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Old March 29th, 2013, 07:36 AM
Longblades Longblades is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2007
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Quote:
Once she's in her bed or on the couch, she will not move unless we pick her up (see issue no. 2!) so he can approach her and pet her or pick her up with no reaction (and recently she has started giving him little kisses because he leaves his face in front of her for long enough lol) but if he moves too quickly or if she has to pass by him to get from one room to another, she gets afraid and scrambles to get away.
I find this to be very scary. J. is threatening her. J. should not be putting his face so close to a timid dog that she can kiss him. I know J. doesn't mean to threaten her but one day she might get up enough confidence to tell him to back off and bite him. She's barely been with you a month. Don't put your face right in front of her. In many species, humans included, staring, close face contact are social taboos and are threatening to the receiving parties.

Did you see or read the Horse Whisperer? Let her come to you. Even though she is a predator species she's acting like a prey species. With such you encourage by not approaching, rather letting them decide to approach you. It might take a long time. It might take a year. It might be that she is not a natural born cuddler and she never intitiates cuddles and kisses and close contact on her own.

A couple of really, really good treats, you sitting with your side to her so she doesn't have to face your eyes and let her decide to come get them. Let her have them with no strings attached. Normally we don't treat without a job being done for us first but rules are made to be broken and in this case I think reassurance is your biggest priority.
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