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  #1  
Old March 15th, 2012, 12:26 PM
lovepet lovepet is offline
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Help Me Out

Sounds crazy but people ask about how to make their dogs bark and here I am.... I am asking how to make my dog quiet....

Every morning with the rising of sun my dog becomes a cock.... or I think some cock's soul occupies him because he starts barking and keep on barking for no reason... He nonstop jumps and its violent jump at full speed that seems to land dead center on the crotch.

Any help would be appreciated or if you have any questions for please post. Stress level is at max.
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  #2  
Old March 15th, 2012, 01:13 PM
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Rgeurts Rgeurts is offline
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Hello lovepet, and welcome to the board

I have no advice for you, becuase I am dealing with the same thing and have not figured out how to get him to stop lol

I have a 91 lb Malamute that just turned 2 at the end of Feb. He has done this since he was very young. As soon as he sees the sunlight (or any hint of it!), he is up scratching at the bed. If we ignore him he will start whining very softly, then winds up to howling. If we continue to ignore it he will jump on the bed. If we still continue to ignore him, he will stand over the top of me, drop with his full weight and whine some more while pawing at my HEAD

We spoke with our vet who laughed. He said if I had told him that Nookie didn't want to get up in the morning, he would worry. He said that he is a young dog with energy and when he wakes up, he thinks we should wake up to, and that's ok! I disagree... it's not ok lol... I want to sleep in on the weekends

What my hubby and I do now is take turns. Saturday, I get up with the monster and Sunday, daddy gets up with him. If you do find a way to curb it, please let me know!! And good luck
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  #3  
Old March 15th, 2012, 01:33 PM
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marko marko is offline
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Hi Lovepet and welcome.
You left out age, breed, sex of dog and if dog is spayed/neutered and these may be important.

I wonder if the dog is doing this to eat, to play, to do its business.

Any additional info might spark some ideas.
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  #4  
Old March 19th, 2012, 11:39 AM
Sabian Sabian is offline
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A dog will do whatever he can to get what he wants. If you have EVER got up when he starts with this behaviour, even to yell at him, he has succeded. If you have ignored him for a while and then got up out of sheer frustration, you have taught him to try HARDER and LONGER.

I teach dog training and none of my students are allowed to let their dog bark or whine in class or the parking lot. If they do, they must correct the dog with a 1 second POP upwards on the leash. No longer than ONE SECOND or you are "yanking", which is abuse. It has to be almost like the motion of a whip crack (POP - immediate release). It has to be firm enough to startle the dog in the midst of his misbehaviour so he can connect the pop with the crime. You would say "QUIET" in a loud firm calm voice (no emotion) and if the dog does not stop, pop him up again harder the next time he barks. Make sure the collar is up high behind the ears where he can feel it - too low and you're on the muscular part where they can't feel anything. Make sure the collar is snug enough too - it should fit like a watchband - snug but not tight.

If he sleeps in your bedroom, the minute he starts to whine, attach the collar & leash and wait calmly for him to misbehave. Don't touch him, talk or look at him - be an unemotional rock. When he starts to bark, use the technique described. He may yelp the first time - that's OK - you surprised him which is the whole point. If he continues to bark, say nothing, pop harder. He WILL get the point as long as you are FAST, FIRM and ON-TIME with your corrections.

I know everyone has different methods of teaching and I respect that. This is a method that will ALWAYS work if you do it correctly and consistently. Keep emotion out of the mix even though you feel frustrated - frustration may make you inadvertently pop harder. Your dog will quickly learn to be quiet when you command.

Good Luck!
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Old March 20th, 2012, 09:09 AM
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Myka Myka is offline
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I would be inclined to crate the dog at night until the issue is solved. I would also be inclined to use an electric shock collar (with strength dial and remote, so you control how strong it is and when it shocks) because the moment you pop up out of bed to correct the dog he still thinks he's winning because you got up. The correct time to give him a correction with the collar is when he is just starting to get worked up - before he starts barking. Don't forget to use a command like "quiet" or "settle" or "enough" before using the collar, but be careful to not become repetitive with the command.

Of course I will get flamed for the suggestion of an electric collar because "oh my that is so awful". We have a small electric collar for Peewee (he's a Chihuahua) that is adjusted accordingly, just high enough to get a reaction from him (I can barely feel it). He used to be very jumpy and would get really worked up and yappy which would cause him to stress himself right out. The electric collar has made a world of difference (snapped him out of it), and has made him much calmer. He doesn't have to wear it anymore as he understands "enough" means I have it under control, and he will just lay down and relax now when I say the word. When used as a training tool rather than a punishment device it can really help to snap a dog out of their obsession.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabian View Post
A dog will do whatever he can to get what he wants. If you have EVER got up when he starts with this behaviour, even to yell at him, he has succeded. If you have ignored him for a while and then got up out of sheer frustration, you have taught him to try HARDER and LONGER.
Agreed.
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Old March 20th, 2012, 11:05 AM
Sabian Sabian is offline
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Crating is a good idea BUT he will still make noise & bark. If you can ignore him for the entire time without saying a word or getting up it should work. He may be a tenacious little bugger and keep it up for hours. Depends on your patience.

I have absolutely no issue using an e-collar, as long as the user has been trained properly. I have used it on several dogs with success. However, in this case, the dog would have to sleep with the collar ON all night for the owner to be able to correct him at the crack of dawn. The batteries might wear out overnight and dogs should not be wearing training collars to sleep in.

Try the crate - it will only work if you are prepared to put up alot of fuss on the part of the dog. It may also make the dog anxious if he is already so inclined.

What I like about the collar correction is that is immediate and sends a very clear message - "CUT IT OUT NOW!" Yes, you have to get up and clip on the leash, but it can't be helped. As long as the dog gets nothing when you get up (no talk, no touch, nothing) it will work.

Good luck with whichever method you choose.
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Old March 21st, 2012, 08:51 AM
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Myka Myka is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabian View Post
However, in this case, the dog would have to sleep with the collar ON all night for the owner to be able to correct him at the crack of dawn. The batteries might wear out overnight and dogs should not be wearing training collars to sleep in.
I agree that generally dogs should not be sleeping with an electric collar on, but each situation is different, and in this case if the OP decides to try an electric collar she definitely would have to put it on the dog overnight. If she were to put the collar on the dog when he started fussing he would learn that the collar is correcting him, and that makes it a moot point. To this day Peewee has no idea that it is the collar making the correction, and he is one smart cookie (annoyingly so).

I bought Duracell batteries on eBay from Hong Kong. In the grocery store here they were $5 each. The collar took 2 batteries and they lasted about a week with the collar on for about 15 hours a day. On eBay they were $1 each plus a bit for shipping. I bought 25 batteries for $30 shipped, and didn't use them all up. I would suggest anyone check battery life and battery cost on a collar before buying.
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Roxy - Feb 2005 - 75 lb American Staffordshire Bull Terrier (adopted Jul 2011)
Peewee - Jan 2006 - 8 lb Chihuahua (adopted May 2009)
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