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-   -   Canning beans? (http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=64774)

Gail P August 10th, 2009 08:18 PM

Canning beans?
 
Does anyone have a recipe/failsafe instructions for how to can green and yellow beans? Every year I grow them and every year I end up giving tons of them away when they're freshly picked because I have so many. I tried freezing some once but that didn't go so well. I don't know if I didn't blanch them properly or if the problem was the beans themselves (back when the garden was new the soil wasn't as good plus it didn't get a lot of water as we used to have a shallow dug well that sometimes went dry). :shrug: The frozen beans turned out really tough and tasteless, I ended up throwing them out or feeding them to the chickens or something. I'm not really a big fan of frozen beans anyhow so I'd like to learn how to can them. Seems silly to give them away now and then end up buying canned beans in the winter :crazy:

CearaQC August 10th, 2009 10:55 PM

Basically you can just pack them tight in the jar almost up to the lid line, leaving the right space at the top, pour in boiling water, salt optional. Remove any air bubbles, seal with the hot lid and ring and process in pressure canner for somewhere between 10-20 minutes in 15 psi for pint jars, probably longer for quart jars.

I'm not sure on the amount of time, but that's basically it. Peas too don't take long either.

We used to pick bushels and bushels of beans in our family garden when we were kids and mom would plunk us down on the floor surrounded with newspaper and a giant bowl, put on a good old movie like a western and my brothers and I would sit there shelling/snapping beans all afternoon. Then when our bowls were full mom would take them and process right away. Jars would sit on the counter all night long to cool. It was fun putting food away like that. I wish everyone could do it.

But anyhow that's how my mom does it.

Gail P August 11th, 2009 01:18 PM

[QUOTE=CearaQC;812574]Basically you can just pack them tight in the jar almost up to the lid line, leaving the right space at the top, pour in boiling water, salt optional. Remove any air bubbles, seal with the hot lid and ring and process in pressure canner for somewhere between 10-20 minutes in 15 psi for pint jars, probably longer for quart jars.

I'm not sure on the amount of time, but that's basically it. Peas too don't take long either.

We used to pick bushels and bushels of beans in our family garden when we were kids and mom would plunk us down on the floor surrounded with newspaper and a giant bowl, put on a good old movie like a western and my brothers and I would sit there shelling/snapping beans all afternoon. Then when our bowls were full mom would take them and process right away. Jars would sit on the counter all night long to cool. It was fun putting food away like that. I wish everyone could do it.

But anyhow that's how my mom does it.[/QUOTE]

Thanks, that sounds pretty easy. Except, I don't have a pressure canner. Would it work doing them in boiling water do you think? That's how I make apple jelly and grape jelly. I boil them up good and when they come out the lids snap down. Or I wonder if they'd even need to be boiled if they have boiling water poured over them? When I do dilled pickles I just pour the boiling brine solution over them put the lids on and turn them upside down and then leave them overnight to cool. The next day I turn them rightside up and check that they've all sealed. That's the way an old friend of my mom's used to do it and how I learned to make them.

CearaQC August 11th, 2009 04:04 PM

Yeah pickles you can get away with that method because the vinegar is an acid and acts as a preservative. Same way for tomatoes. They only need the hot water bath. But non acid food items need the pressure method. Stuff like peas, carrots, corn, etc. Unless you're doing pickled veg with vinegar. And with jelly and jam, the sugar acts as a preservative.

The Victorians used to layer beans in salt in giant crocks to preserve.

If you just use the pint jars you can get away with one of the smaller pressure cookers instead of the pressure canners. I got mine for $40 last year at Canadian Tire.


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