pleasure to help.
I'm firm - but fair. Mind the Rules and enjoy your stay.
Newcomers FAQ - How do I post on this BB?
Pet facebook group
Check out the Pet podcast
Follow me on Twitter
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old October 19th, 2011, 03:29 PM
breeze's Avatar
breeze breeze is offline
Half Way To Crazy
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 10,716
Marko, mine DO get very very warm, in summer and in the winter..

I had a husky and she never used the basement even in the summer when we didn't have A/C.. she just got use to the environment she would shed a lot more I found in the summer though..

but you are right "SOME" dogs may find the heat unbearable

and marko I never slap upside the head
__________________
Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts."
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old October 19th, 2011, 04:36 PM
breeze's Avatar
breeze breeze is offline
Half Way To Crazy
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 10,716
All in all,
I would look at the space, before getting a big dog for an apartment
__________________
Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts."
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old October 19th, 2011, 06:15 PM
Myka's Avatar
Myka Myka is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Saskatoon, SK.
Posts: 913
Personally, I don't think big dogs belong in apartments. The reason I would be against recommending it is that there will be days that are too hot, too cold, or too miserable to spend much time outdoors and your dog will still want to get some exercise. I had an 85lb Pit Bull/Boxer cross in a 1000 sq ft condo for a couple years. She was 22" at the shoulder (she's in my avatar too). She was a couch potato, but was always easy to "get going" even when she was 11 years old! I found the limited space of the condo made it difficult to do simple things like throw a ball. I personally think that a treadmill is definitely a strong recommendation for any dog in an apartment, but especially for a large dog (no matter their activity level). I also think that no matter how good a person's intentions are when they get their new dog that very few people will have the same time and exercise commitment to their dog after a few years as they did in the first year.

There are some breeds of dogs that are small/med that have "big dog" personalities, so maybe you could be happy with one of these smaller dogs. At the very least, consider adopting a dog that is at least 3-4 years old so that you can skip the energentic puppy stage. A puppy in confined space? Probably not the best idea.
__________________
Roxy - Feb 2005 - 75 lb American Staffordshire Bull Terrier (adopted Jul 2011)
Peewee - Jan 2006 - 8 lb Chihuahua (adopted May 2009)
--------------------
Myka - Nov 1998 to Jan 2010 - 85 lb American Pit Bull Terrier cross
Lacy - Sept 1992 to July 2003 - 18 lb Reg Shetland Sheepdog
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old October 19th, 2011, 07:00 PM
cell cell is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Montreal, QC
Posts: 586
With a big dog in a apartment you may find more issues renting (some places allow small dogs but not large). Large dogs can produce more damage much faster then a small dog. Housebreaking accidents will also be no small matter.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old October 19th, 2011, 07:00 PM
Loki Love's Avatar
Loki Love Loki Love is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Rigaud, QC
Posts: 474
While I'm not necessarily against large dogs being in an apartment, I'm a worry wart and I always think about the future too. What happens if the next apartment/dwelling won't allow such a large dog? Some places have size and weight limits on animals. Something to consider before going for the biggest dog out there

I do know a few people who have raised Danes successfully in a 1 bedroom, downtown apartment It can be done as long as you're realistic about what it all entails
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old October 20th, 2011, 05:21 AM
BenMax BenMax is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 10,191
Let's get real here.
It depends on the age of the dog, not necessarily the breed of the dog and also on the activity level of the dog you want.
Just so that it is clear, there are some small dogs that clearly cannot live in an appartment due to excessive barking...this can also go for big dogs.

Best advice is to consult with a rescue group that have their dogs foster home based. They will be able to advise you based on real live experience what dog will do well and what dog will not.

People who live in appartments MUST take their dogs for necessary walks. There is no choice as those that live in houses who just toss the dog in the backyard without any further 'adventure'.

Be wise and considerate towards your neighbours. Ensure that your dog is well behaved and that you follow through with training and outdoor activity. Again my best advice is to consult with a rescue group. They know the dogs in their care.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old October 20th, 2011, 02:17 PM
marko's Avatar
marko marko is offline
Administrator - Pet lover
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Montreal Quebec Canada
Posts: 11,010
For me the size of the apartment in and of itself is a non issue. Dog-proofing the space, landlords that may dislike pets, neighbors that may dislike pets, barking excessively - those are the issues but not necessarily the size of the apartment itself.

Both humans and dogs (in general) prefer more space to less space. We all want to live in bigger spaces.

Most people are larger than their dogs so if a small apartment is large enough for a human, it's likely large enough for any sized dog (so long as they regularly get out and get the exercise that their breed and age requires).
__________________
Please tactfully EDUCATE or IGNORE posters you don't agree with.
Please PM me & Include URLs and post #'s for any issues and it's my pleasure to help.
I'm firm - but fair. Mind the Rules and enjoy your stay.
Newcomers FAQ - How do I post on this BB?
Pet facebook group
Check out the Pet podcast
Follow me on Twitter
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old October 20th, 2011, 06:49 PM
BenMax BenMax is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 10,191
Quote:
Originally Posted by marko View Post
Both humans and dogs (in general) prefer more space to less space. We all want to live in bigger spaces.
Dogs do not care about living spaces. They care about getting affection and a good loving owner. They have no clue or concept of what 'space' means - big or small.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old October 20th, 2011, 08:14 PM
Myka's Avatar
Myka Myka is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Saskatoon, SK.
Posts: 913
Weird. I'm usually the oddball poster who is more lax about whatever situation is at hand, but this time I'm the more conservative one. Maybe it is because I need a yard, and have always found my dogs to enjoy the yard immeasurably!
__________________
Roxy - Feb 2005 - 75 lb American Staffordshire Bull Terrier (adopted Jul 2011)
Peewee - Jan 2006 - 8 lb Chihuahua (adopted May 2009)
--------------------
Myka - Nov 1998 to Jan 2010 - 85 lb American Pit Bull Terrier cross
Lacy - Sept 1992 to July 2003 - 18 lb Reg Shetland Sheepdog
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old October 21st, 2011, 11:08 AM
Stacer's Avatar
Stacer Stacer is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Ontario
Posts: 1,808
IMO, where you live with your dog is not as important as HOW you live with your dog. We have a large dog and lived in a 1 bedroom apartment on the 12th floor when we got her, we knew it wasn't necessarily ideal. We just made sure to exercise her often outdoors, spend weekends hiking and camping in the good weather and took her to offleash areas on a daily basis.

If you're responsible about how you handle a dog in such close proximity to other people, then size shouldn't really matter.

All that being said, we subsequently have moved into a house so we could give our big girly more space...
__________________
"One cat just leads to another." - Ernest Hemingway

Meowy Meowers - Angus n' Finn - 5 yrs old
Barky Barker - Skylar - 4 yrs old??
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old October 21st, 2011, 11:14 AM
Melinda's Avatar
Melinda Melinda is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 5,248
hey Stacer *hugs* now you see what I mean......an apartment, large dog, no problem for owners that see to their exercise.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old October 21st, 2011, 11:41 AM
Stacer's Avatar
Stacer Stacer is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Ontario
Posts: 1,808
Hey Melinda!
__________________
"One cat just leads to another." - Ernest Hemingway

Meowy Meowers - Angus n' Finn - 5 yrs old
Barky Barker - Skylar - 4 yrs old??
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old October 21st, 2011, 12:16 PM
BenMax BenMax is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 10,191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Myka View Post
Weird. I'm usually the oddball poster who is more lax about whatever situation is at hand, but this time I'm the more conservative one. Maybe it is because I need a yard, and have always found my dogs to enjoy the yard immeasurably!
Funny isn't it. I am usually more hard lined however this time I tend to give a little more in this subject matter. This is why:
1 - times have changed. People now live in smaller spaces. Because of this, animals (compact or not) can and will adjust. The excuse that animals cannot accompany their owners because of a space issue, really concerns me.
2 - ideally we would also want our pets to have someone home most of the day. In this day and age, this simply is not ideal. Nowadays, both people need to work to make a living. Now I know this #2 has nothing to do with the question at hand, however it is relevant to indicate that there is a trend in making adjustments to today's requirements.
3 - having dogs go from condo environment to now a home has had no bearing on them whatsoever. The extra space is just that..extra. It has provided them no more or less comfort than before. It has not enticed any of them to play more, nor go outside to a fully backyard. The backyard is actually now my convenience.

I will say this however. Living in a home with a backyard is very convenient when house breaking a dog. This is the only real advantage that I have experienced.

Please note: In the condo (900 sqft), I had a GSD, min pin X, a shih tsu and 5 cats. We absolutely were not cramped at all. I have now moved into a 2000 sqft home, with now 4 cats, 5 dogs and 3 foster cats. The space provided me the ability to foster cats. That's about all it did really.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old November 4th, 2011, 03:03 PM
067734m 067734m is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 46
We have a 50lb beagle/hound mix (read: "beagle on stilts") in our two bedroom/two bath apartment and it works out great. We are all very comfortable. I think our dog may even be getting a better deal than someone with a yard as we go on "off-territory" walks everytime we go out (as opposed to just letting your dog out in the same backyard). We do exercise a lot and usually go out on long weekend hikes. So I'd say apartments do require a little more attention to your dog (great for your dog). I am thinking of getting her a jacket or something for the winter as the temp changes could be a little extreme - it's our first winter...
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old November 5th, 2011, 08:42 AM
BenMax BenMax is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 10,191
Quote:
Originally Posted by 067734m View Post
We have a 50lb beagle/hound mix (read: "beagle on stilts") in our two bedroom/two bath apartment and it works out great. We are all very comfortable. I think our dog may even be getting a better deal than someone with a yard as we go on "off-territory" walks everytime we go out (as opposed to just letting your dog out in the same backyard). We do exercise a lot and usually go out on long weekend hikes. So I'd say apartments do require a little more attention to your dog (great for your dog). I am thinking of getting her a jacket or something for the winter as the temp changes could be a little extreme - it's our first winter...
Thank you for posting your experience. I could not agree with you more.
Every dog is an individual. There are big breed couch potatoes that do not have to have big spaces to be comfortable.
I think of dogs in cages at the shelters. I ask myself would they prefer being in a cage and possible freezer, or would they prefer a loving environment. Hands down, I think I know what the answer would be.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old November 5th, 2011, 11:01 AM
Myka's Avatar
Myka Myka is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Saskatoon, SK.
Posts: 913
Quote:
Originally Posted by BenMax View Post
1 - times have changed. People now live in smaller spaces. Because of this, animals (compact or not) can and will adjust. The excuse that animals cannot accompany their owners because of a space issue, really concerns me.
2 - ideally we would also want our pets to have someone home most of the day. In this day and age, this simply is not ideal. Nowadays, both people need to work to make a living.
Hmmm, I don't think I could agree less.

#1 - For thousands of years the trend has always been that people on larger land plots tended to have larger dogs. Indoor dogs tended to be smaller. Large palaces with land often had fairly large dogs like Bourjois, Saluki, etc. The dogs tended to suit their purpose. This should still be the same - people should choose a breed that suits their life, instead of trying to cram a square into a circle hole. What time has changed is that now people have dogs based upon their wants/likes rather than needs, which ties into #2.

#2 - One of my absolute biggest pet peeves is when people say both spouses have to work to make a living. This is absolutely false, but getting into this subject is REALLY off-topic and needs its own thread if we should carry on discussing.
__________________
Roxy - Feb 2005 - 75 lb American Staffordshire Bull Terrier (adopted Jul 2011)
Peewee - Jan 2006 - 8 lb Chihuahua (adopted May 2009)
--------------------
Myka - Nov 1998 to Jan 2010 - 85 lb American Pit Bull Terrier cross
Lacy - Sept 1992 to July 2003 - 18 lb Reg Shetland Sheepdog
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old November 5th, 2011, 04:38 PM
Etown_Chick Etown_Chick is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Edmonton
Posts: 597
Just my two cents. I have a very active, medium-size dog. When I got him I was living in a house with a huge yard, blocks from the dog park. We went every day and he ran his ass off..
Now I live in a motel (temporarily), lots of walks, off leash a few times a week. I'm more cramped than Scruffy is. He's adapted beautifully. He has a comfy place to sleep, he can still drive me nuts with fetch, gets lots of walks, meets lots of humans, all the things he needs to make him happy. Dogs adapt.
I wouldn't have a mal in an apt, though, they'll shed you to death. But a short coat dog without the insulating layer of fur that a mal has would likely do just fine. But I would agree, it makes future rentals difficult, if not impossible. The reason I am in a motel is that I can't find a place to rent that takes a 45 lb dog, never mind a dane or some such.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old November 5th, 2011, 05:17 PM
BenMax BenMax is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 10,191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Myka View Post
Hmmm, I don't think I could agree less.

#1 - For thousands of years the trend has always been that people on larger land plots tended to have larger dogs. Indoor dogs tended to be smaller. Large palaces with land often had fairly large dogs like Bourjois, Saluki, etc. The dogs tended to suit their purpose. This should still be the same - people should choose a breed that suits their life, instead of trying to cram a square into a circle hole. What time has changed is that now people have dogs based upon their wants/likes rather than needs, which ties into #2.

#2 - One of my absolute biggest pet peeves is when people say both spouses have to work to make a living. This is absolutely false, but getting into this subject is REALLY off-topic and needs its own thread if we should carry on discussing.
You do not have to agree at all. You have your opinion, I have mine. As I deal with dogs on death row I guess I am more inclined to find them in a home with love than in the freezer.

If the OP is going the rescue route, then the rescue would only place a large dog that would do well in a small space setting. They know their dogs and what is acceptable and what is not. Large dog does not necessarily require large space. It depends on the temperment, requirement and behaviours of that particular dog.

As for two income families and inflation..well that is up for discussion in another thread. Good point.

Last edited by BenMax; November 5th, 2011 at 05:35 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old November 5th, 2011, 06:08 PM
BenMax BenMax is offline
Senior Contributor
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 10,191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Etown_Chick View Post
Just my two cents. I have a very active, medium-size dog. When I got him I was living in a house with a huge yard, blocks from the dog park. We went every day and he ran his ass off..
Now I live in a motel (temporarily), lots of walks, off leash a few times a week. I'm more cramped than Scruffy is. He's adapted beautifully. He has a comfy place to sleep, he can still drive me nuts with fetch, gets lots of walks, meets lots of humans, all the things he needs to make him happy. Dogs adapt.
I wouldn't have a mal in an apt, though, they'll shed you to death. But a short coat dog without the insulating layer of fur that a mal has would likely do just fine. But I would agree, it makes future rentals difficult, if not impossible. The reason I am in a motel is that I can't find a place to rent that takes a 45 lb dog, never mind a dane or some such.
I am more inclined to go by someone who is experiencing this as you currently are, rather than what people think.
And you are right, dogs do adapt.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Forum Terms of Use

  • All Bulletin Board Posts are for personal/non-commercial use only.
  • Self-promotion and/or promotion in general is prohibited.
  • Debate is healthy but profane and deliberately rude posts will be deleted.
  • Posters not following the rules will be banned at the Admins' discretion.
  • Read the Full Forum Rules

Forum Details

  • Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
    vBulletin Optimisation by vB Optimise (Reduced on this page: MySQL 8.33%).
  • All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:42 AM.