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Old August 16th, 2012, 02:10 PM
goobygirl goobygirl is offline
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cat teeth

Hi all,

new member today! I'm trying to find out more information about abcessed cat teeth. I have a Maine coon mix and she recently developed some abcessed rear teeth. When she does eat, if the food gets on that side she hollers and runs to hide. She will drink wet food juice and water. I tried some food in the blender on liquify but she won't eat it. Our vet says she has a weak heart and advises against pulling the teeth. Are there any other options besides putting her down (she's around 12-13 yr old). Should I risk her getting her teeth pulled? Any advice appreciated.
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Old August 16th, 2012, 03:13 PM
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sugarcatmom sugarcatmom is offline
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Hi goobygirl, welcome to pets.ca!

Quote:
Originally Posted by goobygirl View Post
When she does eat, if the food gets on that side she hollers and runs to hide.
Sounds horribly painful, poor girl.

Quote:
Originally Posted by goobygirl View Post
Our vet says she has a weak heart and advises against pulling the teeth.
What does your vet mean by "weak heart"? Were any diagnostics done, like an echocardiogram, to determine exactly what the heart condition is?

Quote:
Originally Posted by goobygirl View Post
Should I risk her getting her teeth pulled?
Before going that route, you could try a course of antibiotics and pain meds (but NOT Metacam!) to help her feel more comfortable and get her eating sufficiently. But that might only provide short-term relief and if the teeth are truly in bad shape, it could still be necessary to get them out. The bacteria from infected teeth can travel through the bloodstream and cause other health problems, namely to the heart and kidneys.

I totally understand how scary it can be to put a cat with heart issues under anesthetic, but I think the risk in your kitty's case might be worth it. Painful teeth are debilitating and it becomes a quality of life issue, so if euthanasia is the other option, I would be inclined to TRY the dental, taking as many precautions as possible. That means I would ask your vet for a referral to a dental specialist or at least someone with more confidence/experience in handling such a situation.

My own cat, who is 19, had a dental done a few months ago and did great. He has hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, diagnosed via echocardiogram and has been taking Atenolol for it for many years. He's also diabetic and has renal insufficiency, so the risks were high. But even though I was scared silly at having it done, I don't regret it for one second.

Good luck!
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Old August 18th, 2012, 02:38 PM
goobygirl goobygirl is offline
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Sugarcatmom,

The doc listened to her heart with a stethascope. Gooby is actually small so that is why I think she is Maine coon mix. I bought her some CatSip milk which she gives a few laps before running off. My husband has also put some wet food (Friskies) and mixed it with some CatSip and chickenbroth, puts in a blender and liquifies it and puts it out for her and she does the same thing. Other than that she is perfectly healthy. Personally I don't believe her heart is weak - just small, as she runs all over and actually jumps from the floor onto the countertops (around 3.5 - 4 ft). I'm thinking my vet is not very experienced with this problem.
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Old August 18th, 2012, 02:52 PM
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sugarcatmom sugarcatmom is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goobygirl View Post
I'm thinking my vet is not very experienced with this problem.
I'm thinking you're right. There is no way he can determine what the nature of the heart condition is, or how serious it is, just from listening to it. Not even a certified veterinary cardiologist can do that! Did he even suggest other options besides euthanasia? I personally would be finding another vet, preferably a feline-only one. Your kitty needs some relief from her dental pain NOW, or she's just going to get weaker and weaker and will be an even worse candidate for anesthesia.
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Old August 19th, 2012, 09:47 AM
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marko marko is offline
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First off welcome to the forum - glad u found us!

1 100% agree with sugarcatmom here....I'm also not convinced this vet has the most experience with this matter. How many years of experience does this vet have? I too would very likely get a second opinion at another vet..and that second opinion would come from a recommendation only.

If this were my cat, those abscessed teeth would be extracted.

I would never euthanize a cat for this, I would do the extractions and pray that the cat makes it...

- If the cat makes it you've saved her life and given her quality of life.
- If the cat does not make it, then you've tried your best to help her.

Good luck and please update us.
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Old August 19th, 2012, 08:26 PM
goobygirl goobygirl is offline
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Marko/Sugarcatmom,

Gooby seems to be eating quite a bit today I am going to take her to a cat-only vet (decided this yesterday). She is still going to the kitty box, so that is a good sign. As I write this, she is drinking water! I've looked at some vet sites about pulling teeth and they say they have to take blood tests and see how strong the bones are. Is this necessary and why don't humans get this when they have teeth pulled? Just asking.
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