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Raw bones for Dogs?

Shaykeija
November 18th, 2004, 11:16 PM
To feed or not to feed? Some say yes to large raw bones and some say no. I have started giving Missie and Sophie large cow bones that are boiled for a few minutes. I only let them chew at them for about 15 min. A treat for after I brush their teeth. Missie is a terri poo and Sophie is a Shih Tzu. Any comments and no snippy ones I am sensitive :crazy: . Lol Just want to know what other people do. Thanks Also I supervise them so they don't crack off ony thing large. The bones look like chipmunks have been at them.

Lucky Rescue
November 19th, 2004, 12:26 AM
I highly recommend raw bones! Dogs have a need to chew, and I would let them chew as long as they like! :)

LavenderRott
November 19th, 2004, 02:14 AM
My girls love nothing more then a large raw bone! (I don't boil mine.)

Raw bones as a regular part of a dog's routine eliminates the need for brushing teeth.

Bugsy
November 19th, 2004, 02:40 AM
I've heard so much talk about raw bones... can someone answer some of my questions, please. :confused:

Are they safe raw-wise / bacteria-wise?

What about ecoli?

How long before it gets old and needs to be thrown out (doubt it'll last that
long)? But if it does... will the bone need to be refrigerated?

Also I think I read once to serve it frozen ??

Can my dogs be left alone with one?

Can my giants (100 lbs +) chew off big chunks / can they chock / what about blockage?

What specifically do I ask for at the butcher's? Beef, veal ? (body part)?



Thanx guys.... :D

LavenderRott
November 19th, 2004, 03:02 AM
What I have been told so far as bones go:

Raw bones are perfectly fine.

Dogs digestive tracts are very different fron humans. Less time in the digestive tract means fewer bacterial issues: ie. e coli, salmanella, etc.

I leave them down until the dogs lose interest in them.

Yes, they can be served frozen.

MY dogs can be left alone with them, but I don't know your dogs, so I am not sure about yours.

Yes, big chunks can cause problems.

I usually go to the butcher and get a large shank bone cut in half.

mastifflover
November 19th, 2004, 11:01 AM
I give them frozen and never boil them I dont think for the little guys boiling them would be too much of an issue but for big guys never boil them. Once they are boiled they are more likely to splinter and break off pieces. I usually throw them out after a few days because believe me when your 2 have been at them for one day there will not be much that will carry bacteria left on them, I also wash them off if Bud has a real interest in one after a couple of days. I leave him with them but usually I give them to him when I am home but he loves when I restuff the ends with rollover. He thinks he is in doggy heaven

sujean
November 19th, 2004, 11:04 AM
our local grocery store sells bones from their cuts specifically for dogs. my dog is 90 pounds and can tear into just about anything but he struggles with these shank bones. so for a smaller dog i wouldn't imagine they would be able to rip off giant chunks that would pose a choking problem (but the again, you could have a killer shih tzu...)

along with the bones and his kong, tyson has the cleanest teeth on the block! i've even asked my vet if i needed to brush his teeth in addition to his current dental plan and he says tyson has great teeth-no need for beef flavored toothpaste and mega toothbrush!

so yes yes and yes on the bone!! (but not your left overs from steak dinner!)

GsdDiamond
November 19th, 2004, 11:32 AM
We also feed Diamond raw bones (the thigh bone of the cow), which are smoked and cut into 4 chunks, so she can get at the marrow. She has the most wonderfully white teeth, as you can see by the attached image. So I say go for it! Make sure the bone is big enough and not easily shattered, and you won't have a problem.

Good luck!

jjgeonerd
November 19th, 2004, 11:37 AM
I also use the soup bones from the butcher. I boil them for 4-5 minutes to cook any residual meat on the outside and kill any bacteria that mat be present. This short boil does not cook the bone and the marrow in the center remains raw. Yes, dogs digestive tracks are shorter than humans, and although less common, they can still get Salmonella and e. coli. Personally, I don't want to risk it (e. coli is a nasty disease). I have read A LOT recommending both ways...It seems to me that it is just what you are comfortable with.

sujean
November 19th, 2004, 11:37 AM
diamond: what a great smile your pup has!!! :crazy:

GsdDiamond
November 19th, 2004, 11:42 AM
Thank you! It was the best pic to show her teeth. She was about to try and grab the camera. Silly girl!

Lassie's Mommy
November 19th, 2004, 11:49 AM
What age should a puppy be before giving a bone to. Mine is almost 11 weeks.

GsdDiamond
November 19th, 2004, 12:16 PM
I waited until her permanent teeth came in so as not to worry about her breaking a tooth from chewing too much.

Lassie's Mommy
November 19th, 2004, 12:19 PM
Thanks very much.

doggy lover
November 19th, 2004, 05:49 PM
I have used smoked bones for my dogs, Travis was 120lb and I would get him half a leg, he loved them. I tried him with raw bones but his stomach was funny and he would get the runs, not nice to come home from work too. I have frozen these bones as well, they last forever in the freezer, and last a long time out, as they are smoked. Tucker I have given one of Travis's bones I found in the bottom of my freezer, never got around to throwing it out, he loves them to. Its funny to see Tucker walking around with it in his mouth as its half the size of him.