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The Greyhound

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 07:30 AM
I saw something on tv last night about how they breed them and when they are done racing the horrible some of them get discarded,my goal is to save an animal from a shelter,but when i heard about this breed i thought this may be the perfect dog for me..Does anyone know about Greyhounds???????

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 07:51 AM
I just went to adopt a greyhound website and i must say it sounds like the perfect dog for me..........Anyone out there with any knowledge on them would be appreciated.

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 08:31 AM
first got interested in greyhounds when my husband bought a racing one. It was such fun watching the dog race and even better when he won. When we decided that it was time for him to retire we bought him home to live with us.

Many people are put of having a greyhound as a pet because they have many false impressions of them. The main one is that they need alot of exercise. This is totally untrue. Greyhounds have a surge of energy but it really doesn't last long. The average greyhound race lasts 30 seconds and that is the dogs work done for a week!! If my dog goes out for an hours walk, then he spends the rest of the day fast asleep because it has totally worn him out!!

Another impression people have about greyhounds is that they a vicious. This couldn't be further from the truth. They are one of the most docile breed of dogs around. I have two children, the eldest being three, and she bosses the poor dog around and he just sits there and ignores her! The youngest is nine months and her favourite game at the moment is trying to pulls the dog eyeball out of its socket. Once again he doesnt take any notice and doesnt even bother to move away from her. It has been said that greyhounds are one of the best dogs to have when you have small children as they are so placid.

The one thing that you do have to be careful with is food. Greyhounds love it!! Some people think that because they are such skinny dogs they dont really eat much.....WRONG!! My dog will eat and eat and then he will stil scrounge for more! The problem comes when they gradually change shape and you look at them one day and instead of being the lean racing machine that they once were, they have turned into a barrell. Being this overweight isn't good for any animal it puts such a strain on their little hearts so please be careful.

So what will a greyhound expect from you. Will they will want food, alot of love and a nice comfy sofa to lay on......so go on.... ..rehome one and you too will enjoy the love and loyalty of a good dog.


Advantages Disadvantages

Docile and full of love they do love to take over the sofa








back to product Greyhound

Lucky Rescue
November 18th, 2004, 08:44 AM
Terrible, cruel things are done to racing greyhounds who aren't fast enough, or have finished their racing days. They are shot, hung, beaten and left to starve to death. :mad:

I fostered a few racing greyhounds, and they were quiet, sweet, docile and affectionate housepets. And yes - couch potatoes. They have NO body fat and they are intolerant of high heat or extreme cold and must wear a coat.

If you want to adopt a ex-racer, try and find a rescue who has already gotten them used to things like stairs, shiny floors and other household things because the racing greyhounds have never seen these things before. They spend their lives either muzzled and caged, or on the track.

Greyhounds can be predatory to small animals and even to small dogs, since they are hunting dogs. And of course you can NEVER let them off leash unless in a safe area.

You will probably make lots of friends when out walking a greyhound, since people are attracted to their elegant and beautiful lines and sweet faces. ;)

The youngest is nine months and her favourite game at the moment is trying to pulls the dog eyeball out of its socket
I can't imagine anyone allowing a child to do this to any dog, no matter how gentle - and even greyhounds have limits.

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 08:58 AM
think Greyhounds are the almost perfect dog. But that doesn't mean you will. And even if you do think retired racers are perfect that doesn't mean that you and a retired racer are right for each other.

Many people adopt dogs for all the wrong reasons or without knowing anywhere close to enough about the breed or about dogs. As careful as the best adoption groups are about choosing the right adopters for the right dog, dogs still end up being relinquished--returned-- to adoption groups. The reasons for the returns, called bounces, are often incomprehensible to me. The biggest problem in Greyhound adoption is that living with a Greyhound often looks too easy. When an adopter brings a retired racer home, at some point he realizes he is living with a real dog--and a very large dog at that. Real dogs have real needs. Take the time to learn what you need to know to make your match a successful one.

It's my opinion, as someone who works with problem dogs for a living, that the more often a dog is rehomed, the more likely it is to develop behavioral problems. And naturally the more severe the problem, the less adoptable that dog becomes. I can hope that educating prospective owners and asking them to be truly honest with themselves will help keep every Greyhound in the home in which it is originally placed.

Everyone involved in Greyhound adoption goes through horrible turmoil because of retired racers that are bounced. They second guess their placement strategies and policies, they question if they should have or could have seen something that might have prevented each unsuccessful adoption. They lose sleep and shed tears and wonder why they keep doing adoptions.

So I'm going to do all I can to convince you not to adopt a retired racer. Every item on this list relates to a reason that has resulted in a retired racer being returned.



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10 Reasons NOT to Adopt a Retired Racing Greyhound

1. They shed.

Yes, they have a short light coat. Yes, they are easy to groom and maintain. But they are dogs and like every other breed that has fur they do shed. They shed lightly, but they do shed. Get used to it or get a stuffed toy. If you don't think you can become accustomed to thinking of dog hair as a condiment, don't get a real animal.

2. No matter how gentle Greyhounds look, they are still large to very large dogs.

An overly excited, untrained 45-95 pound Greyhound may knock down smaller children or a a frail person. And Greyhounds tend to hold their ears back and their tails tucked and balk when they are stressed. Folks that don't know the breed might mistake this for aggression and find it too frightening to live with --especially in a dog this large.

3. Dogs and lawns are not a great combo.

Unless you have a very large yard that you can section off so your dog has his own area, it isn't likely that you can have a great lawn and a greyt dog. Get used to it or get a cat so you can use a litterbox. Greyhounds love to run and while they don't need a lot of exercise, when they run they will destroy your landscaping. If gardening is your passion, a dog who loves to run may not be your best choice.

4. Dogs make messes.

Even the best mannered, best trained dog gets sick. and if he gets sick, he isn't going to rush to the kitchen or the bathroom or some other easy to clean surface. The rugs are where the traction is--that's where he'll barf. Even elegant-looking dogs like Greyhounds get gas, barf, and/or get diarrhea at some time in their lives. Dogs track in dirt. Dogs and fancy furnishings, expensive rugs, and elegant decor aren't a good mix. If you can't stand a little dirt and fur, if fancy things are really important to you, or if your life's dream is replacing Martha Stewart, don't get a dog--even a quiet, clean dog like a Greyhound.

5. Greyhounds love (and need) soft, warm places.

If you want a dog that you can house outdoors or if you can't stand the idea of a dog on your bed or furniture, this is not the breed for you. Greyhounds are not suited to living outdoors and those bony joints need padding and a soft warm place to rest.

6. If you don't have time for a child, chances are you don't have time for a dog.

If you have children and all your time is spent at soccer games and school activities, unless your Greyhound can be part of the activities, you don't have time for a dog. Dogs are social animals that need physical and mental stimulation. And just because they are quiet, gentle dogs, doesn't mean they don't need to be trained. Training isn't about obedience as much as it's about forming a trusting relationship and establishing a way to communicate.

7. Dogs and children are not as compatible as Hollywood would have you believe.

Greyhounds have little padding and they have skin that tears easily.They have little protection from falling toddlers or rowdy children. They have a quiet nature and do best in a tranquil environment. If any of your children are under school age or your kids are particularly active, don't get a Greyhound.

I'd even go a step farther and tell you don't get any adult dog if you have young children. Dog bites are one of the leading causes of death in children. And I can assure you, biting a child is a leading cause of death in dogs. If you insist on combining children and dogs, research breeds very carefully and commit yourself to learning and taking all the steps necessary to make the combination work. See the Resource Review section for more information.

8. Just because your lifestyle and interests change doesn't mean you can abandon a dog like a used toy.

Divorces, job changes, relocations, and new babies happen. If you can't be as close to certain as humanly possible that your retired racer will be part of your life for all of his life, don't adopt.

9. Greyhounds are easy live with but they do have special needs.

Their lack of body fat, long thin bones, fragile skin, and sensitive souls means they need to be protected from extremes of temperature, rough environments, and inappropriate handling. Thousands of years of breeding to build quick reaction times, create blazing speed, and to foster work away from and independent of human direction means they must be kept safely in fenced areas or on leash at all times.

10. Adding a retired racer should never be an impulsive gesture.

Don't adopt because you feel sorry for them or because it's fashionable. To paraphrase a bumper sticker from the Association of Pet Dog Trainers, A dog isn't just for Christmas. It's for life.



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Now that I've given you reason you shouldn't adopt, Let me share a chapter from Retired Racing Greyhounds for Dummies. I've adapted the chapter and the contents slightly to fit this format.


10 Reasons to Adopt a Retired Racing Greyhound

I can give you almost 25,000 reasons to adopt a retired racer. That's the estimated number of retired racers who were available for adoption each of the last three years (based on calculations from the National Greyhound Association and the American Greyhound Council). Only 18,000 retired racers are being adopted annually, which means that more than 7,000 Greyhounds are still needlessly being put to death every year.
But, just because I can't think of any reasons not to adopt a retired racer, doesn't mean they're the right dogs for you and your lifestyle. Do your research carefully before you make a retired racer or any dog a part of your life.

1. You know what you're getting when you adopt an adult dog.

Regardless of breed, adult dogs make good adoption choices. You can easily put your common sense aside when you look at a cute little puppy and make choices only from your heart. But many people who get a dog because they couldn't resist that cute puppy face live to regret it, because they don't realize what they're in for. Looking at an 80-pound dog is good reality therapy. When you adopt an adult dog, you get to see the adult personality and temperament. The temperament a dog has as an adult is often different than what you would have seen in the same dog as a puppy. You also get to see the physical characteristics of a full-grown dog. You know exactly what size the dog is going to be. That can make it easier to make a good choice. Plus, aside from getting a great companion, you just plain feel good about adopting a grown dog whose fate is otherwise uncertain at best.

2. Adult dogs require less work than puppies do.

As cute as puppies are, they are a lot of work. Aside from having to be housetrained, puppies teethe, chew, and need much more exercise and attention than adult dogs. And the work doesn't last for just a few weeks. Many breeds have the characteristics of puppies until they are well over two years old.

3. Retired racers are great house mates.

Retired racers are low-maintenance. They require minimal grooming; their exercise needs are low to moderate for a dog of their size. They're compliant and have a personality that helps them adapt quickly to a new lifestyle. Most Greyhounds are naturally laid-back, well mannered, and sensitive. Plus, they're intelligent and respond well to the right training methods. Sounds like a great house mate to me!

4. Retired Racers adapt to a variety of lifestyles.

A retired racer isn't perfect for every family, but he can fit perfectly into almost any lifestyle, as long as you take the time to pick the right retired racer and teach him what he needs to know to be a valued family member. Retired racers are adaptable and do well in loving homes with families who understand their needs. They deserve no less.

5. Greyhounds are gentle and quiet.

One of the misconceptions about retired racers is that they are aggressive dogs because most people have only seen photos of Greyhounds racing, with muzzles covering their faces. The muzzles are used to help protect racing Greyhounds from injury and to determine the winners of close races. Outside of the racetrack, however, Greyhounds are usually quiet, gentle, docile, and compliant. If you're looking for a watchdog, choose another breed. They blend well into families with well-mannered children. Most Greyhounds love the company of other dogs, and many live happily with cats as well. Some Greyhounds adapt well to homes with very small animals.

6. Greyhounds don't need much exercise.

Another myth about Greyhounds is that, because they're bred to race, they need lots of room to run and constant exercise. But Greyhounds aren't marathon runners; they're sprinters. At the track, they only race once or twice a week. In homes, however, they romp for short bursts and then turn back into couch potatoes. While a fenced yard is best, a daily walk or two and a chance to run in a fenced yard or field from time to time are sufficient.

7. Greyhounds are very clean.

The coat of Greyhounds is so light and short that grooming is a breeze. They shed only lightly. Many Greyhounds groom and clean themselves much like cats do. Their coats aren't oily, so they aren't as prone to doggy odor as some breeds are.

8. Retired racers are healthy.

Retired racers are free of many of the inherited ailments that plague other breeds. For example, hip dysplasia is virtually unheard of among Greyhounds. Their average life expectancy is longer than that of most large breeds--12 years or more.

9. You can find the racer that is right for you.

With nearly 25,000 retired racing Greyhounds available each year, you can "design" your perfect dog. Know what color you want? You can find a Greyhound to match. Know what size you want, from 40 to 100 pounds? You can find a racer to fit your needs. Want a couch potato or a fishing buddy? No problem. Need a dog who can live happily in the city? You'll find him. Want a companion for your aging mother? There's one that fill the bill. Whatever you're looking for, somewhere there is a retired racer waiting to race into your life and into your heart.

10. Greyhounds are fun.

Many adoption groups have an annual reunion picnic and sell the obligatory event T-shirt. Our group's T-shirt from last year's reunion picnic said it all: " Life with a Greyhound is one big picnic." And that's why most of us have more than one.




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heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 09:00 AM
Lucky that is exactly what i just read about them,everything you said.I SWEAR THE MORE I KEEP READING ABOUT THEM THE MORE I AM REALIZING THIS DOG WAS MADE FOR ME

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 09:17 AM
Remember the first rule of housebreaking is CATCH THEM IN THE ACT. People always say, "they know they did wrong because they look guilty." Your greyhound is not capable of guilt they look worried becaue they know you are upset, but they don't have a clue as to why.
Greyhounds are crate trained dogs meaning they don't do their business in their crate but go to the yard (turn out area) to do their business. In a kennel environment they are used to someone coming along every 5 hours or so and letting them out they don't know they are supposed to "ask." They actually more closely relate "waking up" to "going out" than anything else. If some disturbance "wakes" the kennel between turnouts many times the dogs will have accidents.

You are now going to teach your greyhound that the house is the crate certainly the largest crate they've ever seen and the yard is the turn out. In the beginning they may see the main living area as the "crate" but to them the door that goes to the yard, and the door that goes down the hall, are the same. They both go "outside" the crate. Your job is to teach them that the door to the yard is the correct one and the hall is still part of the crate.

You do that mostly by paying very close attention. If they go down the hall, you need to go also and guide them back to the correct door. If you allow your greyhound full, unsupervised run of the house, and they get in the habit of having accidents in the spare room, it is much harder to teach them.

Squirt bottles work well to discourage males from marking a quick spray and a sharp "no" will make them quickly stop and go outside.

If your greyhound starts to have an accident -- a sharp no and a shake of the collar and then getting them outside right away will usually serve to teach them. They are dogs that want to please and will mostly react without a lot of yelling or hitting.

Praising them when they go outside also helps to reinforce the good behavior.

When putting them out before bed or before leaving for work you want to make sure they are staying out long enough to really finish. Sometimes they will run out and quickly do just enough to run back in & get praised but not enough to be able to go through the night or through a day of confinement.

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 09:18 AM
Like i keep saying perfect dog...Crate trained dog,it almost sounds to good to be true....................

GsdDiamond
November 18th, 2004, 09:32 AM
Heidi....why does it look like you're talking to yourself? :eek:

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 09:37 AM
I know ..HEE HEE I thought that myself :o :o i keep seeing all this info about them and am so excited i cant help it.............................................

GsdDiamond
November 18th, 2004, 09:53 AM
There was a recent study done. It showed that talking to oneself increased work performance. Of course that same study said that one shouldn't answer oneself.
Do I see you answering yourself? Hmm? :crazy:

mastifflover
November 18th, 2004, 10:07 AM
Heidi you are losing it but I agree this might be the perfect fit for you. I have met quite a few of these retired Greyhounds and talk about sweet the lady down the street has 3 she calls them her 40mph couch potatos. My suggestion is that you talk to one of the rescues and find one that you think will fit your life and foster with the option to adopt. But I did read something out of Florida today that they have added slot machines to the greyhound race tracks and the rescues feel that this is going to see tracks closing (Yeah) but the sad part is the dogs will be the ones to pay the price and will be abandoned or euthanized or abused and this is distressing the rescues. They feel that they will be inundated with dogs and not nearly enough homes or fosters for them. Does anyone know how well they socialize with other breeds. I have only met them with Buddy casually when we are out for our walks and we have walked with them but not in a play situation. Just curious

mona_b
November 18th, 2004, 10:09 AM
heidi,I was just wondering,do you still have Damien?

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 10:29 AM
Mona no i dont ,but he is doing awesome,he is with a lady that owns a dog bed and breakfast,his name is now Danny,he has started his trainging for service dog,she takes him to church and didnt think damien was an appropiate name....She actually sounds very proud of him and wants me to see him and what he has learned,i do like to think i had some part in how well he learns things....

Schwinn
November 18th, 2004, 10:30 AM
My only worry is if they run away from you, you're screwed! (good luck catching them!) :crazy:

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 10:33 AM
I know i read that also,never ever let off leash..Believe me i would be very very very cautious with this dog if i get one....I would never catch it,i could see it now,me with cigarette dangling out of mouth running after a greyhound what a comical vision that is... :crazy:

mona_b
November 18th, 2004, 10:41 AM
What happened?Why did you give him up?

Sorry for the questions,but I haven't been on for a while and just need an up date.

Lucky Rescue
November 18th, 2004, 10:47 AM
As your article said, there are so many greyhounds needing homes, you can get one that is perfect for you!

I really think this might be a better choice for your situation than a high-drive, high energy working dog like a GSD.

These greyhounds are not used to getting attention, and they are used to living in crates, so no crate training needed. Of course, once the dog is settled in it won't need to be crated all the time.

They housebreak easily and many rescues will have them already housebroken before adoption.

Does anyone know how well they socialize with other breeds.

Most greyhounds can learn to get along with a variety of other animals, unless they are highly predatory and then cats, etc are out.

Greyhounds from the track might be 5 years old and have never EVER seen any other breed of dog. One of my greyhounds was not good with small dogs, simply because he didn't know what they were. But with proper introductions, they could be good with other dogs although I probably wouldn't introduce some of them to very small dogs which they may see as prey.

Other greyhounds can be fine with all animals. I did see a huge 90lb greyhound leap into the air at a recent adoption event to try and snatch a Yorkie from it's owners arms, so common sense must be used.

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 10:49 AM
WEll besides the food and toy agressive issues,when i took him back home with me..Long story short i ahd a boyfriend come over and stay the night,so i put damien in crate shut the bedroom door,was fighting with bf..Next morning Damien would not eat and would not let me pet him,i thought ok he will get over it,but this went on for about 2 and a half weeks i would go to pet him when i did he would growl at me,i would throw him the ball he would take it and go in crate..ICOULD NOT pet him or anything without him growling at me ,talked to my vet he said I should re home him while he is young...And if i did not find the perfect place for him i wouldnt of let him go,but i did and i have seen him with her and he is very happy she has huge backyard a rottweiler and mastiff that are hers and i am am finally ok with what i did,so i know in my heart i did the right thing and it doesnt matter what people think about what i did...................And yes i will be getting a dog,just taking my time trying to find the right one for me and i think the geyhound will be it..

mona_b
November 18th, 2004, 11:03 AM
Yes heidi,you did do the right thing.Something we told you to do in the begining.But we won't get into that. :)

A friend of mine adopted a Greyhound.I'm trying to put the pic up,but I'm having troubles doing it.But I will keep trying.And a neighbour has 2 that they rescued.

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 11:06 AM
I loved him that is all i can say also.......This breed sounds just great...................................

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 11:07 AM
Yeah i want to see the pics,try to get them..

mona_b
November 18th, 2004, 11:11 AM
I know you did.

I'm trying,but i'm getting nothing when I click on Manage Attatchments,it's doing nothing.

I'll try again later..I better get some sleep.I'm on nights and doing 12 hours, with not much sleep is a killer.

Lucky Rescue
November 18th, 2004, 11:18 AM
Here is one of the dogs I fostered. His track name was "Hello Archer" and he must have been fast as he lasted 4 years on the track.
http://pic10.picturetrail.com/VOL320/1047157/2094399/31799175.jpg


Mona - hope you get some much needed rest!

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 11:23 AM
Good night,thanks..Ok someone just told me i do not want this breed because if i am walking it,it will try and chase anything small it sees>>>Any opinions on that..

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 11:24 AM
HOw cute,what do you think of them???

BMDLuver
November 18th, 2004, 11:29 AM
Our neighbour has one that he adopted. He is shy , quiet and very reserved when meeting a new person or animal. He definitely is not a chaser on leash. Greyhounds can jump high heights I believe.. LR may be able to confirm this.. We had friends in Niagara who adopted one and they went from a 6 foot fence to an 8 foot fence as when playing catch a few times he scaled it and over he went. I don't know if this is common for all of them though?

Lucky Rescue
November 18th, 2004, 11:31 AM
Ok someone just told me i do not want this breed because if i am walking it,it will try and chase anything small it sees

Most of the racing greyhounds are taught to walk properly on leash, and should not lunge or pull. Like any dog, they may want to chase prey but can learn they may not do so on leash.

One thing about greyhounds that I loved - they do NOT sniff every blade of grass and stone on a walk. Since they are sighthounds, scent is not that important to them, so they also don't stop and pee 50 times on a walk.:p

Mine walked with their heads up, always scanning in the distance for anything that moved.

Couple other things - most greys cannot "Sit" due to their very long, and powerfully muscled legs. They usually either stand up or lie down.

They MUST have raised food bowls and cannot eat off the floor.

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 11:34 AM
There is this lady i see every sat,walking two greyhounds on a busy street out here,and they seem to walk fine..

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 11:47 AM
I just talked to someone who knows about the breed and he said no they will not take off like that on leash,the only thing he said would be of concern is 8 hours home alone,but he said that is still ok,most people do work 8 hours a day....

Karin
November 18th, 2004, 12:51 PM
I think a Greyhound would be the perfect roommate for you. Not all sight hounds have the need for speed. Most Greyhounds are retired at 4 years of age, when the racing age has met it's limit. They still have many years left.
When I worked at the Humane Society we had two tracks nearby. Every year up to 500 dogs are retired and every year we could only place roughly 150 of these unwanted dogs. It broke my heart.
I know many people with sight hounds who trot their dogs while riding their bikes. A friend of mine even has a full size pool for her 6 Greyhounds and 20 acres with plenty of running room...
I know many people who also travel year round, living in their RV's with the dogs.

Please get a Greyhound....or two!

Goldenmom
November 18th, 2004, 12:52 PM
Heidi, many, many dogs are home alone for 8 hours/day, including mine. Nothing the matter with that! The problem would be if its a pup. You won't have to be concerned, as I believe you are looking at an older dog. Don't jump into anything quickly, do research and talk to many people that own the breed and rescue them.

I believe you have learned by your past mistakes and hopefully this would be a forever home for some lucky dog. You just need to state to the rescue etc... that you are not home for 8 hours and to please match you with a very laid back, relaxed dog that is happy to chill on the couch for 8 hours, but ready to roll when you get home!

Good luck Heidi and please keep us updated.

Heather and her 3 Golden Girls

Lucky Rescue
November 18th, 2004, 01:34 PM
Our last dog was home alone all day every day. I didn't like it, but he was better off there than dead. He was an adult when we got him, and there wasn't much of a problem.

An adult greyhound would be thrilled to be able to lounge around all day on soft beds, and get lots of attention at night!:) It'll be 1000% better than anything he/she has ever had before!:)

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 01:56 PM
I did let them know i work 8 hours a day,but after that i have all the time in the world,i dont go out all the time,i am a homebody......I just cant get over how perfect this breed sounds,ihave read a few places that a good 20 minute walk and they will veg on the couch the rest of the day and after what i saw last night of what happens to them this is the one for me...........................

lilith_rizel
November 18th, 2004, 02:01 PM
Is anyone else on this site against racing animals, for entertainment. Both my husband and I are 100% against horse and dog races, just because we think that it is cruel to have an animal that it;s only purpose is to race and win. Poor things.

Sneaky2006
November 18th, 2004, 02:03 PM
I love greyhounds! Our local mall has pretty frequent greyhound rescue days. They walk around the mall with them, all wearing coats, then back to the main part and they sleep on their big pillows... and they don't move, and they're so sweet! I am always so happy when we go to the mall and they're there. We always make it a point to circle a few times and stop by them for pets at every chance....
Hmmm, so will most greyhounds chase cats?? :rolleyes:
Good luck with this Heidi... they do sound perfect!

lilith_rizel
November 18th, 2004, 02:03 PM
I myself have always wanted a greyhound. I think they are really pretty, especially the siver one I seen about a month ago.

Lucky Rescue
November 18th, 2004, 02:06 PM
Is anyone else on this site against racing animals

Yes, because of the extreme cruelty involved with dog racing it just breaks my heart. :sad:

mastifflover
November 18th, 2004, 02:10 PM
I am not a big fan of horse racing but the horses are treated way better than dogs are. I am totally against dog racing I think it is cruel and the way they are treated is horrible

lilith_rizel
November 18th, 2004, 02:14 PM
I just can't stand seeing animals be raced. I think when an animal is purchased it should be purchased for the reason of companionship, and not for the reason of making the owner money. Animals are not gambling tools, the are compainions, our creators creatures.

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 02:18 PM
I am against racing dogs,i never realized how they retire them like that and treat thme like s***......just for people to gamble on....No i dont beleive in it either,i do not know how horses are treated but if it is like dogs then no..................................

lilith_rizel
November 18th, 2004, 02:21 PM
My mother-in-law has two horses and 2 or 3 burros, they are never ridden. She has them for companionship only, and to provide a safe haven, where they can enjoy a more "wild" setting. Plus the horses are a bit on the small side. They love the attention from their family, and they have still yet to warm up to me. I think that they are jelous that James is around me more. First time James brought me to see the one horse "Sport" he nudged me off the small hill I was standing on, and went right back to James. :D I think Sport thought that if I was gone, James would never leave him. Which he hasn't really.
I am perfectly fine with horse back ridding, but racing, I think is just cruel.

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 02:24 PM
I have never gone to horse races not big on that,i am against rodeos and team roping...............................

lilith_rizel
November 18th, 2004, 03:06 PM
That I agree with too.

Schwinn
November 18th, 2004, 03:49 PM
Is anyone else on this site against racing animals, for entertainment. Both my husband and I are 100% against horse and dog races, just because we think that it is cruel to have an animal that it;s only purpose is to race and win. Poor things.

I'm not against the actual racing of the animals. I don't think there is anything cruel about that. I don't see the difference between that, or flyball, or agility, or any of the other sports involving animals. Some of the horses are treated very well. I don't know enough about greyhounds to have a real opinion. I am very much against the way they are often treated when they are retired, but I don't think this has anything to do with the sport, more the individuals involved with the sport.

As for the rodeo, I am against most of it. I've talked to people about the steer roping, and I've been told that a lot of the calves see it as a game. At first I found this hard to believe, but I look at the way Daisy and I play, and I suppose it's possible. Again, I don't know enough about it to have an opinion. You either hear from those involved who say that it isn't cruel, or those who really don't know any more than what they see on TV and say it is.

Bottom line--I'm for treating animals humanely, and anything that involves cruelty should be outlawed.

chico2
November 18th, 2004, 03:56 PM
I watched a program on Animal Planet about grey-hounds and there was one of many organizations who had adopted out 15.000 greyhounds over the years.
They are beautiful,mostly very good-natured,very loving.....a perfect pet for Heidi :thumbs up

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 04:12 PM
Chico from what i have read so far i think this dog was made for me,i think it is fate.................... :D :angel: :angel: :angel: :angel:

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 04:27 PM
OK someone just said why would i want a dog that will take off the first chance it got????I should get a dog that wants to be with me..And he said they have the brain the size of a pea....I guess everyone has there opinions

chico2
November 18th, 2004, 04:32 PM
Who on earth would come with such a stupid comment????

mastifflover
November 18th, 2004, 04:35 PM
Some one with a brain the size of a pea

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 04:40 PM
He thinks he knows everything,he is the guy that told me he could of helped me with my gsd........He is a car dealer need i say more,there always has to be someone negative and he is an avid gsd lover...................

Lucky Rescue
November 18th, 2004, 04:49 PM
I've been told that a lot of the calves see it as a game.

You don't think that being hit hard enough to make them burst from the shute, roped, yanked off their feet, dragged by the neck and hogtied would be considered fun by the animal? If that is considered fun, I'd like to see the cowboys undergoing this treatment and ask them how enjoyable it was.

Fun for the guy doing no doubt, but a needless cruelty to the animals. There must be another way for these guys to prove they are macho studs without having to torment dumb animals to do it.

And greyhounds love to run of course, but I would much rather see them doing it for the pure pleasure of it, and not treated like commodities who are thrown in the garbage when the warrantee expires.:(

heidiho
November 18th, 2004, 04:53 PM
SAME WITH HUNTING TO ME,when the deer has a gun then call it a sport...............

heidiho
November 19th, 2004, 10:23 AM
The lady from adopt a greyhound e mailed me back,i told her my living situation and she said i sound like the perfect mom for a greyhound,also said they can be left alone from 8 to 10 hours tops,she said they have lots of familys that have adopted greyhounds that work and they do fine

jackieb
November 19th, 2004, 10:33 AM
with regards to walking on the l;ad they walk very well the ones i walked did. We use to donate and help at out local greyhound rescue in west yorkshire in england. They had a charitie event a fund raiser as they were broken into so they need to replace valuble items. Well on this fund raiser we walked a couple of the greyhounds and my eldest even had a go they were ver placid and according to the owners there they loved lying around.

Apparantely soft bedding old quilts etc is a good idea i used to donate all ours to them. Even in England they put coats on them in the cold and its not that cold in west yorkshire well not compared to here. Lovely dog though

heidiho
November 19th, 2004, 10:38 AM
ANOTHER thing i was thinking they dont seem like very emotional dogs,do they wag there tails???I have never seen them do that....

heidiho
November 19th, 2004, 10:39 AM
I guess the fear i have is i am gonna go from having a very aggressive dog to a very timid .shy dog....

mastifflover
November 19th, 2004, 10:51 AM
Heidi stop stressing you will be fine they are not an aggressive breed. They do have a high prey drive but that is not a problem since you will just work on that when you are training. Yes they do need coats even for when it is damp out they do not have a lot of bodyfat to keep them warm. They are shy but you can also work on that slowly.

heidiho
November 19th, 2004, 10:56 AM
I know i am a stress case ......I am gonna try and go out there this weekend and see some of them and get a feel for them............

Lucky Rescue
November 19th, 2004, 11:03 AM
All the greyhounds I have met were not shy, but took a bit to come around in the new surroundings.

Mine loved playing with stuffed toys, and were very affectionate and yes, wagged their tails a lot.

AZ has a wonderful greyhound rescue. You just need to go visit, and maybe offer to foster and that way you can find the perfect dog for you.

mastifflover
November 19th, 2004, 11:09 AM
Good idea you will see how different one can be from another and most of them will become more personable as they get comfortable and feel secure in their home. Remember this is probably a really scary change for them they literally have no human interaction at least in a loving way and that is not something anyone or dog would get over in a day. It will require work and lots of love and I don't think that will be a problem for you. Like any rescue they will need to feel safe and comfortable then you will start to see changes in them and that is when you will decide that you might need another one. Of course if you get one that has already gotten a great start with a foster you will probably notice a big difference in them compared with ones that have not been fostered yet. But that is understandable and it will give you an idea of how much they will change.

heidiho
November 19th, 2004, 11:28 AM
I jsut emailed her to see if i can go by there this weekend...Yeah i think az does have a huge adopt a greyhound program....Well i cant wait to hopefully give one a good home,will wait ti lafter x-mas and probably do it in January

Karin
November 19th, 2004, 11:58 AM
ANOTHER thing i was thinking they dont seem like very emotional dogs,do they wag there tails???I have never seen them do that....


They are very emotional dogs! If you rescue a Greyhound he/she will spend the rest of it's life thanking you..

They love attention and to snuggle. They want to please all the time.

Every placed Greyhound I have seen becomes a shadow...this may be the only drawback. They tend to hug their new owners in every step. Always by your side. If you turn around too quick, you'll fall over them. They crave human companionship.
If you get out of bed in the middle of the night, be prepared to lose your spot to any sight hound. Your pillow & blanket will be claimed by one.

They have a need to always touch someone they love.

And they do very well alone for lengths of time.

sujean
November 19th, 2004, 11:59 AM
But I did read something out of Florida today that they have added slot machines to the greyhound race tracks and the rescues feel that this is going to see tracks closing (Yeah) but the sad part is the dogs will be the ones to pay the price and will be abandoned or euthanized or abused and this is distressing the rescues. They feel that they will be inundated with dogs and not nearly enough homes or fosters for them.

being from florida, our shelters are completely over run by grey hounds. just in my county, i can count 4 race tracks. it is so terrible and a lot of these dogs just sit in the shelter shaking. it is so horrible to see.

our local pet stores also has a greyhound day once a month with all retired dogs. between the new slot machines and the recent hurricanes, there are sooo many displaced animals now in our shelters. it is a terrible thing to see.

when we adopted tyson, he was 6 years old, 85 pounds, chronic ear infections, allergic reaction to EVERYTHING. we debated about adopting a grey hound but when we saw tyson, we knew it would be very hard to place him due to his age, size, and health problems so we had to take tyson home. we would adopt more but in our 1700 sq ft, 4 cats and a 90 pound dog is just about our limit!!

ok. i'm done rambling. work sucks. :p

Goldenmom
November 19th, 2004, 12:00 PM
Gosh, these dogs sound like gems! It sounds like anyone would be very lucky to have one! Good luck Heidi, WOW!

Heather and her 3 Golden Girls

Goldenmom
November 19th, 2004, 12:03 PM
being from florida, our shelters are completely over run by grey hounds. just in my county, i can count 4 race tracks. it is so terrible and a lot of these dogs just sit in the shelter shaking. it is so horrible to see.

our local pet stores also has a greyhound day once a month with all retired dogs. between the new slot machines and the recent hurricanes, there are sooo many displaced animals now in our shelters. it is a terrible thing to see.

when we adopted tyson, he was 6 years old, 85 pounds, chronic ear infections, allergic reaction to EVERYTHING. we debated about adopting a grey hound but when we saw tyson, we knew it would be very hard to place him due to his age, size, and health problems so we had to take tyson home. we would adopt more but in our 1700 sq ft, 4 cats and a 90 pound dog is just about our limit!!

ok. i'm done rambling. work sucks. :p


Tell us about your Greyhound, what is he like?

Heather

Lucky Rescue
November 19th, 2004, 12:10 PM
Every placed Greyhound I have seen becomes a shadow...this may be the only drawback. They tend to hug their new owners in every step. Always by your side. If you turn around too quick, you'll fall over them. They crave human companionship.

This is SO true, and for one person it's wonderful and for another it may be annoying. The one I pictured earlier - Archer - actually tried to get in my lap and I had to draw the line at that! What a sweetie!

I didn't keep the greyhounds I fostered because this "velcro-dog" thing just isn't what I was looking for.

But if what you want is a sweet love-sponge then this is the breed for you!:)

heidiho
November 19th, 2004, 12:16 PM
You guys are getting me really excited about this,that is all i want is a dog that wants to lay on couch and veg with me,sleep in bed go for walks and stuff..As you can tell i am single......This is EXCATLY what i am lokking for..Karin so even though they get attached to you they are ok when you are at work for 8 hours??They dont get to lonely...I also heard their skin is really thin any precautions i would need to take????

sujean
November 19th, 2004, 12:16 PM
Tell us about your Greyhound, what is he like?

Heather

oops, i should have been clearer-we ended up adopting tyson-who is a belgian mal. he was a special needs pet and so sweet so we adopted him. what i meant to say was i wish we could have also adopted a greyhound but we have limited space. we felt that it would be harder for tyson to find a loving home and at greater risk of being put down :sad: BUT :p he has a loving home now and gets spoiled rotten!

however, good news (for me!!), we are looking for a bigger house with a large yard so another dog could be in my near future!!

Lucky Rescue
November 19th, 2004, 12:27 PM
Yes, heidi - their skin is like tissue paper and rips very easily. Most dogs coming from the track are scarred.

Just make sure they can't bump into sharp objects, but even with care, they may get a rip or two. The scarring is almost unavoidable, but you want to keep them from getting puncture wounds.

When I took mine to visit my brother, by the time we got there his leg was bleeding just from scraping it on the car seat!

One other thing - these dogs are used to living on a very strict schedule, so try and give some structure to the life any dog you bring home. This is will help it adjust faster.

heidiho
November 19th, 2004, 12:28 PM
Also what do you feed them>?? And how much??

Writing4Fun
November 19th, 2004, 12:50 PM
What beautiful dogs! They're so regal. I was thinking of you, Heidi, when I was watching "Dogs with Jobs" today. They had a 10-minute segment about a dog who had actually lost her job - she was an ex-racer who was rescued because she had come in last one too many times. Poor baby! She was such a sweetie, though. It was great, the way the rescue had a kind of "half-way house" - she had an outdoor kennel with access to an indoor area, but instead of a bare-bones pen like she was used to, it had a sofa, rugs and a TV (the TV was mounted on the ceiling) so she could get used to family living. She settled in no problem! Within hours, she was lying on the sofa on her back, legs sprawled, cuddling up to the stuffed animal they had given her to play with. So cute! A beautiful brindle, too. :thumbs up

LavenderRott
November 19th, 2004, 12:57 PM
My mom has a greyhound, a standard poodle, a yorkie and a chihuahua. It is one big happy family. She does not leave the chi loose with the other dogs when she is not home, more because she is worried about rough play then anything else.

Yes, they are wonderful. You might want to make friends with someone with a fenced yard though. I know Mags likes to get outside and stretch her legs on occasion. Trust me, you could never keep up!

Karin
November 19th, 2004, 01:03 PM
You guys are getting me really excited about this,that is all i want is a dog that wants to lay on couch and veg with me,sleep in bed go for walks and stuff..As you can tell i am single......This is EXCATLY what i am lokking for..Karin so even though they get attached to you they are ok when you are at work for 8 hours??They dont get to lonely...I also heard their skin is really thin any precautions i would need to take????

I am getting excited about you rescueing a Greyhound! And I do not even know you! This seems like the perfect match.. I am also feeling stupid...why did I not think of this before..or...maybe I'll just blame you..(lmao here...I thought you maybe just be stuck on a GSD...you have it in you girl..this is the perfect breed for you..harmony in the home.)

LR answered your question on the thin skin. Yes the do have very thin skin. There entire body is structured for light weight. Skin tears can be a mess.
Avoid intense heat and direct sun for any length of time.

When I first started working with animals, about the time Noah was here, Greyhounds were adopted by vet hospitals for the use of there blood as blood transfusions..they have the richest blood around. Their heart is huge compared to their body structure...it is meant to pump at a faster rate under speed...or love. I choose the latter.

Couch potato's....get used to it.

heidiho
November 19th, 2004, 01:18 PM
Karin i do love gsd's alot and was stuck on that,but i know that it just isnt the best thing to do in an apt....And i saw something on greyhounds and they just sound great... Do they like going in cars for rides and stuff????

heidiho
November 19th, 2004, 01:19 PM
Yeah i already talked to my best friend and we know i couldnt bring him over there to hang out in the yard ,being Arizona and all...

heidiho
November 19th, 2004, 01:40 PM
Greyhound folks,

People seem to be concerned that new adopters will be will be put off from adopting a shy dog because of the list of things we've posted that frighten them.

Since my list was quite long (Yana may have a record number of fears), I feel I can speak with great authority when I say that adopting a timid greyhoiund has been one of the best things I've ever done. I couldn't be happier with Yana - my little special needs girl.

My first greyhound, years ago, wasn't shy at all. He was a "normal" greyhound--loving, goofy, gorgeous. People would stop their cars to look at him and he never hesitated to go to strangers for pets. I adored him. He had no fears, and didn't have to try to be wonderful, it was just a part of him.

But Yana is... well... special. When she learns something new, or overcomes an obstacle that terrifies her, I see a bravery that was missing in my first greyhound. If I laugh loudly and Yana runs from the room, I can see the courage it takes for her to come back and peek around the corner to see if it's safe. I see her tentatively reach toward me to see if I'm going to hit her or pet her. This tiny girl is the poster dog for bravery.

When she's outside and someone rattles a trash can and frightens her, then she summons up enough courage (and trust in me) to continue the walk or finish doing her business- I am in awe of her.

When I see her running through the house playing with the cat (she used to be afraid of Babycakes) or pushing her way behind me on the couch because it's her spot (she used to be afraid to get on the couch) or demanding to be petted (she used to sit with her back to me, afraid to look at me)-- I am thrilled. It means so much to me that she worked her butt off to overcome the fear that was inside her.

Would I adopt another real shy greyhound? In a second!! Yana makes the tiny successes taste so sweet!

She gets an extra treat tonight. I'd give her an extra hug but she's still afraid of 'em -- sigh.

Sandy & Yana the Brave



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


No one seems to know what makes these timid greyhounds so fearful. Some think it is abuse but really it is just the way they are. Just as some humans are shy, these greyhounds feel perfectly safe and comfortable in the familiar kennel surroundings they were raised in. It is only when confronted with the strange environment of home life that they become fearful.

Think about enriching your life by either adopting or fostering one of these special dogs -- you'll never be sorry. They make great second, or third, or ___ dogs! They take an extra amount of patience but they give back more than three-fold in love and adoration.

I think we should start calling them the Special Needs Extra Brave dogs instead of shy!!

Kari Morrison Young

mastifflover
November 19th, 2004, 01:46 PM
I love sucess stories what a brave baby.

heidiho
November 19th, 2004, 02:25 PM
I know that is a great story

heidiho
November 19th, 2004, 02:27 PM
The thing that stands out the most for me,is the ROUTINE part,i am so routine and predictable it is not funny..I dont like anything messing up my routine,so this dog would love my house.. :D

chico2
November 19th, 2004, 04:37 PM
Heidi,I know you are excited,as I would be and these beautiful dogs need homes soo badly..
I hope you will have a chance to meet some and get to know them before you pick one to take home,I know it will be difficult,but I am sure the shelter-person will help you.
Are they far away from you???
When will this happen?

mastifflover
November 19th, 2004, 04:49 PM
Heidi you should get on the list to foster and you might find your ideal baby by fostering it will also give you more experience with them and learn more about them. But I guess if you foster you will never want to give it back so it will be in its forever home

Karin
November 19th, 2004, 05:25 PM
Karin i do love gsd's alot and was stuck on that,but i know that it just isnt the best thing to do in an apt....And i saw something on greyhounds and they just sound great... Do they like going in cars for rides and stuff????

Each dog is different, depends on their own likes/dislikes and experiences.

Most Greyhounds are use to travel. Like any other dog or human they are allowed an opinion. ( I have seen some get car sick, only a few)

I want to see you with a Greyhound, it makes perfect sense, but not all are alike....that's what makes it so great. Find one (or two) that fits...or let them fit you...let the dog pick?
I see a new pooch in your future.

Lucky Rescue
November 19th, 2004, 08:57 PM
I always suggest greyhounds when first-time owners come here looking for suggestions, as they are very good apt. dogs and good for first time owners. Some people are put off by their size but they are much better for apts and working owners than MANY small breeds.

I never suggested it to heidi because she had her heart set on a GSD and I know what it's like when you love a certain breed!:)

Sneaky2006
November 19th, 2004, 10:58 PM
As for retired racers... are they automatically not good with cats? I don't know much about the races, or greyhounds for that matter. Or will this depend on the dog like any other breed?

LavenderRott
November 20th, 2004, 03:10 AM
Since racers are taught to chase small furry rabbits, most rescues consider them not good with cats and small dogs until they see otherwise.

My mom's grey and her yorkie were playing tug with a stuffed animal last year and the yorkie accidently got bitten. The damage was tremendous and cost mom plenty in vet bills. I can only imagine what kind of damage would have been done if Mags (the grey) had bitten little Lindy on purpose!

Much better to be safe then sorry.

Now that I think about it, my brother has a pair of greyhounds and a cat. The three seem to get along just fine.

Lucky Rescue
November 20th, 2004, 08:42 AM
Much better to be safe then sorry.
Agree. Like any dogs, some greys might be good with cats and other pets, while some aren't. Depends on the prey drive.

I do not believe anyone who tells me a dog is good with cats (especially if the dog is being dumped) until I see it with my own eyes.

Greys don't have very strong jaws - they have sacrificed everything for speed - but could kill a cat and even dogs who are good with their OWN cats need to be monitored in a new home with strange cats.

One of the most ferocious cat chasers I saw was a 5 lb Yorkie who chased my 18 lb wuss cat across three yards. :eek:

Karin
November 20th, 2004, 05:10 PM
Agree. Like any dogs, some greys might be good with cats and other pets, while some aren't. Depends on the prey drive.

I do not believe anyone who tells me a dog is good with cats (especially if the dog is being dumped) until I see it with my own eyes.

Greys don't have very strong jaws - they have sacrificed everything for speed - but could kill a cat and even dogs who are good with their OWN cats need to be monitored in a new home with strange cats.

One of the most ferocious cat chasers I saw was a 5 lb Yorkie who chased my 18 lb wuss cat across three yards. :eek:

Exaclty! Both LR & Lavenderrott...Greyhounds have been trained and conditioned over time to use their speed and sight to hunt. It is ingrained .

Small fuzzies are a concern. You have to really know your greyhound or any sighthound before you test them on the subject...they are lightning fast afterall! Well, almost...

Some Greyhounds do great with small animals, most do not. (Talking a large population of the unwanted ones..)

It is always better to use caution.

heidiho
November 22nd, 2004, 09:44 AM
I will probably wait til after the holidays to get one,i called this weekend they are at Petsmart the second saturday of every month,so i will be going next month to see them...I really do love the gsd the best and if i could find one that could live in my apt i would....Oh well.....

mastifflover
November 22nd, 2004, 10:03 AM
Heidi I think this is a much better dog for your lifestyle and in turn that will make you happier and the dog happier. Then you can have a storybook ending "And they all lived happily everafter"

heidiho
November 22nd, 2004, 10:05 AM
I know,it is the more logical thing to do......There is a show on wed on hbo Real Sports about Greyhounds.....