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Looking for a trap --- sounds terrible!!

Dwight Byrd
November 26th, 2004, 07:56 PM
Hi Folks,

I know that this sounds terrible, but I am looking as purchasing a trap so that I can humanely trap some of the wild cats that live right in my driveway. These are wild cats and kittens and there has been a serious problem that has been developing for some time. :(

Two questions: If I trap these poor things and take them to the Humane Society, is there any hope for them? Are they adoptable?

Where could I purchase a trap that I could catch them in ? Should I even attempts such a thing? I am so worried about these poor things with winter coming. Last year there were a few cold little things shivering in the driveway. They are so wild though, you can't get close to them. :confused:

Over the last few years, many neighbours have been feeding these wild cats, and the populationis growing. Nobody seems to want to take them in, if that was even possible. I am sure that they feel that they are helping, but I am not so sure.

I have a cat that I adopted 15 years ago, and a rescue dog from last April. Taking another pet into the family is just not an option right now.

Any ideas or feedback folks?

Thanks.

Lucky Rescue
November 26th, 2004, 08:09 PM
If I trap these poor things and take them to the Humane Society, is there any hope for them? Are they adoptable?

No there is no hope for them at the shelter and they will be killed.

Here's your options:

1 -Trap them and tame them and adopt them out.

2 -Trap them, have them spayed and neutered, and release them in the same place IF there is shelter for them - adequate, warm shelter.

3 -Trap them and take them to the vet to be humanely euthanized. At least they won't have the terror of the shelter.

The people feeding these cats are hurting them and not helping if they aren't spayed or neutered. Death at the vet is not nearly the worst that can happen to these poor cats. Death by freezing, poisoning, fights, dog/wild animal attacks, disease, infection etc etc is much much worse. The suffering of females giving birth outside in January is unimaginable.

If you choose option no.2 - there's lots of plans for building a feral cat shelter on the net. I also have plans for these shelters.

You can buy the traps at Canadian Tire sometimes, or you can rent them at rent-all centers. They usually give a substantial discount if you take the trap for 3 days or more.

Any of the options I gave you is preferable to the fate that awaits these (and all feral cats) if no one does anything.

CyberKitten
November 26th, 2004, 08:10 PM
The best thing your neighbourhood can do is to somehow trap these kitties and then have them neutered. If you bring them to the SPCA or Humane Society, their lifespan will be severely shortened; they could be put to sleep in a matter of hours!! If you bring them kittens, someone MAY take the time to socialize them but there are so many cats looking for new homes that it is unlikely.

This is one of the traps used by various feral cat coaltions:

http://www.livetrap.com/

I did not see where you live but is there a feral cat organization near there? They trap cats, neuter them and help keep the colony together. Killing these poor kitties will not solve the problem.

Here are some examples of feral cat organiations:

http://www.feralcat.com/traps.html
http://www.alleycat.org/
http://amby.com/cat_site/feral.html

Maybe your neighbourhood could follow the examples of others and build some kind of enclosure for them so they would be safely out of harm's way and warm in the winter. People could take turns feeding them and once neutered, the colony would not grow in size.

You could try to adopt out kittens and some of the more socialized ones. Most ferals began life in a comfortable home and you mat be able to find homes for some of them. But do NOT take them to the humane society unless you want them killed.

Good luck!

Karin
November 26th, 2004, 09:08 PM
Hi Folks,

I know that this sounds terrible, but I am looking as purchasing a trap so that I can humanely trap some of the wild cats that live right in my driveway. These are wild cats and kittens and there has been a serious problem that has been developing for some time. :(

Two questions: If I trap these poor things and take them to the Humane Society, is there any hope for them? Are they adoptable?

Where could I purchase a trap that I could catch them in ? Should I even attempts such a thing? I am so worried about these poor things with winter coming. Last year there were a few cold little things shivering in the driveway. They are so wild though, you can't get close to them. :confused:

Over the last few years, many neighbours have been feeding these wild cats, and the populationis growing. Nobody seems to want to take them in, if that was even possible. I am sure that they feel that they are helping, but I am not so sure.

I have a cat that I adopted 15 years ago, and a rescue dog from last April. Taking another pet into the family is just not an option right now.

Any ideas or feedback folks?

Thanks.


I may have missed some info here like your location...but where I live ( and surrounding countys) we have "Operation Catnip". This is for stray or feral cats.. you trap and the University Of Floridas Vet college spays/neuters, tests/ vaccinates and micro chips all cats brought to them. All cats must be released back where they came from.
Florida has a serious feral cat problem. Disease is spread this way. The only hope is control.

Some of my state's larger cities have opted for eradication.

Dwight Byrd
November 27th, 2004, 09:29 AM
Hi,

I am from Scarborough, and hope to be able to somehow help out with this problem. These poor cats are just all over the place. When I came home from work yesterday, I was informed that two little new kittens were seen in the bushes in front of the house next door. The cycle continues. I remember last year feeling so bad to see little kittens shivering in the driveway, huddled in a little spot where there was no snow. It was heart breaking. Some of them did survive, and are now really big, and I suspect have given birth themselves to yet more offspring.

I was not aware that if I caught these poor things and took them to the humane society, that they would be put down. I suspect that the same would be true for Animal Rescue in Scarborough. (SPCA). Trying to catch them all and paying to have them neutered or spayed, well, that is a little out of my reach. It is so sad that we live in a society where animals are so disposable, not cared for and loved.

As I sit here, typing this note, my own little Cadeau is sitting on my desk, snoozing away. I got her from the Humane Society almost 15 years ago and love her so much. I could never give her, all that she has given me though.
And my Buddy, (golden rescue) who was so thin and sad when I got him (and apparently was going to be put down for aggression), well now, he is a different dog, loving, loyal and sweet. All it takes it time, patience and love.

These poor little cats outside, I wish that I could help them too, but it seems like an overwhelming task .... :(

louie's mum
November 27th, 2004, 11:32 AM
From Jazzpurr (http://www.jazzpurr.org) here in windsor ... http://www.jazzpurr.org/Clinic444.htm

excerpt ....

To assist other communities who wish to implement a no-kill solution, we are posting all of our Standard Operating Procedures for our Spay/Neuter Program for Stray and Feral Cats. In developing our policies and procedures, we wish to acknowledge and thank the information and advice provided by many groups and individuals, including The Feral Cats Coalition, Alley Cat Allies, Dr. Susan Little (Bytown Hospital, Ottawa), Dr. Chuck Fuerth (Brack Animal Hospital, Windsor), Dr. Karri Beck (Doncaster Clinic, Toronto), Dr. Murray McMullen (Clearwater Animal Hospital, Windsor), the San Francisco SPCA and many others.

Dwight Byrd
November 27th, 2004, 03:48 PM
Is such a program available in Toronto? If so, I would love to look into it.

anniebananie
November 27th, 2004, 03:52 PM
If you have an animal control man in the area they maybe able to help you. I do know that farmers sometimes take wild kittens that are found, for their barns etc. This maybe an alternative. Contact your local Government office and see what they suggest.

CyberKitten
November 27th, 2004, 04:10 PM
Again, Animal Control would only kill the cats, sigh!! (and it would be great to find some forever homes for the kittens at least - the ferals would want to return to theor colony and they'd at least be neutered).

You might try these links for Toronto:

http://www.artzwild.com/cat/crisis.html
http://www.torontocatrescue.ca/store/index.asp
http://www.catstoronto.com/
http://www.annexcatrescue.on.ca/index.shtml
http://abbeycats.org/links.htm

Good luck!!!

melanie
November 27th, 2004, 04:30 PM
please dont think me horrid when you read the folowing-

over here in oz feral cats are a huge problem, they kill, maim and destroy. many a species has become extinct because of the problem, our wildlife rescues are full of little creatures that have been maimed, tourtured or half killed by feral cats, i have seen the damage they cause and it is terrifying what a cat can do to say a very rare lizard, one that may still be alive but will never be released into the bush as it would die out there with the damage, or when you see a dead blue azura kingfisher (beautiful blue kookaburra) torn to pieces in the bush, it had no chances.

do you have similar problems with ferals there? what impcat do they have on your bush? is the situation as serious as it is here??

when i read that they spay the cats and release them my heart near jumped out of my chest, but yoru situaiton may be different.

but over here the only way to deal with them is to kill them, it is fair for all parties, even the cat. the cat does not have a good life and is in great danger here, if a farmer gets it it may suffer a horrid death, i have seen ppl hunt them up trees then use long sharpened sythes to hack them to pieces slowly nad painfully, or they try and shoot tthem by tkaing 10shots and slowly wounding it then sending it off to dye slowly :evil: :mad: , so i would much rather prefer them put to sleep in a humane fashion.

(dont you love that word 'humane fashion', its so human and egotistical 'humane fashion' hah what a joke it was not humane to start the problem was it now, how can we call cleaning up our own mess humane :eek: )

but if there is no threat to native animals then i suppose they can live in happiness, if only we could have that situation here, then everyone would be safe, well fed and happy. so can you tell me what they do over there?? and how do they survive the winter in the cold, is it because they toughen up??

if there is a problem over there, i would do do a favor to the native animals and have them PTS.

ps- have you heard of Dr John Wamsley, aka the cat hat man?? he does not hate feral cats, he likes them but he works with endangered animals and sees the effects of these cats daily. so when he has had to kill them in the past, instead of just dumping them to rot, he uses the skins for hats and fabrics. i think it is a fantastic idea, i hate seeing animals go to waste, they were born for a reason and i think it is sooo disrespectful to dump their bodies, using the skin seems a show of respect for the animals existance, a sign that a life was not wasted. but now all that needs to be done is convince society of this :rolleyes: .

CyberKitten
November 27th, 2004, 04:55 PM
In most communities in North America, feral colonies are supported. There are numerous "trap and release" programs - trap them, neuter them and release them back to their colony. Some ferals are just too wild to ever adjust to life as an indoor kitty. Kittens are often adopted out by the various cat rescue groups though.

Other than the rare cantakorous and uncaring neighbour who dislikes cats, I doubt you would find many people to agree with you about cats being a problem.

In fact, there is some concern by animal welfare groups about Australia's actions as evidenced by this article:

http://cats.about.com/cs/advocacy/a/australianferal.htm

I was in Perth a few years ago at a conference and met many people who were lobbying their government to take a more reasonable view. So perhaps your government will come around in time and realize their studies are not so correct. (One can hope!)

melanie
November 27th, 2004, 05:20 PM
with a shocked look on my face i strongly disagree (i read that article and checked out the links). australia is a very isolated land, the animals here have developed over the years without any major predators, the dingo and other such as the tassy devil are the biggest and scariest our predators get, and there have certianly been no lg cat predators in our history (the quoll does not come close and its not a cat).

these animals have no deffence against the cats or foxes for that matter. the population of foxes, cats and other introduced feral pests such a rabbits are huge and them themselves dont have predators so they can grow in numbrs with no control.

jsut because the cat comes form a cute domesticated animal does not mean it cannot be a problem, like wild dogs. dont native animals hve rights to live too, just because i cnat cuddle them makes them no less special)

since white man came to this land, we have lost over 1000 species of plant and animal. our native animals have a right to protection. i have lived and worked in the bush my entire life, i have seen many horrific scenes at the claws of feral cats, i have seen the damage. i have seen the numerous cases of traumatised and mauled native animals with no hope of revovery due to feral cat attack, or no hope of survival, a small bird has no hope against a huge feral cat, and these cats are big and tough. and we have all seen the reduced numbers of natives in areas where feral cats reside, so we must take action, we cant jsut sit back and let the native die because we let ppl have pets in the first place. and there are numerous carers, aboriginal elders, farmers, animals and such taht can testify to such horror and more.

but it is not only the feral cat that is a problem, the domesticatedo ne is a hassle for natives too. that is why in some states and areas legislation is being introduced for cats, they are required in these areas to be kept inside and in a cattery, no outside at all for the protection of natives. some areas that have delicate environments such as bush world heritage areas, have even banned the ownership of cats and dog in order to protect some sensitive speices.

so it is not only the attack of the feral cat, yes we let it get a way for a while, but environmental perspectives and morals have changed alot in the past 20yrs so it was not once considered the prob it is today. and now we are tackling it, we need to save our natives, so many have been lost, and they have a right to live in their native habitat it is imperative that their place is secured or at least some effort to protect them made. their numbers are being reduced fore many reasons and this is jsuto ne of the reason that we are now facing and dealing with. we cannot let the slaughter of natives continue, we have a duty to protect them and we are now developing legislation and practice to do so.

in the past 200 yrs australia has lost so much, our land is slowly being torn apart, we must strive to protect her at all cost and keep our land alive.

tyr
November 27th, 2004, 05:40 PM
Dwight Bird -

You are so sweet for thinking of these poor babies with winter nearing! My heart goes out to you. Have you got a hold of a humane trap yet? I know that some shelters rent them out - that way you do not have to buy one...unless you want to and plan on doing more of this in the future.

I know that there is a feral rescue group here in Ottawa. If you want to do some further research on Shelters you should also try Petfinder.com. If you click on the "Shelter & Rescue Groups" link at the top of the page and put in your area, it will bring up all the shelters in your area and most often places outside your area. If you cannot find a shelter/rescue that deals solely with ferals would you be willing to commute outside of your city to bring them to another place where you would know they would be well taken care of? Just another suggestion if it is feasible.

As well, there is another message board you could join on Petfinder.com. Go to the top right hand link "Messages" and sign up there. That may be another place to get some further opinions and suggestions, if you wanted. You could have Pets.ca and Petfinder.com open at the same time. These are two great places - I am sure others here would agree.

This is just my 2cents...

Keep me posted on what is happening.

chico2
November 27th, 2004, 06:10 PM
DwightByrd,I am surprised to read this is happening in Scarborogh..
Someone here told me how our fiberals rounded up a whole feral cat colony and had them killed,it was in some park in Toronto.
I wish it would be possible to at least save the young ones and maybe have them adopted out :sad: I heard the Toronto HS is not as good as they like us to think they are,they kill cats every day...
You have a huge problem,I do not think I could handle what you see out there in the cold,absolutely heartbreaking :sad: :sad: and it will only get worse as they multiply.I know a place in New York they catch,neuter/spay and release,but know of nothing like that in Toronto.Obviously something has to be done,maybe one of the places suggested to you can help,I hope they can.Please keep us posted...