Go Back   Pet forum for dogs cats and humans - Pets.ca > Other pet critters - Birds, fish, rabbits, reptiles, rodents and exotics > Birds

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old May 27th, 2011, 01:21 PM
hazelrunpack's Avatar
hazelrunpack hazelrunpack is offline
The Pack's Head Servant
Chopper Challenge Champion, Mini KickUps Champion, Bugz Champion, Snakeman Steve Champion, Shape Game Champion, Mumu Champion, Mouse Race Champion
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Just east of the Hazelnut Patch, Wisconsin
Posts: 50,049
The Main Event--banding birds at Hazel Run, 24 May 2011

As mentioned in another thread, I was the high bidder in a silent auction fund-raiser for a local nature center (Beaver Creek Reserve, just outside of Fall Creek). After the trial run in March, the banders returned in late May for the Main Event.

The crew arrived at 7 and by 7:20, we were already netting birds. Here Augie is removing one of the first birds of the morning.

Name:  Augie working the nets 5-24-11.jpg
Views: 320
Size:  118.7 KB

The mist nets are so lightweight that they're nearly invisible. If you look closely at the image below, you can see some of the netting close to the pole, but the camera was not able to clearly resolve the netting that spreads over the whole right-hand side of this pic:

Name:  The nearly invisible mist net 5-24-11.jpg
Views: 322
Size:  70.2 KB

Name:  Ruby-throated hummingbird 5-24-11.jpg
Views: 313
Size:  91.6 KB

Although most of the hummingbirds are able to detect and evade, we did have 9 that ended up in the nets. Since the crew is not licensed to band them, they were released. It was interesting watching them approach the nets, hover, back up and fly over the barrier. Occasionally, we'd see one sitting on the top edge of a net!
__________________
"We are--each of us--dying; it's how we live in the meantime that makes the difference."

"It's not what you gather, but what you scatter that tells what kind of life you have lived!"

"Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle."
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old May 27th, 2011, 01:33 PM
hazelrunpack's Avatar
hazelrunpack hazelrunpack is offline
The Pack's Head Servant
Chopper Challenge Champion, Mini KickUps Champion, Bugz Champion, Snakeman Steve Champion, Shape Game Champion, Mumu Champion, Mouse Race Champion
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Just east of the Hazelnut Patch, Wisconsin
Posts: 50,049
They banded quite a variety of birds. Some were year-round residents, like this white-breasted nuthatch:

Name:  The one and only white-breasted nuthatch for the day 5-24-11.jpg
Views: 297
Size:  97.7 KB

Others were migrants, like this handsome Baltimore oriole male:

Name:  Baltimore oriole 5-24-11 A.jpg
Views: 335
Size:  46.1 KB

And some were less welcome migrants, like this very lucky brown-headed cowbird female. Brown-headed cowbirds are nest parasites--they lay their eggs in smaller birds' nests to have the host parents raise their young. Often, the cowbird young will push the other hatchlings or eggs out of the nest. This can really impact the number of small songbirds hatched from an area. For example--last year we had lots of chipping sparrows and a normal amount (for us) of cowbirds. A fair number of chipping sparrows were parasitized last summer and this year we have lots of cowbirds and very few chipping sparrows.

Name:  A very lucky cowbird 5-24-11.jpg
Views: 292
Size:  55.8 KB

Normally, cowbirds stuck to the plains, but human activities such as road building and farming, have opened up new territory for them. If they have a corridor (a power-line right of way in our case) they can extend far into the forest and parasitize new species that had never been reachable for them before.

Why did I call this one lucky? This is the one species of native bird that the WI DNR allows people to dispatch because they have such a negative impact on other native birds. One female cowbird can parasitize maybe 70 nests in her lifetime. There was some discussion about whether to dispatch this one or release her. hazel was outvoted and the bird was released. Very lucky, indeed.
__________________
"We are--each of us--dying; it's how we live in the meantime that makes the difference."

"It's not what you gather, but what you scatter that tells what kind of life you have lived!"

"Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle."
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old May 27th, 2011, 01:49 PM
hazelrunpack's Avatar
hazelrunpack hazelrunpack is offline
The Pack's Head Servant
Chopper Challenge Champion, Mini KickUps Champion, Bugz Champion, Snakeman Steve Champion, Shape Game Champion, Mumu Champion, Mouse Race Champion
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Just east of the Hazelnut Patch, Wisconsin
Posts: 50,049
Once a bird is captured, the species is determined and certain data on each individual is recorded.

Name:  Recording data 5-24-11.jpg
Views: 294
Size:  65.9 KB

Data collected includes species, date captured, age, measurement of the wing chord, and gender if it can be determined. Age determination can be difficult, as can gender. Age categories include hatch year (HY), after hatch year (AHY), second year (SY) and after second year (ASY). AHY is used for birds that don't have marked plumage changes after they molt into their adult feathers. SY is used in species like American goldfinches, where the feathers at the bend of the wing are paler in the second year than in subsequent years. ASY is used for birds like purple finch males, that don't get their purple coloring until after their second year.

Gender can also be difficult to tell depending on the species so there are three categories: M, F, and U (for undetermined). In spring it's sometimes possible to determine the gender of birds such as chickadees by looking for a brood patch. The female's brood patch is a very extensive bald spot on the breast that can be detected by blowing lightly on the feathers. The male's is less extensive and not as bald. So we were able to determine gender at this banding by brood patch, where the chickadees banded at the end of March were all listed as U.

Band is chosen according to size for each species, and the number is recorded before it's attached to the bird. Sometimes it's hard to make out the numbers:

Name:  Dan choosing the correct band 5-24-11.jpg
Views: 305
Size:  66.6 KB

We have a leucistic purple finch in the area. He's quite distinctive. Leucism is a condition in some birds often referred to erroneously as 'partial albinism'. The birds aren't true albinos, but do have a defective pigment metabolism. 'Mr. Pink' was caught and banded on Tuesday, and our identification as a purple finch was confirmed after some discussion and examination by the banding crew.

Name:  Mr Pink got a bracelet today 5-24-11.jpg
Views: 334
Size:  54.8 KB
__________________
"We are--each of us--dying; it's how we live in the meantime that makes the difference."

"It's not what you gather, but what you scatter that tells what kind of life you have lived!"

"Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle."
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old May 27th, 2011, 01:54 PM
hazelrunpack's Avatar
hazelrunpack hazelrunpack is offline
The Pack's Head Servant
Chopper Challenge Champion, Mini KickUps Champion, Bugz Champion, Snakeman Steve Champion, Shape Game Champion, Mumu Champion, Mouse Race Champion
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Just east of the Hazelnut Patch, Wisconsin
Posts: 50,049
One of the fundraisers at the Reserve is an 'Adopt a Bird' program. When a bird is banded, a picture is taken and people can 'adopt' that bird with a donation. Here Larry is taking a picture of an indigo bunting for the 'Adopt a Bird' adoption board.

Name:  Larry taking an 'adopt a bird' pic 5-24-11 B.jpg
Views: 301
Size:  64.4 KB

A newly-banded chipping sparrow shortly before release:

Name:  Chipping sparrow, ready to go 5-24-11.jpg
Views: 302
Size:  56.1 KB

And at release...

Name:  Chipping sparrow abstract 5-24-11.jpg
Views: 301
Size:  38.9 KB
__________________
"We are--each of us--dying; it's how we live in the meantime that makes the difference."

"It's not what you gather, but what you scatter that tells what kind of life you have lived!"

"Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle."
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old May 27th, 2011, 02:00 PM
hazelrunpack's Avatar
hazelrunpack hazelrunpack is offline
The Pack's Head Servant
Chopper Challenge Champion, Mini KickUps Champion, Bugz Champion, Snakeman Steve Champion, Shape Game Champion, Mumu Champion, Mouse Race Champion
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Just east of the Hazelnut Patch, Wisconsin
Posts: 50,049
We captured a lot of rose-breasted grosbeaks. The banding crew's record one-day total prior to this was 15 banded. They banded 64 here and didn't recapture any I saw five at the feeders this morning that had no band at all...so we missed a few.

Have a mentioned that we have a lot of rose-breasted grosbeaks here?

Karen retrieves a grosbeak from the net:

Name:  Karen untangling a rose-breasted grosbeak fem 5-24-11.jpg
Views: 294
Size:  68.3 KB

See the peachy color under the wing? This one is a female. The males have a rosy-pink patch there instead.

Name:  A beautiful female grosbeak 5-24-11.jpg
Views: 283
Size:  47.2 KB

Karen about to release a male rose-breasted grosbeak after banding.

Name:  Mesmerized 5-24-11.jpg
Views: 284
Size:  55.0 KB
__________________
"We are--each of us--dying; it's how we live in the meantime that makes the difference."

"It's not what you gather, but what you scatter that tells what kind of life you have lived!"

"Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle."
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old May 27th, 2011, 02:02 PM
hazelrunpack's Avatar
hazelrunpack hazelrunpack is offline
The Pack's Head Servant
Chopper Challenge Champion, Mini KickUps Champion, Bugz Champion, Snakeman Steve Champion, Shape Game Champion, Mumu Champion, Mouse Race Champion
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Just east of the Hazelnut Patch, Wisconsin
Posts: 50,049
Banding yet another grosbeak:

Name:  Banding one of the 64 rose-breasted grosbeaks caught today 5-24-11.jpg
Views: 278
Size:  84.5 KB

A little disheveled after banding, but none the worse for wear:

Name:  A handsome male grosbeak 5-24-11.jpg
Views: 279
Size:  64.4 KB

And a shot of the rosy underwing of a male:

Name:  Rose-breasted grosbeak 5-24-11 A.jpg
Views: 281
Size:  56.7 KB
__________________
"We are--each of us--dying; it's how we live in the meantime that makes the difference."

"It's not what you gather, but what you scatter that tells what kind of life you have lived!"

"Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle."
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Forum Terms of Use

  • All Bulletin Board Posts are for personal/non-commercial use only.
  • Self-promotion and/or promotion in general is prohibited.
  • Debate is healthy but profane and deliberately rude posts will be deleted.
  • Posters not following the rules will be banned at the Admins' discretion.
  • Read the Full Forum Rules

Forum Details

  • Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
    vBulletin Optimisation by vB Optimise (Reduced on this page: MySQL 0%).
  • All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:40 AM.