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Old July 29th, 2010, 09:41 PM
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Mmmm, I vaguely remember answering your morning glory question before. Guess you didn't like my answer.
From: http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/l...108225028.html

Morning Glories can respond differently to variables


Posted by ron_convolvulaceae 6a/5b (My Page) on Tue, Oct 17, 06 at 6:03
Morning Glories can exhibit delayed blooming from a number of different causes including excessive Nitrogen levels in conjunction with temperature and lighting variables...
the sum total of all environmental factors and variables exert an inter-connected and sometimes synergistic effect...ratios of relevant factors can vary alot and so also does the response of the plants...
The observance of 2 plants responding very differently when exposed to the same environment is an example of the adaptive genetic diversity present in the plants...the plant that blooms well in one environment may not bloom well in another and vice versa...

Growing your next crop of plants from seeds collected from plants that responded the way you would like to see them respond is more likely to result in plants that are the most satisfying for you...

Seeds collected from plants that grew and flowered well in your(!) zone(!) or a climate zone most similar to your own will in all likihood yield the best results...this includes summer and winter high and low temperatures as well as growing season daily(!) average(!) temperatures...
latitude is also a factor because the Electro-magnetic spectrum(!) of sunlight varies at different latitudes...additionally >mountainous areas receive a different spectrum of sunlight than comparatively very low areas like valleys...

The ratio(!) of all the essential and non-essential Macro and Micro nutrients will affect the growth and flowering response of the plants...a ratio that works well in Portland,OR may not work well for someone in Dallas,TX or Chicago,Tampa or New York...

Nitrogen in excessive amounts can sometimes delay flowering,but since the word 'fertilizer' and even 'nutrient' are fuzzy terms that actually can refer to at least 25 or more elements...it it better to be more specific in relation to the particular element(s) being referred to...

Plants can respond to both essential and non-essential(!) elements and nutrient like substances...again the ratios(!) of all substances present can exert widely varying results > and are often almost impossible to calculate in their vast all-inclusive sum total entirety...

The trace minerals can affect the growth and flowering behaviour of plants,but the sum total of all environmental factors involved including the ever important ratios(!) are often very difficult to ascertain completely...
so an intelligent guesstimate is the best that can most often be arrived at with regard to providing a plant with what will most likely induce it to behave the way we as individuals would enjoy...

The macro nutrient Phosphorus is most often bloom stimulating and Potassium is good for healthy root systems...and although excessive(!) levels of the macro nutrient Nitrogen can result in delayed blooming
>too little(!) Nitrogen can also delay blooming and reduce the overall viability of seeds...

Every particular situation and person may discover a particular strain of plants and a combination of climate and soil conditions that work out well for them...if a particular formula works for you > continue with it...

Seeds harvested from plants that have displayed the features that you like >that originate from overall conditions most similar to your own present growing conditions are more likely to do well >in your(!)particular garden than seeds that come from plants that were grown in significantly different overall growing conditions...
that is why saving the seeds from your own plants that do well in your(!) own garden is a very important factor
>because these seeds are most likely to re-produce plants that are progressively better adapted to your own particular growing conditions...

Hope this is helpful and continue to Enjoy...

TTY,...

Ron

Did you start the seed yourself? What did you use for soil? Did you add fertilizer? It is quite possible the soil is just too rich for the morning glory. If you got it from a nursery then they probably used fertilizer to "boost" it along. Therefore you probably won't get flowers this year.

From what I've read on gardening sites other people are having problems with the same thing this year.
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