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-   -   Dog Reverse Sneezing - Answered by Dr. Van Lienden (http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=2575)

mensa December 17th, 2003 05:27 AM

Dog Reverse Sneezing?????????
 
I have a 2 year old West Highland White Terrier bitch, who for the past 2 days has been what i would describe as reverse sneezing, she is snorting inwardly which seems to panic her at the time, it can last for 2 or 3 snorts or as many as 10-15 at a time, she has been in excellent health up until now. there is no evidence of mucus, and the snort sounds very dry.
Can anyone tell me what is wrong with her?

Lucky Rescue December 17th, 2003 10:52 AM

My dog does this often. What I do is put my fingers firmly on her throat and press - that seems to stop the spasms. You can also try covering her nostrils for a second or two.


But if your dog has never done this before, you might want to get him checked out.

Luba December 17th, 2003 01:51 PM

I had a westie cross and he did the same sort of thing

He unfortunately had asthma and thats how it began with this funny inhaled type sneezing/coughing spasm

If it's just an allergy, maybe think back towards anything new added to your home or what you use on your floors and carpets for cleaning. It could just be allergy related.

If it's asthma or u think it may be asthma then get her to a vet for sure.


Luba

mensa December 18th, 2003 11:42 AM

RE:
 
thanks for the replies, as it happens she is seemingly on the mend, the snorting is all but gone, i fear it might have been a reaction to the huge amount of hairspray being used by my wife in the mornings, maybe it had caused some kind of irritation in her nasal lining.
thanks again.

Luba December 18th, 2003 02:25 PM

Well thats great news!!

Get natural hair sprays non aerosol, they work great!!

petdr January 7th, 2004 08:24 AM

This sounds like epiglottal entrapment, and can show up at any time. I see it usually in overweight dogs, however lean dogs also can be troubled. The epiglottis is a flap of tissue that will close over the trachea while swallowing. The esophagous lies above the trachea and if this flap of tissue were not automatically engaged by a neurologic reflex to close over the trachea, then food/water/saliva/mucous/etc. would enter the lungs with dire
consequences.

If there is excessive soft tissue (elongated soft palate, skin
folds, fat, etc.) then the epiglottis can be caught in the closed position, consequently the dog has difficulty getting adequate breath. Panic ensues further adding to oxygen deficit, and fainting/blacking-out may occur.

The condition is not considered lethal but does impact life quality. In severe cases surgery is an option, however if the dog is overweight, then dieting may be all that is needed. Have your veterinarian evaluate her and make recommendations based on the severity of her condition.

Dr. Van Lienden

Dr. Raymond Van Lienden DVM
The Animal Clinic of Clifton
12702 Chapel Road, Clifton
Virginia, U.S.A. 20124
703-802-0490

patsea February 19th, 2010 09:50 AM

[QUOTE=petdr;7798]This sounds like epiglottal entrapment, and can show up at any time. I see it usually in overweight dogs, however lean dogs also can be troubled. The epiglottis is a flap of tissue that will close over the trachea while swallowing. The esophagous lies above the trachea and if this flap of tissue were not automatically engaged by a neurologic reflex to close over the trachea, then food/water/saliva/mucous/etc. would enter the lungs with dire
consequences.

If there is excessive soft tissue (elongated soft palate, skin
folds, fat, etc.) then the epiglottis can be caught in the closed position, consequently the dog has difficulty getting adequate breath. Panic ensues further adding to oxygen deficit, and fainting/blacking-out may occur.

The condition is not considered lethal but does impact life quality. In severe cases surgery is an option, however if the dog is overweight, then dieting may be all that is needed. Have your veterinarian evaluate her and make recommendations based on the severity of her condition.

Dr. Van Lienden

Dr. Raymond Van Lienden DVM
The Animal Clinic of Clifton
12702 Chapel Road, Clifton
Virginia, U.S.A. 20124
703-802-0490[/QUOTE]

Dr.Van Lieden, my 8 yr old pom has been having cyanosis episodes that have progressed over a year. he was slightly overweight, but has lost the extra weight and still having problems. he is surgery today to have his palate trimmed at u. penn.pa.the Dr. said his palate was mildly elongated and a moderate stenotic caudal nasopharynx. my question is after surgery will that help with opening of airway? have you had similar cases were surgery helped.

Deauce February 19th, 2010 02:30 PM

My 6yr old Golden does the same thing - but only once in a blue moon. However, not in the last two years or so. She is not at all overweight. For a female she is tall, 22.5" at the shoulders and weights 59lbs. But, it really freaks me out when she does it. It can carry on for several minutes, and the look in her eyes, tells me she is freaking out too. It just about seems like a panic attack. I just try and console her by voice and petting. I hadn't thought of rubbing her throat. Is there anything else that can be done, at that very moment, to help it subside? Is there a possibility this might actually be, a panic attack of sorts?? (It seemed to happen when I was going through a rough time in my own life - could it have been associated :confused:)


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