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Has anyone ever heard of this barbaric service?

lezzpezz
November 27th, 2004, 11:23 AM
My husband works with a lady who has a dog that can only have it's nails trimmed if it is sedated. This has been the opinion of several vets that she has been to. She has been hesitant to sedate her pet for this, so sought out other methods of preparing the dog for nail trimming visits to the vet. I had suggested to my housband to tell her about Clomacalm which the dog would have to be on for a while for it to "kick in", or even Rescue Remedy, but she is going away to Australia for several months and did not want to leave her parents the responsibility of trying to get the dog's nails trimmed without incident, while she is away.

My husband just informed me that she took the dog in to have it's nails permanently "cauterized"! and that this should last 4 years or so. The dog is 3 years old and in full foot bandages after this procedure, which involved 2 vets and cost her $300!!!! She said she had no other choice as she did not want to stress the dog or her parents or veterinary staff.

Is this procedure what I think it is? Does this mean she had the dogs nails clipped so short that it would take 4 years for them to grow back?? Is this akin to declawing an adult dog? Does this bother anyone else out there, especially those in the veterinarian field? It sounds very cruel to me. :confused:

Lucky Rescue
November 27th, 2004, 12:28 PM
Haven't these vets heard of a muzzle?

Cauterizing means melting the nail away and cauterizing the blood vessel at the same time. It's sometimes done in place of nail clipping

I just don't know how this would stop the nail from regrowing at a normal rate. Did they burn the nail away right to the nail bed?.... :confused:

It sounds horrible, if this poor dog needed bandages - a muzzle is much kinder.

Karin
November 27th, 2004, 06:49 PM
I know many vets that will tourniquet a dogs legs, (under anesthesia) and cut each nail way past the quick. I have seen too many infected nails and paws too. This is done at the owners request. Usually the owners are too lazy to try a nail trim or to bring the dog in to have the trim done on a regular basis. One lady I know has her Rotti, Abigail, quicked every 3 months, Abigail is a star agility dog that has been featured on Animal Planet many times....this is all done for show. I have always felt so bad for Abby! She was once on Zeniquin for a whole month because her nails & nail beds were so infected. She never even whimpers.....breaks my heart.

louie's mum
November 27th, 2004, 07:30 PM
excuse me ... but jesus
anyone who's ever even torn a fingernail involving the quick knows it can, and usually does throb incessistently with pain.
i cannot even begin to imagine an animal who has to WALK on these paws ... barbaric is right.

TobsterMom
November 27th, 2004, 07:46 PM
This is sad. Most of the time it's the owners that are more stressed about nail care than the animal.

I get at least 3 calls per shift from clients wanting cats declawed.

I don't understand. When will people stop having the desire to mutilate their pets????

louie's mum
November 27th, 2004, 08:10 PM
This is sad. Most of the time it's the owners that are more stressed about nail care than the animal.

I get at least 3 calls per shift from clients wanting cats declawed.

I don't understand. When will people stop having the desire to mutilate their pets????

when they understand what the procedure is. as i mentioned before i had no idea how this was done ... don't think i even thought about it. as soon as i was educated to EXACTLY what is done i decided i would NEVER again put any animal thru this.
not sure how this can happen unless someone is searching for info before the operation and people like those found here continue to take every opportunity to let people know how it's done.
if only vets would hand out a fact sheet when people want this done. just the facts, and then let the conscience be the guide. wouldn't save every animal from this pain but it would surely help. :sad: :sad: :sad:

TobsterMom
November 27th, 2004, 08:15 PM
Our vet won't do declawing. We tell everyone who calls exactly why. For some reason, people don't know it's cruel and painful. :(

Lucky Rescue
November 27th, 2004, 08:43 PM
I know many vets that will tourniquet a dogs legs, (under anesthesia) and cut each nail way past the quick. I have seen too many infected nails and paws too. This is done at the owners request. Usually the owners are too lazy to try a nail trim or to bring the dog in to have the trim done on a regular basis. One lady I know has her Rotti, Abigail, quicked every 3 months, Abigail is a star agility dog that has been featured on Animal Planet many times....this is all done for show. I have always felt so bad for Abby! She was once on Zeniquin for a whole month because her nails & nail beds were so infected. She never even whimpers.....breaks my heart.

What kind of vet would deliberately inflict pain on an animal?? I thought their credo was "First do no harm." :eek: :mad:

This makes me literally ill. I am a nervous wreck when it comes to clipping my dog's nails since I once accidentally quicked her. Now I just clip off the little hook at the end. Why do dogs need super short nails anyway? To save the hardwood floors or for showing? Not good enough reasons to justify this kind of abuse.

Karin
November 27th, 2004, 09:14 PM
It happens everywhere LR. Most vets will do it also.

Abigail is a client of my former vet/employer..

Ciara's new vet does do feline declaws & puppy tails & dewclaws but she will not do quick nails unless there is a split or tear that needs emergency care.

Like I said, most vet's will do this procedure. Takes only about 10 minutes once the dog is under and most of the time the tech's are doing it.

The cost runs around $90 dollars.

To trim Ciara's nails..it takes me 2 days. I have to do it in stages and with alot of bribery.

twinmommy
November 27th, 2004, 09:17 PM
I always thought that you would just simply cut the "hooks" off now and again, and that if the dog gets regular excercise....the pavement keeps them short enough. Our animals love us, despite our facial flaws, long nails, pimples,razor stubble, crooked teeth...etc etc etc.

this just sickens me :mad:

Karin
November 27th, 2004, 09:23 PM
Btw. I thought their credo was the "Caring Profession".

I could be wrong..( about the saying)

I live in a very vet populated area and I know most of them. I am not one to argue with a practice because most do great work. I can only argue with the few who do not.

One attitude among some of these vets is "If I do not do it, they will find someone who will." ..That is very true too, we have seen the aftermath of those "someone elses.''. It's not pretty.

So credit where credit is due.

twinmommy
November 27th, 2004, 09:29 PM
too bad they seem to have lost some integrity on the road to success.....I understand that things are sometimes worse off "elsewhere" , but why not educate the client? Shouldn't that be part of caring?

sedwick
November 28th, 2004, 10:57 AM
This is a Great Example of Laziness... to clip a dog's nail is just like teaching your dog to heal, it takes TRAINING!!! There is no excuse for not training your dog to have it's nail's clipped without sedation!!! Being a pet owner comes with responsibilities. Even if you adopt a dog at an older age, they can be trained. I diapprove of sedation and the surgery!

SSAC
November 28th, 2004, 01:00 PM
The vets that I work for only declaw, they don't like to, but they want to make sure that it's done properly. They would never do any of these other things. (that's why I work for them). If owners request such things, we advise them to try other clinics :D

moontamara
November 29th, 2004, 10:28 AM
I cut Casey's quick not once, but twice in a very short period of time and haven't been able to make myself do them again. He also needs the hair cut around his feet because he's slipping on our floors. I'm planning to get his feet, including claws, taken care of professionally, although this thread has me a little freaked about doing that too, lest there be communication problems with the Korean groomer!!!!

I want to cut just a little at a time like Lucky Rescue and just do them more often -- but last time I tried that with one of the back paws (just the tip -- seriously) and he bled again. Casey's feet are the only remaining problem we have these days. :(

After I do get them done professionally (and humanely) how often should I clip them? Does just the tips once a week sound about right?

mastifflover
November 29th, 2004, 10:44 AM
I think that is barbaric. You can just imagine the pain from it. About 3 weeks ago Bud and I were at the park he was running around and playing and came over and I looked down to see blood on his foot and the ground he had ripped his toenail off right down to the quick. I grabbed a bottle of water that I had washed it off and wrapped it up in my glove and took him to the vet around the corner to get the stop bleed stuff and he looked at it and put the stuff on and said he will probably favour it for a few days but keep it clean and it will grow back. He limped around for about 4 days you know how much it hurts when you rip a nail off to short imagine doing it to all your nails hands and feets I think that would be very painful. Buddys nails very rarely have to be cut he wears them down on the pavement. If the dogs nail are so hard to trim then walk him on pavement more.

VickyK
November 29th, 2004, 11:09 AM
Oh my goodness!!! O.K. When I was a student at grooming school, cutting nails freaked me out! I thought I would never be able but it just a matter of getting the hang of it. And it works both ways, I've had animals that needed to be mussled in order for me to get their nails cut and now after 3 to 5 clippings, they know what it's all about and let me go at it.

Now here are some tips; For starters most commonly used trick is to look underneath the nail. You see a "groove" underneath? well that is usually where the vein lays 99% of the time so you are safe to cut until there.

Rule #1;always cut small slices off, little at a time, that is your safest bet.

Rule #2; always cut at 90 degree angle

If the nails are black they usually have a white vein
if the nails are white they usually have a black vein

Clip small slices off until u see a dot that is the beggining of the vein.

P.S. If you cut small slices and you end up making the animal bleed its not soooo bad. trust me I am an animal lover and some dogs Ive accidently cut did not even feel it. I just "scratched" the surface and they dont always feel that. It occasinally happens to the best groomers. Now if you take a huge chunk off then that hurts!

I always talk to my animal clients in a baby voice and that always helps, and I avoid direct eye contact, I blink frequently when I look at them. You know any good groomer can cut any dogs nail. I find beagles to be the biggest challenge when it comes to nail clipping, so if you know any beagle owners maybe you should ask them where they go.

Lucky Rescue
November 29th, 2004, 11:30 AM
If you cut small slices and you end up making the animal bleed its not soooo bad.

I believe you, but the way my dog yelps, cries and carries on is too stressful for ME! :D She gets all submissive as though she is saying "Why do you hurt me when I love you so??" ...sigh....

I have my dog trained to know when it's nail cutting time. Always the same place (my bed :rolleyes: ) and always with a handful of special treats she gets only for nail cutting.

After I clip each nail, I give her a treat and praise her as though she has won gold in the Olympics.

She still doesn't like it, but tolerates it for the treats.

VickyK
November 29th, 2004, 11:40 AM
Did anyone see America's funniest home videos last night, there was a clip of a toddler having a temper tantrum, but only when mom was around. Once she would leave the room, the crying would stop. The toddler would then search for him mom, and once she was in sight, he would throw himself to the floor and continue his tantrum; crying and screamed as if he was dying of pain and unable to move, but once again, once she was out of sight, he would abruptly stop crying, lift himself up with no problem and walk until he found his mom and then freaked out again :) Dogs in a way are the same way, they know if I whimper and give mommy the wide-eyed victim look she will feel sorry for him even if its for their own good. Have you guys ever seen an animal who's nail grew so long that they actually curved under the paw and sometimes even stabs into the cushion....now that hurts and I find is much more cruel that 5 minutes of nervousness.

Karin
November 29th, 2004, 07:19 PM
I believe you, but the way my dog yelps, cries and carries on is too stressful for ME! :D She gets all submissive as though she is saying "Why do you hurt me when I love you so??" ...sigh....

I have my dog trained to know when it's nail cutting time. Always the same place (my bed :rolleyes: ) and always with a handful of special treats she gets only for nail cutting.

After I clip each nail, I give her a treat and praise her as though she has won gold in the Olympics.

She still doesn't like it, but tolerates it for the treats.


LMAO!

I have trimmed nails for over 25 years now, no problem...(except the ****er which left a pooplog in my scrub pocket, to be found later in the washer)

Ciara knows how to push my buttons, you would think I was amputating the entire paw! I do the treat thing, also cheese..(her favorite), much praise...and it is still dreaded encounter, she would rather have her anal glands done (butt squeeze). It literally takes me two days. Back paws, the last. When I worked for the evil vet, her new hire/friend/my replacement...cut Ciara's nails, quicked every one almost like we did with Abigail, only no anesthesea was used. I was sent out on the lunch run and had asked the doc for a nail trim sometime before quiting time...she thought she would let her tech & friend practice on Ciara while I was gone knowing Ciara was an easy goof. (And also knowing I would not allow it)
This is why Ciara is so hard to n/t. I do not blame her. I may complain but I do not mind taking the time and grief do it.Animals can suffer from post traumatic stress too.

Sorry this was so long....*stepping off of the soapbox*

glasslass
November 29th, 2004, 07:37 PM
I don't trim Den-Den's nails. I'm afraid he won't trust me if I ever hurt him and I need to be be able to trim his paws and around his pads. He's extremely good while the vet does it. It only takes a couple minutes and is well worth the $15. If he's getting a vaccination or we have any other reason to be at the vets, they don't even charge the $15. When I'm just holding him in my arms and cuddling him, I massage around his toes so that he's used to his feet being handled and likes it.

Karin
November 29th, 2004, 07:53 PM
LMAO!

I have trimmed nails for over 25 years now, no problem...(except the ****er which left a pooplog in my scrub pocket, to be found later in the washer)

Ciara knows how to push my buttons, you would think I was amputating the entire paw! I do the treat thing, also cheese..(her favorite), much praise...and it is still dreaded encounter, she would rather have her anal glands done (butt squeeze). It literally takes me two days. Back paws, the last. When I worked for the evil vet, her new hire/friend/my replacement...cut Ciara's nails, quicked every one almost like we did with Abigail, only no anesthesea was used. I was sent out on the lunch run and had asked the doc for a nail trim sometime before quiting time...she thought she would let her tech & friend practice on Ciara while I was gone knowing Ciara was an easy goof. (And also knowing I would not allow it)
This is why Ciara is so hard to n/t. I do not blame her. I may complain but I do not mind taking the time and grief do it.Animals can suffer from post traumatic stress too.

Sorry this was so long....*stepping off of the soapbox*


Prime example of sensorship taken to extreme. What is wrong with the breed name "****er spaniel"??