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-   -   Looking for a Reputable breeder. (http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=18613)

mindis12 February 13th, 2007 01:11 PM

I believe thatanyone that wishes to breed must:

1) Become educated
2) BE RESPONSIBLE
3) RESPECT ALL AND AND EVERYONE! DOGS AND POTENTIAL PURCHASERS
4) BE WHO THEY SAY THEY ARE, RATHER THAN MAKE UP A WHOLE LOAD OF LIES!

Why do I bring this up? Well just this year I meet a individual, this person wanted too learn wanted to get somewhere in breeding! I beleived in the individual. Gave the person the right directions, then find out latter that the individual took my advise, too throw it too the wind.

Picking up mixed breed dogs, making claim that they are pure! Is just out landish. Breeding dogs each and every heat is just insane! The reason to breed is to IMPROVE not too lie and or get rich off of them! Dogs are to be loved nothing less!!!! In the last 35 years I have seen and heard it all! It is up too the pro's too take the time to establish and educate.

When you do just be so aware on who you are dealing with! You may get a ruid awakening in the long run.

mona_b February 14th, 2007 12:21 AM

[QUOTE=Prin;372648]True, but a good breeder would be followed by a mentor breeder (the breeder who bred the dogs the new breeder is using), and the new breeder wouldn't be starting from scratch with no reputation, as the line of dogs would have a reputation of its own.

Even the "professional" breeders (the ones who do breed for money) have it in their contracts that there is a large sum of money as a sort of fine if the new owner of the dog isn't neutered by a certain date. You really should consider it so your dogs don't end up intact and end up in puppymills or in the hands of unethical breeders.[/QUOTE]

You are sooo right Prin.

Your breeder is always your mentor.He/she is the one to be asking questions about showing,health/genetic testing,temperment testing and so on.

[QUOTE=i_have_too_many] I do not "demand" the dog be fixed, I can not police that, I had never heard of saying you will sue someone for not getting the dog fixed, I dont think too many breeders have that in their contracts
[/QUOTE]

Yes you can Police it.You have a s/n contract.MANY breeders have this.And yes,they have it in their contract that they will sue you.As I have stated before,I was on a neuter contract.If I did not have my boys done at 6 months,she had the right to take me to court and sue me for $5000.That was for each of my dogs.

Think about what Prin said.Would you want someone you sold your pups to become BYB"s?Would you want the females bred in their first heat?Would you want them to pass on a health/genetic issue to their pups?Every responsible breeder I know has a s/n contract.For them,this is a must.

Do you tell the new owners to have their dogs health/genetic tested at the ages it supposed to be done?

In 23 years of raising 3 GSD's from my breeder,we kept in contact the whole time up untill her death in 2006.:sad:

clm February 26th, 2007 10:15 AM

I've bought 2 dogs from breeders over the years, all with spay/neuter clauses, but none with the threat of suing if the spay/neuter isn't done.

It can be very difficult to find a breeder sometimes, depending on the breed, it can take months to finally find a puppy and then to add the possiblility of being sued if you don't get the dog spayed or neutered by 6 months of age, you'll just be driving some people to backyard breeders and pet stores. I wouldn't sign such a contract, not because I won't get a dog spayed or neutered. I always do, I just prefer to get male dogs done closer to their first birthday. I've never had a problem with getting a puppy from a breeder once I've found one, although I have found some breeders I wouldn't even consider getting a puppy from. Not everyone who is trying to get a puppy is an irresponsible idiot, so if you treat people as such and make getting a puppy as difficult as you can, then they will find alternate resources and that makes the breeders part of the problem as well in my opinion.

clm

calicogal March 12th, 2007 10:03 PM

strip mall puppy mill?
 
[QUOTE=clm;381430]It can be very difficult to find a breeder sometimes, depending on the breed, it can take months to finally find a puppy and then to add the possiblility of being sued if you don't get the dog spayed or neutered by 6 months of age, you'll just be driving some people to backyard breeders and pet stores. clm[/QUOTE]

My first post on this Forum was gonna be about "getting my cat to behave when I brush her", but something came up...


There is possibly something quite disturbing going on in this area of the Foothills and it is just beginning to break.
Has anyone ever heard of such a thing as a [I]strip mall puppymill[/I]?
I thought all the puppymills were way out in the boonies and took months and months to get any attention to bust them. Our town is going to closly follow this story. Maybe , if you happen to know anyone who may have been involved somehow with this operation or any of the "mills" mentioned in the victims letter, please feel free to help out.
I hope posting this "other" forum address isn't breaking any rules here. I couldn't find one if there is. I just thought this was so important to get out there to the right community.
Thanks ,
cali

calicogal March 14th, 2007 04:29 PM

sorry all
 
[QUOTE=calicogal;389460]My first post on this Forum was gonna be about "getting my cat to behave when I brush her", but something came up...


There is possibly something quite disturbing going on in this area of the Foothills and it is just beginning to break.
Has anyone ever heard of such a thing as a [I]strip mall puppymill[/I]?
I thought all the puppymills were way out in the boonies and took months and months to get any attention to bust them. Our town is going to closly follow this story. Maybe , if you happen to know anyone who may have been involved somehow with this operation or any of the "mills" mentioned in the victims letter, please feel free to help out.
I hope posting this "other" forum address isn't breaking any rules here. I couldn't find one if there is. I just thought this was so important to get out there to the right community.
Thanks ,
cali[/QUOTE]


[CENTER]Hello All ,

Sorry about the problem with the link.
I was going with the fact that our admin. has
let it ride on our community forum
but of course, 20/20 hindsight I hope even these
folks don't get into hot water
with the legal issue.
Just hope the animals are ok.
:pray:
Thanks,
cali
[/CENTER]

Prin March 14th, 2007 04:36 PM

What I've learned on this site is that even though us animal lovers have great intentions, it's the puppymills who have the money...:sad:

Regardless of which puppymill it is, all we can do is try to educate those around us, try not to exacerbate the problem by contributing to it (i.e. spay and neuter), and adopt pets so as not to encourage these unethical "breeders".

heidiho March 14th, 2007 04:49 PM

I have come to the conclusion unless you are breeding your dog for some kind of greater good in the world(seeing eye dogs,special needs for people etc) i dont see why you would breed,with all the animals that need homes in this world..

calicogal March 14th, 2007 05:02 PM

what if...
 
[QUOTE=heidiho;390472]I have come to the conclusion unless you are breeding your dog for some kind of greater good in the world(seeing eye dogs,special needs for people etc) i dont see why you would breed,with all the animals that need homes in this world..[/QUOTE]

[CENTER]Hello All,
Absolutely excellent post, [I]heidiho[/I]

What if all those breeders who have a knack for
such care of dogs went about searching out
the homeless and used their knowledge and love of
the animal to place it in a good home . Let us encourage even
the Govt.s , :usa: , :ca: , to support them. How many people
would love a gov't. job ,
with all its security , to do something that actually
helps make this world better.
:2cents:
cali[/CENTER]

Dekka May 14th, 2007 06:54 PM

[QUOTE=heidiho;390472]I have come to the conclusion unless you are breeding your dog for some kind of greater good in the world(seeing eye dogs,special needs for people etc) i dont see why you would breed,with all the animals that need homes in this world..[/QUOTE]


Without good breeders, only the puppy millers and byb would be producing dogs. Would we want the genetic heritage of the canine population in their hands?

Now yes I am a breeder, but I also foster for the JRTRO and suggest rescue constantly. I have a litter every year or two. But I wouldn't want my breed riddled with disease because the only breeders are the byb who don't believe in testing, or contracts or spaying or neutering. (I require any person who cannot keep the dog they must return it to me. And if anything goes wrong health wise (genetic) I will refund the full amount.)

Instead of targeting breeders how about educating the public and closing puppy mills? How many of the 'extra' dogs needing homes are from good breeders? If idiots would stop buying dogs at pet stores and from shady breeders there would be so few 'extra' animals out there needing homes.

Good breeders know we are just the caretakers of the valuable resource that is the genetic heritage of our chosen breed, and must be protected so it can be passed on for future generations of humans and dogs.

Prin May 14th, 2007 07:23 PM

[QUOTE]Instead of targeting breeders how about educating the public and closing puppy mills? How many of the 'extra' dogs needing homes are from good breeders? If idiots would stop buying dogs at pet stores and from shady breeders there would be so few 'extra' animals out there needing homes.[/QUOTE]I agree. :highfive:

Spirit May 14th, 2007 08:41 PM

[QUOTE=Prin;425603]I agree. :highfive:[/QUOTE]

Yep! :highfive:

Prin May 26th, 2007 10:30 AM

Wow. :eek:

erykah1310 May 26th, 2007 10:32 AM

I agree with Prin there!:eek:

Frenchy May 26th, 2007 11:03 AM

Is it me or are we getting more and more BYB here ? :confused:

erykah1310 May 26th, 2007 11:10 AM

BYB seems to be the way to go:frustrated:
Im way too touchy on the subject so im not going to say much, cause I have mentally linked the reputable breeders as feeding the BYB's.
But in the end, its people who keep it going, the ones looking for a pup and not being able to wait.

technodoll May 26th, 2007 12:01 PM

oooooooooo. just... ooooooooooo! :eek: :frustrated:

Dean55 October 11th, 2007 10:32 AM

From research,experience, and MHO , a list of what makes for a reputable and ethical breeder varies accordingly to each individual and circumstance and certain absolutes in lists are debatable. Here are some examples.

1. A reputable and ethical breeder need not be concerned with the medium in which they advertise as it is all about the screening process of anyone interested that may be judged a responsible owner which includes the details in the contract to cover all important aspects of the dogs ownership and care. Who is to say that responsible people do not read,listen,or view a particular medium and should be excluded from consideration. So to say that a reputable/ethical breeder does not advertise in xxxxx would not be on my list .

2. I do not agree with the suggestion that a responsible/ethical breeder "needs" or is "required" to have a waiting list or *buyers/homes* lined up before choosing to initiate a quality breeding. I can think of a number of examples for this reasoning as not all responsible/ethical breeders have the same goals in a quality breeding program and utimately the responsible/ethical breeder has considered all of the aspects in how to properly care for,manage,socialize,and train regardless of how long the dogs remain with the breeder. Some breeders have very focused and strict critera on whom they will approve to acquire thier dog/s and the window of opportunity for a quality/desired breeding can often be rather a relatively quick decision. For example in some cases as in herding breeds bred for actual work/performance goals a responsible/ethical breeder may need to keep the dogs for a indefinite period of time to observe which dogs they want to retain.

3. On the subject of ethical breeding or breeding with a emphasis of improving the breed this is a hot political topic and is higly charged with contrasting opinions in the dog world (varies from breed type and purpose for breeding) that makes for lots of unfriendly interactions amongst the humans.. For example a responsible/ethical breeder of working/herding dogs who strive to maintain and improve the breed by a wide range of average and perferably above average screening critera to include parents and grandparents performance and health history feel that certain breeds are *******ized by breeders who do not consider working ability/temperment/biddability (health always top consideration) primarily over all else.
For example responsible/ethical breeders of working Border Collies find it unexceptable that someone would even consider breeding a Border collie without understanding the concept of maintaining or better yet improving the herding aspects of the breed and would not classify or consider such breeders as responsible or ethical guardians of the breed.

4. Belonging to a particular registery or organization does not in itself indicate that a particular breeder is either a responsible or especially a ethical one. I can think of dozens of examples to illuistrate this opinion and anyone familiar with such organizations or registries would have little problem in understanding my thoughts on this point.

5. I also am of a different opinion on what critera goes into a "HEALTH GUARANTEE" as thier are in reality only a few things that can be "GUARENTEED" when it comes to health and genectic issues. Warrenties are of course anything one chooses to come up with and to say that to be a responsible/ethical one breeder must provide a specific warrenty for a specific amount of time (or a one size fits all approach) is in my opinion questionable,debatable,and unrealistic as critera varies according to circumstances.
Here is a example of a varied approach on the subject of health guarentees by a breeder.

6. Not all people who acquire dogs from responsible/ethical breeders (even those under strict contractual agreement) or any other source to include rescues and shelters are or turn out to be responsible/ethical people and thier simply are no guarantees in this matter except in one doing as much as reasonably possible in the screening process (everyone has different critera) when turning over a dog to another person/s care.


7. Responsible/ethical* breeders who ultilize sound health screening and other critera to include in-depth screening of potential owners are not the problem to negative dog condition...ir-responsible owners and ir-responsible breeders are the heart of the problem . A responsible/ethical breeder in my opinion will have a contractual agreement to take backany dog that they breed and should the owner allow for such dog to end up in dire consequences it is not reasonably the responsible breeders fault.


8. In my opinion the assertion that ALL responsible/ethical breeders will/must participate in rescue is unreasonable and in no way negates that person in being classified or considered as a non responsible/ethical breeder. As a breeder and one who has been involved heavily in rescue for 20 years I can think of dozens of examples to illustrate this point...


I have about 20 others points of comment on my opinion as to what constitutes a responsible/ethical breeder which I will add later as I am late for work:lightbulb::2cents:


cheers

Dean55 October 11th, 2007 11:52 AM

On the issue of breeders dogs being outlandish or un-reasonably high priced maybe one can find other sources of examples such as this one that attempts to break down what goes into a breeding/program .:shrug:



cheers

jillfarm October 11th, 2007 12:31 PM

Spaying/neutering Too Young Linked To Cancer.
 
One point I have not heard mentioned here is the fact that spaying or neutering too young has been linked to higher levels of cancer in older dogs. If you read the CKC magazine, Dogs in Canada you will have read just such an article. I have looked for the article but cannot find it right now. Anyone else know which issue it is?

scott9710 January 22nd, 2008 02:42 AM

[QUOTE=Beaglemom;256880]Reputable breeders sell their puppies on nonbreeding contracts with a clause that states that the only way that can be lifted is when the dog attains his/her championship title and then only with the breeders' permission is the dog allowed for breeding. Many times, even if you intend on showing your dog, the breeder puts the nonbreeding clause in, not always does it mean that you must spay/neuter. There are breeders who do demand spay/neuter proof on all dogs sold as pets only and/or that are not intended to be shown. I know of someone that had to provide proof, according to her contract, that her puppy has been spayed prior to her 6th month. The puppy has already been spayed and the breeder has a copy of the certificate from the veterinarian. This breeder has checked up on her puppy to make sure all is well.[/QUOTE]

beaglemom if there are breeders that demand Neuter/spaying than why didnít the breeder have it done before selling the pups? You also mention reputable breeders contracts or lifting limited registration for breeding if the dog attains a championship, if they were to give full registration what is to stop the new owner from giving full registration to their dog litters to buyers? Even so call reputable breeders are not what they seem to be, because nobody and I mean nobody will work hard and not make a profit at what they are doing, even charities make money! It is a fact of life they only get people to donate their time but somebody is profiting on the backend, even with a charity there are administrative cost. There are numerous reason people put limit registration on their ACK dogs, one of the most used tactics is they sell there puppyís for less than the market value to make the sell, then the buyer doesnít realized the box limited is checked then finds out later they need to pay more for full registration if they want to breed their dog, or think the AKC will settle the dispute later for them which wont happen. Some breeders will even sign a contract stating the puppy is AKC registered to the buyer keeping it all legal telling them they havenít received the papers yet and when registration papers show up in the mail to the unsuspecting buyer it is marked limited. People before you buy an AKC dog go to their site they have everything you need to know including why breeders have is limited registration and not all the reason are ethical! It is a matter of buyer beware!

Beaglemom I agree with your post, there are some good breeders out there that want to keep the integrity of their dogs, but they are not losing money doing it. Also I would like to add as a fairly new breeder, it is upsetting to see people creating so called designer dogs!

mastifflover January 22nd, 2008 09:02 AM

First off designer dogs are just mutts that stupid people pay way too much money for when they could easily go to a rescue or shelter and save a life and pay way less for a designer dog. Also something that I think is important is that reputable breeders are involved in rescue of the breed as well. I did buy a pet quality pup from a breeder and they were upfront about registration and I did sign an agreement to spay her before 6 months. I have found this to be common practice among breeders. And if I was ever to get rid of the dog it was to be returned to them even my pet quality pup. Who was perfect to me. But no more breeders for me only rescue babies

Reality April 7th, 2008 08:29 AM

So " I Have to Many " states when they got their dog they did not intend to breed her. I"m guessing it was a pure breed dog from a breeder,, where was the contract she had to sign when she got her dog? Why was her dog not spayed before 6 months. She makes sure people sign a contract for her puppies. I don't get it.. How does a breeder get started when the breeders insist that they are the only ones producing this breed. I disagree with puppy mills, but you are going to have a hard time convincing me of all these,, purest idea's that they breed only to make the breed better. Good money to be made at it. Helps cover the cost of their hobby ,, ( showing or helping to pay the coverage of the cost of their pets.) Heck, I have a mutt,, she's wonderful,, and I"m not paying 500 for a papers for a dog that I've promised not to breed( although I do that anyways).. So why am I paying so much for a pet I want to have,, JUST for a family pet? They really worried about how much love it's getting or protecting their business?

prodgirl July 24th, 2008 01:34 PM

BYB... another option
 
I must be honest. I am looking for a Boston Terrier. My boyfriend has never owned a dog, so he is reluctant to get a rescue. I agree that puppy mills are the worst. I won;t even buy from a pet store, just in case.

But a CKC breeder can;t be the only solution either. In Quebec, there is only 1 CKC registered breeder here tat won;t have any litters available for about a year!

I don't want a show dog. I don't want to sign a contract. I don't want to pay 1500$ for a dog either. I understand the issues with byb, but for many people that would be the only solution.

That said, it would be nice if there was a network of backyard breeders who had good dogs raised in a beneficial social environment. I would rather go find a dog on a site like that. Alas, that isn't really an option.

Frenchy July 24th, 2008 02:14 PM

And what's wrong with a rescue dog ?????

prodgirl July 24th, 2008 03:36 PM

Some rescue dogs can be more difficult, especially if they come from a place that treated them badly and abused them.

Some rescue dogs are the sweetest creatures you could ever hope to meet. Some are not. I suppose you can say that about breeder's dogs too, but the ratio for difficult dogs is higher in a rescue.

If I get a dog from a great home that socialized them and bred 2 good dogs, they will probably be less of a risk for a dog that needs more knowledge from his/her new owner.

With someone new to dogs, a dog that needs more attention and patience is maybe not the way to go. I don't know how to deal with a dog that has more anxiety, or a health issue. But I will learn a lot from having this dog and my next dog will probably be from a rescue shelter as I will be more able to handle its unique needs.

luckypenny July 24th, 2008 04:03 PM

There are such Rescues where dogs are placed in foster homes, rather than in a shelter environment, where they can be assessed and trained appropriately. A dog coming from this sort of environment may be better suited to your needs. I have to add, many are pure breed puppies. I've had two in just the past several months.

You might want to call several Rescues in your area to familiarize yourself with the work they do. You may be awfully surprised with what you find. If you're in Quebec, many of us here can recommend some awesome Rescues.

prodgirl July 24th, 2008 04:26 PM

Indeed, many are excellent. I have a friend who is in the process right now. It just so happens we have found a sweet puppy right here in Montreal. she was raised at home with the family and their 2 kids. I am going to go and meet her tonight.

Some of my favorite dogs have been rescue, and I look forward to going to the shelters to get one as our next dog (hopefully as a companion to this dog) as soon as we are ready.

Some of my least favorite dogs have been pure bred. I do understand that it does not mean a perfect dog. But I think we may have found the dog for us.

lala24 November 23rd, 2008 02:26 AM

great info.. this is the kind of stuff I was looking for... :)

mastifflover November 26th, 2008 03:07 PM

Rescues are the best dogs. Yes they may have some issues but they are worth every bit of effort. They truly appreciate the good things in life, and will thank you daily for saving them.

Mewhoelse November 5th, 2010 04:05 PM

I know this is an OLD thread, but I did want to throw something in the ring.
lperms - I list my litters on Kijiji.ca and have met the most wonderful people on that site. I too have had waiting lists, up to 2 years because I breed every two years - this thing about "only have up to 2 litters a year, or they are in it for the money" well, guess what breeders are selling their pups for a reason - not giving them away! Most REPUTABLE BREEDERS are absolutely a business enterprise and don't let anyone tell you anything different!! There is a lot of money in the dog show world, just like the horse world and Cattle world, and anyone who is reproducing is doing it to get paid - not to spread the joy for free.
People who look down their noses at where people advertise their litters for heaven's sake really need to move on in life. Yes, in a perfect world there would be long long lists of prequalified people who are suspended in animation until your dog has her pups and the dog has everything that everyone on the list wanted (ie. sex and colour), but sometimes life does happen out there, and sometimes the dogs don't have the pup that they wanted and sometimes people put their names and small deposits on more than one list. That happens alot!! So, you do need to fill in the blanks, and local papers or an online ad is not a great big huge sin against animals. Like I said, I have gotten the best people off my listings and I wouldn't trade one of them!!! You have to be careful screening anyone who responds, no matter where you found them. Breeders have to be just as careful of the new families as the family has to be of the breeder, and natural instinct does tell a breeder if they are who they say they are, and you have to put the pups with the right family for his or her personality. And sometimes that means saying no to a lot of inquiries and keeping the pup until the perfect person comes along. That's a reputable breeder trait too.

pick April 7th, 2011 08:25 AM

Do you know what's the diference between a breeder and a "creator" dogs?

When talking with a breeder about their puppies, there are some signs that can alert you. ESCAPE TO A SEVEN FEET:

The "creator" has no knowledge about the race that creates;
If you ignore or deny the existence of genetic diseases in this race, "No, my dogs have hip dysplasia!" ;
If not let you visit the kennels and see the puppies and adults;
If animals have not LOP (but are pure !!");
If dogs are not socialized;
The "breeder" is willing to let out the dog under 8 weeks;
The "creator" creates several races;
The "creator" is not interested in knowing your lifestyle or what conditions the animal has to offer, do not you put questions;

AN ETHICAL BREEDER:

Do not put dogs in stores or on Web sites advertising all races (and some of whom nobody ever heard of);
"Choose" the buyer of his dogs and the dog will not sell if you believe that the dog will not be in good hands. Soon demand meet and ask questions to the buyer;
Do not allow your dogs going to new homes with less than 8 weeks old;
The puppies come with first vaccination, dewormed and possibly already chipped;
Creates one or two races just for the love of it and improve it and get good copies. There is another reason to make creation of purebred dogs.
Makes tests to their breeding lines of trying to eliminate genetic diseases common in the breed cause;
It makes a lot of litters, as opposed plans to make few and each of them;
Attempts to educate potential owners for the good and bad of the breed they have;
Is available to advise and guide the new owner;
It is available to re-accommodate any dog ​​of their offspring if the owners were not able to keep;
Plays only examples of good temper;
Does not depend on keeping dogs for a living, have other sources of income.

While the terrible creator (forgive me, I haven't take atention when I was translating)

Creates with a purpose: to sell;
It does not seek to choose the houses where the dogs go, the first to pay is served;
It has multiple broods;
Plays both young and old dogs too, not selected, it crosses what is usually bad copies of both temperament and conformation to the breed standard;
Do not do any testing with genetic diseases;
Sell ​​animals without LOP, so without any guarantee of lineage.
OuvirLer foneticamente

HappyJacks January 17th, 2013 03:10 PM

Great list and discussion, to which I would just like to add a couple of things.

When it boils right down to it for me, as to what separates a reputable breeder vs. everyone else (whether mill, BYB, or registered breeder who passes on pedigree papers but "on paper" only) is responsibility; responsibility not only when it comes to the betterment of the breed and all that that means, but also responsibility when it comes to each and all of the pups and kitties ("charges") that they breed, I agree, and to which I'll add that the Club to which they belong is itself responsible, meaning: the Club itself has and/or is connected to a separate rescue "wing", an independent non-profit, being dedicated to finding and placing animal members of the particular breed for which it speaks, and educating the public when it comes to the good, the bad and everything in between as it pertains to that particular breed as well.

Such eductation would include (and always) the general need to spay/neuter and thus further hammering home the (contractual) need for same, and which responsible breeders and responsible buyers agree upon in their contract in first place (and actually follow through on same). In turn, coming full circle so as to provide a true network of support for all concerned, including: individual breeders themselves so as to have among other things assistance in the event one (or more) of their charges are returned for whatever reason by the owner(s) due to a change in circumstances such as illness or death of the owner, divorce or whatever the case during the life of the animal, as well as support in terms of ongoing education and so forth when it comes to training and other advice (including resources and referrals) as may be helpful to buyers and interested members of the public as well; this, so as to maybe actually help owners keep and enjoy the companionship of their pet for-life, instead of relinquishng same (where circumstances warrant, sometimes pets are far, far better off being relinquished and placed in a new home, if you catch my meaning, but hardly is this true in all cases, or at all).

As to getting a young pup or kitten spayed or neutered, this is controversial, and it is best the animal not be spayed/neutered when it is too young and still growing, arguably needing its hormones, etc. in tact for proper growth and development. Yes, shelters and some rescues insist upon early spay/neuter to "guarantee" that it's done, saying that the benefit (reducing pet over-population) outweights the risk (health and growth of the animal, etc.), but not something I personally support or believe in (unless and until there is conclusive evidence that early spay/neuter results in no harm, as in none, which simply is not yet the case, and why it's controversial). Rather, responsible breeders and rescues will (or should) insist upon a deposit, which varies but typically around $200, which is refunded to the buyer/adopter on proof by means of a vet certification of spay/neuter when the animal has come of age (around 6 months of age, give or take depending on the breed and its actual development needs), it also being a good idea for breeders/rescues to send out to the buyer/adopter "helpful reminders" and further follow-up on as well.

Finally, as to rescued animals, the vast majority of which have been relinquished (dumped) by no fault of their own, and are great pets. The chief reason why so many great adoptable pets wind up in rescue is because a buyer (some human) didn't bother to do any research on the breed in which they were interested prior to purchasing same, and the concept of picking up a phone and hiring a trainer or other such assistance is foreign to them and/or, and quite simply, didn't bother to spay/neuter! Luckily, there are reputable rescues (as well as reputable clubs connected with a rescue arm if you will, thus responsible breeders in turn), as well as responsible members of the public. Many people actually are quite happy to avoid the "crazy" puppy/kitten phase altogether, and also find rescue/adoption of a perfectly adoptable pet animal from a responsible shelter or rescue to be incredibly rewarding all-around as well (and please note: responsible shelters and rescues only place adoptable pets, and only then in deserving homes ;) .

Then, if everyone in the whole and entire chain was responsible, I will actually risk going out on a limb here to say we wouldn't have a pet over-population problem in turn, and in such a world pedigree papers would mean all that they should and then some. What a great world would that be, I agree, and a great list to help us all get there all-around as well!

Cheers

WhitegateKennel April 15th, 2021 10:07 PM

Also, a good breeder has to start sometime. There's no immaculate conception there, they start out small and have to advertise to just get their name out there. Advertising is not a sin and many breeders do have wait lists and still advertise.


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