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Old July 5th, 2004, 11:42 AM
JKC27 JKC27 is offline
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Question Cat declawing

Sorry if this is posted elsewhere, but I am new to this board.

Looking for input/advice on wether to declaw my kitten or not once he is old enough. He is getting *fixed*, and have tenatively booked to have him front declawed. I am starting to doubt wether or not to get the declawing done. My vet says it is up to me, but that is extremely painful for the cat.

He doesn't scratch, and is really friendly. He will scratch a little while playing, but uses his teeth more. I have a 5 yr old at home, but she is really good with the cat too (4 month old).

The biggest problem I have with his claws is him scaling my new screens on my windows (see other post regarding this).

I have this booked for mid August, so any input/advice would be super.

Thanks!
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Old July 5th, 2004, 12:02 PM
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Good question to ask before doing it!

DON'T!! It's cruel and very painful to the cats. Others with cat knowledge more extensive then my little bit of info can give you the graphic details of what they have to endure and go through.

It's not necessary, so pls dont' do it!
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Old July 5th, 2004, 12:06 PM
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I agree. If he doesn't bother much except the screens, then I'd say it isn't worth it.
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Old August 4th, 2004, 11:12 AM
Michel Michel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luba
Good question to ask before doing it!

DON'T!! It's cruel and very painful to the cats. Others with cat knowledge more extensive then my little bit of info can give you the graphic details of what they have to endure and go through.

It's not necessary, so pls dont' do it!

Painful? oh please! As if spaying isn't a little tender? Every cat I've ever owned went in for the spay/declaw at the same time.. Spaying slowed the girls down for about a day, more than long enough for the paws to cool down. Every one of them was back to running and jumping around the house in 24 hours. Imagine how they preferred not being scolded or squirted with the water gun for climbing the furnature. Perhaps my girls recovered so quick because they were confined to one room with the little box (impeccibly clean) only a few steps away.

If you want to declaw, do it. Just remember it means forever indoors or on a harness. Only front claws are done so cats can still climb trees etc and fight quite well with rear claws.

I'd associate claw removal as not unlike a human having a non-impacted wisdom tooth extracted. Ya it feels a little odd and a little tender for a day or two but you get over it.
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Old August 4th, 2004, 11:34 AM
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Shae Shae is offline
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I wasn't even going to respond to your very uneducated remarks. However, I feel it is in the utmost best interest in vats for their owners to understand and NOT to listen to people as yourself. I have been a veterinary surgical assistant for approx 16 years. I finally refused to partake in declwing. What does that tell you? Read my above posts please. If someone came along and wanted to amputate your toes, would that be humane and fine with you? It might be difficult to balance for awhile but the pain should subside in oh, a few days to a couple months....so you wouldn't mind would you?
You say your cat was running around and on and off furniture in 24 hours?! Really now? 1st, I think that's load of BS, but then again, I stated that, yes, indeed some recover faster than others.......BUT, what does this say about you as a pet owner? You are required to limit your pets activity for 5-10 days AT LEAST! For their own safety!! Ie: suture lines may open or swell, then in which casew would become abscessed from licking and / or jumping/activity., etc al. Which very well could require a whole new surgical process to put your feline companion through. Declawing is not for their own good........it's something YOU simply choose to put them through for your own selfish reasons. Spaying and neutering howver, is for THEM and their wellbeing. As for you spaying and declawing at the same time, I'm a betting woman, you did that b/c you save on the anaesthetic cost when you spay and declaw in the one visit rather than 2 ! !
Use you head. Sorry if I appear rude, but people as yourself drive me nuts. Educate yourself. READ the above with the diagram. Ask to witness the actual surgery. Ask yourself why it is being deemed illegal to perform this surgical procedure in many countries (stated abover in earlier posts also)
  #6  
Old August 4th, 2004, 11:44 AM
Michel Michel is offline
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Thumbs down

Oh please, just step down off your soap box.

Ya, was there, saw surgury done on one cat 19 yrs ago. No big whoop. Conjunctive nail joint really is not comparative to human toe function. Every one of my cats (male and female) over the last 25 years have had this done. Every single time each vet said to keep them quiet for a solid 24 hours (multiple professionals).. and amazing (by some perspectives), all were back to normal in a day or so. Every animal was done before 6 months.

Oh and to whomever quipped about having their dog nails removed. Yes, had the dew claws from my GSD's done too.

Gee I must be just an evil crewl toe rag for declawing, keeping strictly inside, never vaccinating them all.. Funny how all the cats have lived to 18+ years (except my current lad who is a young 15).

Here is my pooooor so hard done by boy.. ha ha

the bottom line is, owners have a choice. You do not have the right to dissuade, bully or otherside attempt to slant someone else's choice.
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Last edited by Michel; August 4th, 2004 at 11:51 AM. Reason: ad photo
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Old August 4th, 2004, 11:49 AM
sammiec sammiec is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michel
Oh please, just step down off your soap box.

Ya, was there, saw surgury done on one cat 19 yrs ago. No big whoop. Conjunctive nail joint really is not comparative to human toe function. Every one of my cats (male and female) over the last 25 years have had this done. Every single time each vet said to keep them quiet for a solid 24 hours (multiple professionals).. and amazing (by some perspectives), all were back to normal in a day or so. Every animal was done before 6 months.

Oh and to whomever quipped about having their dog nails removed. Yes, had the dew claws from my GSD's done too.

Gee I must be just an evil crewl toe rag for declawing, keeping strictly inside, never vaccinating them all.. Funny how all the cats have lived to 18+ years (except my current lad who is a young 15).
Oh, sorry troll. I'll get down off my soap box, I can see my reign is over - do you need a help up? I can get you a stool?
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Old August 4th, 2004, 11:42 AM
sammiec sammiec is offline
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I don't think you're read this entire thread before your hasty response...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michel
Painful? oh please! As if spaying isn't a little tender?
yes, that's not argued. Spaying is painful BUT unlike declawing it prevents cancer and other alments in your pets. There is NO health benefit of declawing, just selfish humans concerned about themselves.

Quote:
If you want to declaw, do it. Just remember it means forever indoors or on a harness. Only front claws are done so cats can still climb trees etc and fight quite well with rear claws.
I don't know about you, but I think a cat could climb a tree MUCH easier with BOTH sets of claws.. can't grip too well with no claws on the front...

Quote:
I'd associate claw removal as not unlike a human having a non-impacted wisdom tooth extracted. Ya it feels a little odd and a little tender for a day or two but you get over it.
Non impacted wisdom teeth extraction is done WITH CONSENT for the human, maybe your cats are different, but mine has never asked me once to escentially, rip out his fingernails....and it feels a little odd and tender, but you don't have to walk on them do you??.. what about infections... that takes a LITTLE longer to heal - and there are plenty of health implications to both teeth removal and declawing..
  #9  
Old August 19th, 2004, 08:07 PM
boris boris is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luba
Good question to ask before doing it!

DON'T!! It's cruel and very painful to the cats. Others with cat knowledge more extensive then my little bit of info can give you the graphic details of what they have to endure and go through.

It's not necessary, so pls dont' do it!

Oh, please...Sure, it's not comfortable after any surgery. But if it's getting done at the same time as a neuter or spay, then the "hurt" is just relative. The anatomy lesson of what goes on during a declaw is just inflammatory rhetoric. Jeez, getting one's below the belt "equipment" chopped off is not exactly a party for the animal, either. In fact, I think if a cat could talk, he'd tell you to remove his claws before you even consider touching his goodies.

All three of my prior cats were front declawed at the same time they were spayed/neutered, and they all lived happy lives of over 20 years each. The major concern is if the cat ever gets outside and loose for a few hours or even days, which inevitably happens to everybody's cat. The declawed cat is then at a major disadvantage if it gets itself into a battle with another cat. I now have two Russian Blues, and that is the sole reason I'm not having them declawed. Yes, I'd like to have them declawed, but I know from prior experience they will eventually sneak outside. It's only a matter of time. I want them to be able to battle with another cat if they have to. But then again, I don't have young children who could get badly clawed by an angry pet. If I did, my decision just might be different.
  #10  
Old August 19th, 2004, 11:23 PM
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chico2 chico2 is offline
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Boris,com on the hurt is "relative",to whom? You?
I would never dream of causing any of my cats,that kind of pain to save my furniture.....anyone even contemplating mutilating their cat to suit their own needs,should look into getting an aquarium instead.
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  #11  
Old August 20th, 2004, 10:36 AM
boris boris is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chico2
Boris,com on the hurt is "relative",to whom? You?
I would never dream of causing any of my cats,that kind of pain to save my furniture.....anyone even contemplating mutilating their cat to suit their own needs,should look into getting an aquarium instead.

The whole concept of "pet" is strictly to suit the needs of people. Your entire argument is even more floppy than the fish in your aquarium...By the way, how did you reach your conclusion that your fish are thrilled about having to spend their entire lives inside a glass container not large enough to hold a carton of eggs?
  #12  
Old July 5th, 2004, 12:08 PM
Lucky Rescue Lucky Rescue is offline
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First of all, welcome to the board!!

Many people think that declawing cats is merely like cutting our nails. It is not. Other people will also tell you that cats come through this surgery just fine. Some do, but others have infection, complications and great pain. Sometimes a deformed nail regrows, and must be surgically removed again. Some cats will take to biting, some will stop using the litterbox. Most probably don't, but this is a chance you take.

This is a mutilation that is done ONLY for human convenience, has NO benefit to the cat, and as such, I simply cannot condone it, and our rescue expressly forbids it for our adopted cats.

As for climbing the screen, this is something kittens do and he should outgrow it as it would be very uncomfortable for an adult cat to be hanging by his nails from a screen.

Learn to clip his nails. I clip my cats' nails regularly and keep them short.

Get a scratch post and some catnip. Make sure the scratchpost is VERY solid and doesn't move when your cat uses it. Rub some catnip on the post and dangle a toy in front of it to encourage him to stand and scratch.

Never play with your kitten with your hands, and don't allow your child to either. Always use a toy to play with cats, so they never think it's o.k. to grab and scratch hands.

Here is an article on declawing.

Declawing
  #13  
Old July 5th, 2004, 01:22 PM
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Now is a perfect time to start clipping his nails. He'll grow up used to it and it will be easy. When my cat scratches something, she does it right in front of me and I know it's her way of telling me she needs me to do it. She sits very calmly in my lap and watches while I do it.
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Old July 5th, 2004, 01:29 PM
JKC27 JKC27 is offline
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Smile

Thank you to everyone for your input and advice. I read the article LuckyRescue linked me to and I was very shocked. I have trimmed his claws twice, and while it isn't Tucker's favourite activity, he doesn't mind. Plus his vet trims him too. I usually have to catch him when he is dozey.

I priced out and looked at some cat houses (I think they are called) for climbing and scratching and such. Some are rather expensive, but others are reasonable. I think I could probably make something really cool for my cat, if not I'll buy one. He has outgrown his scratching post I made for him when I first got him.

Thank you all again. I am glad I found this site!
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Old July 5th, 2004, 02:18 PM
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We built this cathouse using scrap plywood and carpet remnants which we bought for about $20 (U.S.). You can't see it, but there's another round hole on the top just to the right of Puss-Puss' tail.
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  #16  
Old July 5th, 2004, 04:45 PM
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Please don't have the little guy declawed. As LR said it is very painful for them and if the blinds are the only thing your worried about its not worth it. One of my cats is a year old now and not once has she ever scratched me. We do keep her claws short and if you start at a young age they come to expect it. She doesn't mind having her feet handled at all. I don't let my cats out but its a little comforting to know that if she did get out and she needed to climb something to get away whether it be from a dog or something she would still be able too. Hope all these posts made it easier to make you decision.GOOD LUCK with the litte guy
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Old July 5th, 2004, 04:58 PM
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I agree with everything that has been said about declawing it's nothing but mutilation and not fair to the cat.
A cat-tree is simple to make,we used a 4x4 piece of lumber we already had,attached 3 shelves covered in left-over carpeting and sisal-rope.
I have 3 cats all with claws,2 cats we trim ourselves,my feisty tabby gets trimmed by the vet.
Here's the cat-tree.
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Old July 22nd, 2004, 01:48 AM
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Shae Shae is offline
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Declawing! What You Need To Know


What does it mean when a cat is declawed? How is it done? Examine these drawings. The cat's claw is not a toenail at the end of the toe as in other animals. It is movable digit attached to muscle as a finger might be. Note the strong ligaments and tendons which give power to extend and retract the claws. This is unique in cats. Without this your cat would not be able to properly grasp, hold or establish footing for proper walking, running, springing, climbing or stretching. Think of the cat as having 10 toes on each foot. Declawing is akin to cutting off half their toes. When the end digit, including the claw is removed, the sensory and motor nerves are cut, damaged and destroyed. They do not repair themselves or grow back for many months. Following the surgery there is a wooden lack of feeling, then a tingling sensation during the long convalescence while the cat must walk on the stub end of the second digit. Remember that during all this time the cat may not "rest" his feet as we would after a similar operation but must continue to scratch in his litter box, walk and attempt to jump as usual regardless of his pain.
Since cats have keener senses than humans, they suffer even more than humans. Many pain killing drugs, including aspirin, do not agree with cats and can cause illness or even death. Anyone who has had surgery will appreciate the problem that can be created by the inability to take pain-relieving medication. It is also possible for the claws to grow back, but often not in the normal manner, instead they may grow through the top or bottom of the paw, creating a bloody, painful sore. An Atlanta news station recently had a story of a declawing followed by infection so severe that the cat's foot had to be amputated.

The cat's body is especially well designed. The skeleton is better jointed and more elastic than most other animals and the muscles governing the lithe body are highly developed. This gives the cat great climbing power. The sharp claws can be whipped out for business or tucked neatly away. The elastic tendon holds the claw in its own sheath. The claw is flat on each side so it will slide in and out better. When the cat pulls his claw down with the use of the big tendon that lies along the under part of the toe, the ligament stretches like a fresh rubber band. It is hooked on the end for hanging on.

Cats like to keep their claws sharp and clean (and remove the outer sheath of the nail) by working on the scratching post you provide. Equipping your cat with the proper scratching post and taking the time to train him to use it will help preserve your furniture and carpets. Scratching posts made of soft carpeting teach your cat that soft fabrics, i.e. your sofa and rugs, are proper for scratching. A better idea are posts made of sisal rope or carpet turned inside out. This encourages your cat to scratch on hard, coarse surfaces. Training your cat to use this post takes some effort on your part. If you see him attempting to scratch on furniture or carpet, clap your hands sharply, say no! then pick him up gently and place him on the sisal post. (If stronger measures are needed, you might also want to keep a squirt bottle with plain water handy.) If your cat seems to prefer a particular area, try covering it with aluminum foil for a while. Catnip-treated cardboard scratchers, best used lying flat, are also effective. Most cats are pretty smart and after a short time, and much praise, will get the idea. It is also essential to properly clip your cat's claws with a well-made cat claw scissors. The sharp hook must be clipped off without injuring the pink quick. Cutting into the quick will hurt the cat and you will have a difficult time holding him quiet the next time.

Besides the physical mutilation, consider what declawing may do to the cat's emotions, the personality changes that may occur. Knowing he has not the means to defend himself, some cats follow the precept of the best defense is a good offense, and will bite at the least provocation (and it may truly be the least provocation.) Others become depressed and lose the loving personality that made you choose him to start with.

"The Learning Channel" had a series of documentaries about cats in January of 1993 and again in July 1995 and several of their comments were appropriate to this flyer. In one segment a cat owner spoke to a pet psychologist about her biting cat. It was no surprise to me when she admitted that the cat was declawed. Another segment showed a kitten being declawed. The commentator said that declawing was an American procedure and, in fact, most veterinarians in other countries refuse to do the operation.

I have recently heard about another nasty piece of business that some veterinarians are advocating as an "alternative" to Declawing; Tendonectomy--the cutting of the tendons themselves to prevent the claws from being extended. This is a bad, if not worse, than declawing itself. The claws continue to grow and constant maintenance of trimming must be done for the rest of the cat's life. (The same trimming procedure that if done anyway will keep your cat's intact claws shortened, blunted and less damaging to your furniture.) Failure to trim claws in this situation will result in additional veterinary attention throughout the cat's life as the claws will grow around and into the paw pad of the foot. You can imagine how much daily pain a cat would have to go through in this condition.

If you really love your cat, you will want him to lead a long, happy life, giving and receiving love and affection. If you really love him, and care about him, don't declaw him.
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Old August 21st, 2004, 09:00 AM
AMELIA AMELIA is offline
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Cat declawing

You have to ask yourself why would you be getting the cat declawed? Is the cat is permanently damaging your furniture? I have had cats all my life and had to declaw my last two due to this reason. I tried and tried every alternative, for example scratch posts etc but no way, they still loved my expensive furniture and were doing some major damage. It was either declaw or put up for adoption. So I opted for the declaw. They are fine and now act like nothing ever happened. I have absolutely no regrets. Of course they are both indoor cats only. PS my best friend decided not to declaw because of all the bad things she heard about it, and only lasted two years She just brought her cat home from the vet and from getting declawed. He was an indoor cat also, and did major damage to their furniture. It was replacement time for the furniture and either get rid of the cat or declaw. It sounds cruel to declaw, but at least he has a good, loving home. Again,he is fine.
  #20  
Old October 11th, 2004, 03:05 AM
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cutiecherise cutiecherise is offline
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Good Choice!

I'm glad you decided not to declaw!

As for kids gettig scratched,
when i was 5 years old, a golden retreiver chased a young orange tabby on my backyard porch,
and me being the little good samaritan,
tried to pull it away from the dog,

Of course, kitty didn't think i was a very good defence mechanism,
but i certainly added some space between him and the dog as he climbed frantically up my face.

I am now 20,
and i still have scars on my cheek from that incident.

...
Do i regret being scratched?
No, not really.
It horrified my parents because it made me so unbearable to look at, and they were ashamed because i'd never be a model, and it hurt a bit,
but
If i were to take back every incident and occassion in which i learned something which could have left a mark,
I would probably have learned very little in my life.

Not that i'm not regularly scratched by cats since that day,
butat least i now know how to hold them so they can't climb up my face while fleeing.
  #21  
Old October 11th, 2004, 01:04 PM
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heeler's rock! heeler's rock! is offline
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I am also strongly against declawing a cat, however, I had a similar situation as krd had.

When I got my first kitty ever, Puff, at the Lethbridge Humane Society, she had claws. She is a gorgeous cat, and I loved her to death! I kept her with her claws the whole time I was in Lethbridge and I brought her home to my parents house when I moved back to Calgary. Puff started tearing up my mom's favourite chairs and the side of the couch was gone in a matter of months. All that was left was wood. Puff was doing immense damage to my mom's furniture. I tried getting her used to a scratching post and everything, but my mom insisted that if I didn't get Puff declawed, she wouldn't let me keep her.

I knew people that wanted Puff, but I couldn't bear to say goodbye to my best friend, and I didn't know the people that well. The neighbour said she'd take Puff, but she has 2 horrible, animal abusing kids and I would never EVER subject Puff to that.

I talked to my mom about alternatives like Soft Paws (the rubber caps for claws), but she didn't want to have to replace them every 4 weeks because her nails grew. I tried trimming Puff's nails, it didn't stop her. Finally, my mom said enough. Either Puff got declawed or she was taking her to the humane society. My mom decided to renovate and replace the furniture, and she didn't want Puff destroying the new furniture. My mom was also getting burbur (sp?) carpeting and if you snag it, the whole thing comes undone!

I had no choice. I felt aweful and made my mom miserable for what she had done. I told her that she mutilated Puff and that it wasn't right. I also then told my mom that since she wanted it so bad, Puff was now her responsibility. Since Puff could no longer defend herself, I chose not to bring her with me when I got married, and made my mom and sister her primary caregivers, as I have 3 dogs and it wasn't fair to Puff. Lucily, Puff was okay after the surgery and I tended to her 24/7 to make sure she didn't hurt herself.

My mom is now happy and I still make her feel bad every now and then for declawing Puff, but what's done is done and Puff has a great home with my sister who loves that cat with all her heart. Puff loves my sister too and I couldn't imagine Puff anywhere else.

My 2 cats now are not declawed and never will be. I have been able to train them pretty well though and I trim their nails regularly.
  #22  
Old October 11th, 2004, 02:41 PM
.unknown. .unknown. is offline
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Any of the cat's i've had including the one i currently own, have their claws.
The only point in my life i've ever been scratched by them is when they were kittens.

If you can't take the time to train your cat to use a scratching post, or are afraid of the cat scratching your kids or you, don't get one.

I doubt you would bring a dog into your home if you thought it would bite your children. Like someone said earlier, when a cat has no claws it tend to bite. Cat bites are not pretty. A friend's husband got bit by their cat and ended up with a blood infection. They carry bad bacteria in their mouths.

And to be honest,My dog has scratched me more in her younger days than both mine and friends cats combined.

Animals really, when involved with humans have no other choice but to adjust to whatever the human wants.... So why make it painful and uncomfortable?

I'm fairly sure i've only reiterated what has already been said, i doubt it will change anyone's minds...

i still fail to see how cutting off a cat's toes is for it's own health.

if you have other pets, you can train them too.

but maybe it's just easier to alter your cat.

i dunno.

it's didn't seem like that much work for me..
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