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-   -   Does Anyone Know What Kind Of Tree This Is? (http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=76940)

luckypenny May 13th, 2011 05:02 PM

Does Anyone Know What Kind Of Tree This Is?
 
1 Attachment(s)
It grows tall and slender and gives off such a wonderful sweet/woodsy scent. We only have one growing and I'd like to plant more if I knew what they were.

Winston May 13th, 2011 05:58 PM

LP can you post a picture of the leaves? :thumbs up

SamIam May 13th, 2011 06:11 PM

Columnar Swedish Aspen?

luckypenny May 13th, 2011 06:43 PM

1 Attachment(s)
[QUOTE=Winston;1009288]LP can you post a picture of the leaves? :thumbs up[/QUOTE]

Camera battery died...then I remembered dh bought me a scanner :D.

[ATTACH]73850[/ATTACH]



[QUOTE=SamIam;1009291]Columnar Swedish Aspen?[/QUOTE]

Just looked it up and it could be that. And I just noticed there are quite a lot of them growing in the woods behind our house but they're pretty fragile looking in comparison (probably cuz the woods are so thick). I'm wondering if I can transplant some if I find babies?

shirley1011 May 13th, 2011 06:45 PM

Looks like a poplar to me!

luckypenny May 13th, 2011 07:00 PM

The leaf does look like that of a black poplar :confused:. But I'm not sure if they grow as slender? Just googled images and there are so many varieties, it's hard to tell.

Winston May 13th, 2011 07:15 PM

If I had to guess I too would think poplar but your right LP there are so many varieties.

I would dig up a few of the young ones and put them in pots and see how they do but then again if you have a lot at your disposal than maybe just dig up a nice big clump of dirt with it and transplant see what happens. I find that if you take enough of the roots and dirt you usually end up lucky.

Tundra_Queen May 13th, 2011 08:12 PM

LP...I was going to say popular too...cause the ones up here grow very slender and some have trees popping all over their lawns from the roots. So keep an eye out for that. They also lose branches and leaves quite often in windstorms and don't live as long as Oaks and such. Usually trees that grow quickly also die at a young age.

SamIam May 13th, 2011 08:21 PM

You can transplant them, they're hardy. If it's a poplar and not aspen, be careful where you put it. They have invasive roots that can block sewer drains.

Melinda May 13th, 2011 08:27 PM

poplar....we have hundreds around us, come visit, we'll cross the road and dig a bunch up! I really like them cause they grow tall and straight

luckypenny May 13th, 2011 08:50 PM

TQ, I haven't noticed any popping up in the lawn :shrug: (then again, it's always mowed).

Melinda, do the trees have an unusually strong scent to them?

I think there used to be a few more both in the front and back yards (and other neighbors' yards) but some disease had got to them. Everyone had cut theirs down as they were dead. The one remaining looks young and must have grown from the one that died, I think, as it's growing right smack next to the trunk that had been cut.

Melinda May 13th, 2011 09:00 PM

if you mean a musky/musty smell, then yes, but only in the spring, me, I love the noise of the wind going through these tree's

Gail P May 13th, 2011 11:07 PM

LP what did you google? depending on what words you used you might find non native species coming up which will make it more confusing. It's been a looong time since the forestry classes I had back in college, but I seem to recall that the species native to Canada are Trembling Aspen, Largetooth Aspen and Poplar. That doesn't look like a Trembling Aspen leaf, try looking up the other two and see if you get some pics that match up with your tree. If it doesn't look like either of them and you suspect it's a native tree (growing in the bush I'd assume so) as opposed to an ornamental, just google native poplars of Canada, or native aspen etc.

chico2 May 14th, 2011 08:09 AM

My first thought was Poplar too.
When we bought our house,there was actually 25 Poplars the former owners had planted as a very tall hedge,we had shoots everywhere,some of the trees were halfdead.
We had to take them down(we meaning hubby and sons:laughing:),normally I don't cut down trees,but these had to go..I believe they are considered weeds in the Tree-World.
However if you have a huge property,I cannot see why you can't plant some more.

SamIam May 14th, 2011 12:00 PM

I wonder how many of the ornamental types sold at greenhouses are natural versus with grafted roots?

doggy lover May 14th, 2011 07:05 PM

We have trembling aspen up at our cottage and the trees get huge and from where I see you have it this wouldn't be a good idea.. is the bark of the tree a smooth greenish white? is the under part of the leaf white? But it does look some kind of a aspen or poplar to me too:2cents:

luckypenny May 14th, 2011 08:16 PM

[QUOTE=Gail P;1009343]If it doesn't look like either of them and you suspect it's a native tree (growing in the bush I'd assume so) as opposed to an ornamental, just google native poplars of Canada, or native aspen etc.[/QUOTE]

Great idea, Gail. Thank you!

[QUOTE=doggy lover;1009471]We have trembling aspen up at our cottage and the trees get huge and from where I see you have it this wouldn't be a good idea.. is the bark of the tree a smooth greenish white? is the under part of the leaf white? But it does look some kind of a aspen or poplar to me too:2cents:[/QUOTE]

The lower trunk is very rough and cracked-like. And the underleaf is is green. I wouldn't plant any close to the house (that one was there before the house was built and before we bought it). I was thinking of planting something like it between us and one of the neighbors.

Twocents May 14th, 2011 08:20 PM

Lombardy poplar, I think.



:2cents:

hazelrunpack May 14th, 2011 08:50 PM

That was my thought, too, Twocents. They're very popular because they grow up so fast and make a lovely green 'fence'. The downside is that they have a very short lifespan--probably less than 30 years. But while they're green and growing, they're lovely graceful things...

luckypenny May 14th, 2011 08:52 PM

Just looked up Lombardi Poplar and, if that's what it is, I should be worried about the roots :eek:. I found Balsam Poplar (native to Qc), and while the shape of the tree isn't exact, the description of the strong scent is. I'll keep searching until I find out what it is though.

hazelrunpack May 14th, 2011 08:54 PM

That was the one thing that didn't fit--I don't remember the Lombardy poplars having much of a scent!

binkybuff May 14th, 2011 09:31 PM

I am wondering if it is a Laural Leaf Poplar. Not sure if that is the full name or not, or if it is just called a Laural Poplar.

take care
binky

Gail P May 14th, 2011 09:49 PM

Another idea...if google brings up too many different varieties besides the native species...see if you can find a copy of Native Trees of Canada at the library. Can't remember who the author is now and I don't have a copy of it myself.

Really though, besides satisfying your own curiosity about the species you don't even need to know. Knowing the name won't likely help you much if it's a native species, the nursery's probably only carry ornamental varieties. Anyways, if there are others growing in the bush nearby you should be able to find some saplings to transplant. You can just call them your mystery trees :D Most trees transplant best in the cooler weather when the ground has more moisture. From about May onwards if you try you'll need to do a lot of watering for most trees. Poplars are pretty hardy though, very hard to kill when they're growing somewhere you don't want them. Usually they keep popping up all over the place from the roots and little shoots will sprout up from cut stumps too.

luckypenny May 14th, 2011 10:03 PM

Thank you, Binkybuff. There's not much on the internet though about Laurel Poplar (even with it's Latin name) :shrug:.

[QUOTE=Gail P;1009508]Another idea...if google brings up too many different varieties besides the native species...see if you can find a copy of Native Trees of Canada at the library. Can't remember who the author is now and I don't have a copy of it myself.[/QUOTE]

By [B]R.C. Hosie[/B]. I just came across the title of the book not 5 minutes ago :D. Our library only has French books though. I'll see if I can find a copy somewhere.

[QUOTE=Gail P;1009508]Really though, besides satisfying your own curiosity about the species you don't even need to know. Knowing the name won't likely help you much if it's a native species, the nursery's probably only carry ornamental varieties. Anyways, if there are others growing in the bush nearby you should be able to find some saplings to transplant. You can just call them your mystery trees :D Most trees transplant best in the cooler weather when the ground has more moisture. From about May onwards if you try you'll need to do a lot of watering for most trees. Poplars are pretty hardy though, very hard to kill when they're growing somewhere you don't want them. Usually they keep popping up all over the place from the roots and little shoots will sprout up from cut stumps too.[/QUOTE]

I just may plant them where I was thinking of. Only problem now is I'm worrying about the roots of the one growing right next to the house :rolleyes:.

SamIam May 14th, 2011 10:10 PM

You should be able to get someone to mark where your sewer line runs and just stay away from that.

luckypenny May 14th, 2011 10:19 PM

No sewer lines here, SIA. We have a septic system that's on the other side of the yard, the well is in the front yard. It's the house's foundation I'm worrying about :o.

hazelrunpack May 14th, 2011 10:27 PM

Roots infiltrate where there are nutrients. So septic systems and sewer lines are prime 'targets' for roots to get into. Not sure they'd be as much of a threat to a foundation unless they were attracted to the out-flow pipe to the septic system.

luckypenny May 14th, 2011 10:33 PM

Thank you Hazel, I think you just prevented an anxiety attack :D.

hazelrunpack May 14th, 2011 10:49 PM

:laughing: Whew! :D

SamIam May 14th, 2011 11:01 PM

They are notorious for sewer/septic lines but will sometimes go for fresh water pipes as well. Other than that they'll leave your house alone, they don't touch foundations, gas, cable, wires, they're just looking for a drink.


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