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Old February 14th, 2013, 11:21 AM
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sugarcatmom sugarcatmom is offline
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Location: Calgary, AB
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phoozles View Post
I have decided to go with the radio-iodine therapy.
Good decision! This will actually cure the hyperT, whereas the meds only control symptoms and don't prevent the tumor from growing further. There are situations where it's better to go with the meds (for instance, a geriatric or extremely fearful cat that wouldn't do well away from home during the I-131 treatment), but I'm sure Jake will do great.

Quote:
Originally Posted by phoozles View Post
Funny though, my vet said that it would be best if he was on a low protein diet in case he does have some renal failure, so wants me to feed him k/d now..


Definitely do not feed K/D!!! Absolutely horrific food and completely the wrong way to deal with feline renal issues. A cat with CKD needs what all cats should be eating: quality MEAT-based protein with sufficient moisture. In cases of advanced kidney disease, phosphorus levels may need to be kept on the lower side but that doesn't necessarily mean also lowering protein. My almost 20 yr old guy has had stage III CKD for the past 3 years and he eats predominantly a raw diet, along with canned Wellness, Nature's Variety, Weruva, Precise, etc, for snacking on between meals. He's doing fantastic (no weight loss, good appetite, no vomiting), far surpassing the average lifespan of cats eating K/D in various "studies". Here is a good discussion of protein requirements for older cats and dogs:
The Nutrient Your Pet Needs More of As They Age: Protein
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