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Old September 12th, 2012, 05:37 PM
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sugarcatmom sugarcatmom is offline
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Location: Calgary, AB
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MicheleR25 View Post
The vet said that the ultrasound ruled out any inflammation and the lining of the bladder looked normal so he said he can almost rule out IC.
I'm wondering if it's possible that there just wasn't any inflammation during the ultrasound. Since IC often waxes and wanes in cats, it could be that the physiological manifestation wasn't significant enough to notice at the time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MicheleR25 View Post
He won't drink plain water (and I would figure raw meat had enough moisture in it)
My cats rarely drink, but I do add a tsp or 2 of extra water to their food (half ground raw and half high quality canned - separate meals, not mixed together). I think for most cats a raw diet should provide sufficient moisture, but it doesn't look like that's the case for Houdini.... or at least not at the time the urine sample was taken. Was he fasted prior to the test? Do you have any other lab results done at other times to compare too?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MicheleR25 View Post
Is the protein in the urine normal and something not to worry about?
I would say that in this case, the proteinuria might have been influenced by the high USG and the fact that Houdini also had blood in his urine (hematuria). How was the urine sample obtained? Hematuria can sometimes be from cystocentisis or manual expression, but also bladder/urinary tract inflammation or bacterial infection or stress/physical exertion.

If possible, you might want to have another urinalysis done in a month or 2 to keep an eye on things, especially that USG.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MicheleR25 View Post
Is he eating too much? Too much protein? He's 10.5lbs (ideal weight for him) and hasn't gained or lost any through all this.
I'd say his diet is just fine then. I don't believe too much protein is an issue when cats are fed a whole prey raw meat diet. It may indeed have an effect on lab work results, where *normals* are determined by the masses (the "masses" being mostly kibble-fed cats). So for instance, a BUN level that's a bit higher than the usual range is easily attributable to a raw diet containing higher (ie more species-appropriate) protein levels than what you'd see in the average commercial cat food. No biggie.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MicheleR25 View Post
The vet seemed most concerned with his specific gravity and neutrality of his urine. Is there anything I should be looking at and watching or are the slight highs not enough to worry about?
Urine ph fluctuates throughout the day, so I wouldn't worry about it too much at this point. What you might want to do is pick up some ph test strips from a health food store and see if you can get a few readings at home. If they were all 7.0 and above, then you could look into adding an acidifier to Houdini's diet (such as L-methionine). I would only add the acidifier if you can monitor his urine ph though. If it fishtails the other way and becomes too acidic, he could end up with calcium oxalate crystal formation, which can be much more difficult to deal with.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MicheleR25 View Post
In regards to play, he has my other cat
How do the 2 of them get along? How many litter boxes do you have, where are they located, and how often are they scooped? The placement and cleanliness of litter boxes can be a huge factor with FLUTD. For instance, if Houdini was either startled while using the box one day, or it wasn't as clean as he preferred, or the other cat was preventing his access to it (even by something as seemingly benign as lying across the doorway to the room it was in) may have set a precedent for him choosing more desirable (to him!) locations.

Have you ever tried Dr. Elsey's Cat Attract litter? It contains a herbal additive that makes many cats want to pee on it. Worked great for the feral cat I brought inside that had never used a litter box before.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MicheleR25 View Post
I tried feliway diffusers and concentrated spray but he peed near it and aside from the first day, didn't seem to notice it.
That's too bad. Feliway doesn't work with all cats, but when it does it's a godsend.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MicheleR25 View Post
I currently have a sentry collar (pheromones) on him and am hoping that might help.
Something else that might be worth looking into are flower essences, such as this one by Spirit Essences: http://www.spiritessences.com/product-p/ur-fine.htm

Quote:
Originally Posted by MicheleR25 View Post
Nothing has really changed in the house that would cause this
I do still think stress possibly has a role to play here. You mentioned in your first post that he would pee out of "vengeance when left alone for too long". That sounds like maybe the disruption in routine was an instigating factor. Some cats can be extraordinarily precise in when they think certain events should take place (meal times, for example) and if those don't occur accordingly, their anxiety levels skyrocket. I have a cat like that. He doesn't pee outside the box, but if his breakfast or dinner is late he yowls frantically and at extreme volume (and I'm sure my neighbours must raise an eyebrow or two when my windows are open. Doesn't help that he's also mostly deaf.). There is no easy answer for dealing with cats like that except to try to accommodate as much of their need for routine as is feasible and still have a life.

Sometimes a holistic vet can help by utilizing other healing modalities (homeopathy, acupuncture, TCM, etc) and focusing on aspects that a conventional vet might miss.

I have a couple links for you to check out, but I warn you that they're uber-technical and are as likely to put you to sleep as to provide any insight.

http://canadianveterinarians.net/Spe...itter_box.html
http://www.scribd.com/doc/23751685/F...Disease-Part-I

Oh, and another link with a holistic perspective: http://www.holisticat.com/flutd.html
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We must not refuse to see with our eyes what they must endure with their bodies. ~ Gretchen Wyler

Last edited by sugarcatmom; September 12th, 2012 at 05:38 PM. Reason: added link
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