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Old April 13th, 2011, 02:52 PM
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TeriM TeriM is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by millitntanimist View Post
Dogs play for the same reason all animals do (including us) - to develop good social skills, to build physical endurance and, well, to have fun
There is nothing wrong with how your dog is trying to play with you - "keep away" is a very common game - but if it's not the way you want them to engage you teach them other games you want to play instead (i.e. tug, fetch, "find it" etc.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by millitntanimist View Post
I have not read her book but I have looked into the author. I totally agree with part of her philosophy, but some of her methodologies are grounded in fairly specious science.

I found these books very informing and interesting, maybe you might like them too?

http://www.amazon.com/Other-End-Leas...ref=pd_sim_b_5

http://www.amazon.com/Dogs-Understan...2613872&sr=1-1

http://www.amazon.com/Talking-Terms-...ef=pd_sim_b_13
I agree with both these posts . Play is an excellent way to improve your relationship with your dog and is an amazing training tool. Please don't read all sorts of alpha things into your dog wanting to play with you. Take it as a compliment that your dog enjoys interacting with you. It is important to teach an "off switch" so you aren't being demanded to play all the time but that can be easily taught with positive methods.
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