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Question for you baking gurus!!!

moontamara
November 11th, 2004, 07:42 PM
I just got a lovely recipe from my mom for "perishky" which is a meat/vegetable filled pastry type thing... My question is whether or not I can substitute the 1/2 cup of lard (or crisco) with butter or margarine. I don't know where to find lard or crisco in Korea... I'm sure the texture would be somewhat compromised, but would it still work if I used butter??? Thanks soooooo much for your thoughts and advice! :love:

Cinnabear
November 11th, 2004, 07:46 PM
I'd go with marg. The butter might be too rich. Good luck

BMDLuver
November 11th, 2004, 07:52 PM
I believe lard is pig fat - so maybe that's what you have to ask for? My vote is for margerine, sounds much nicer than the first option.

moontamara
November 11th, 2004, 09:38 PM
Thanks you two!! I think I'll try butter at first, since that's what I have on hand right now... but if that's not so great, I'll try margarine -- and if that's not so great either, I'll go and ask for pig fat!! :eek:

Thanks again! :D

Sneaky2006
November 11th, 2004, 09:42 PM
Pig fat just sounds so gross! My mom always baked with that, and hubbys mom too... I have never even bought crisco in my life! I know on some cookie recipes it says to use crisco OR butter, so I really don't think it makes much difference.
You have to let us know how it turns out.

badger
November 11th, 2004, 11:26 PM
I would steer clear of lard - oink oink - but if you can find crisco, it makes a very light pastry. My mother still uses it for her pies and they are amazing. Butter will give you a heavier, richer pastry, which you might not want with such a hearty filling. But failing crisco, butter beats margerine, taste-wise.

sujean
November 12th, 2004, 07:26 AM
moontamara: are you korean or are you over there with the US army?

moontamara
November 12th, 2004, 07:40 AM
Sujean, neither of the above! I came over here as an ESL teacher from Canada, and am now married to a Korean. Thanks for asking ;)

raingirl
November 12th, 2004, 07:47 AM
I am an amature pastry chef so I can totally help.

Is the Lard for the pastry or the filling? (at first I thought it was for the filling, but as I read I think it's for the pastry right?)

I'll assume it's for the pastry for now. NEVER use margarine for pastry. It's too soft and has a too high water content. It will be greasy and burn easily.

I say never use Margarine for any thing. Margarine is hydrogenated and very bad for you (they force high speed hydrogen molecules into the fat to make it solid, but it can cause cancer!!). Plus it really sucks in baking. Butter is way better for you anyway, even though it may have more cholesterol and fat, because I would rather a more natural product that modified margerine.

Personally, I only use cold unsalted butter for pastry in most cases, because of the flavour, and it's the healthiest. Using Lard or Vegetable Shortning (Crisco) will make it a little more flakey though, and a little less heavy. Most store bought crusts use lard. Lard is rendered pork fat. It has no flavour. Lard and Crisco will give the same results. I think Crisco (the company) also makes Lard as well. I knew someone who knew the brand they sell in Korea, and just e-mailed her. Criso is the same as margerine though, in that it's hydrogenated (bad bad bad), which I don't like. I only use Criso now when making buttercream for cake decorating.

If you like to cook or bake at all, I HIGHLY suggest you get Regan Daley's book "In the Sweet Kitchen". Best book I ever got. It's a baking BIBLE! 70% of the book is reference material. She broke it up into catagories like "fats" "flours" "sweeteners". In Flours she explains the difference between "all purpose" "cake and pastry" "whole wheat" (and even more rare ones), including their gluten content, what they work best for, how much to substitute etc. It's the most amazing book!

sujean
November 12th, 2004, 11:59 AM
Sujean, neither of the above! I came over here as an ESL teacher from Canada, and am now married to a Korean. Thanks for asking ;)

i only ask b/c i am korean (born in the states)-i think it is great you are teaching over there-if not for being married and with furry family, i would try to do the same over seas!

is your husband korean?

moontamara
November 13th, 2004, 06:49 AM
Raingirl, I totally agree about margarine and never buy it, but would do anything to make my mom's recipe work!!! Thanks so much for you help with this, and thanks to all of you!!! (Oh yeah, the lard IS for the pastry). I will look for the book you mentioned -- sounds great! THANK YOU!!!

Sujean, yes, my husband is Korean (so I'm happily stuck here, perhaps for my life!). So is Sujean pronounced "Soo-jeen" like the Korean name? It's a beautiful name! Have you ever visited Korea? Working and teaching here has been great, although sometimes I feel like living a whole life here is challenging. It's better now that my husband's job has changed and we have more time together! Anyway, nice to "meet" you!!!

sujean
November 13th, 2004, 09:03 AM
Sujean, yes, my husband is Korean (so I'm happily stuck here, perhaps for my life!). So is Sujean pronounced "Soo-jeen" like the Korean name? It's a beautiful name! Have you ever visited Korea? Working and teaching here has been great, although sometimes I feel like living a whole life here is challenging. It's better now that my husband's job has changed and we have more time together! Anyway, nice to "meet" you!!!

yes, it is like the korean name. and thank you but in the states, especially in the south, i get smart a** comments about how i don't look like a farm girl...where they get the idea that my name is like may beth is beyond me. then my respons is always, "well, that would be because I'm korean, stupid." :mad: some people are just so half minded...

so i'm interested in getting you opinion of being married to a korean man! i mean, i know you are going to be biased because you love him and all but western women, especially the feminist types (like me) have a hard time with the korean culture. for example, whenever i got together with my family (when i was younger), the men sat around expecting to be served on hand and foot. of course, now that i am older and wiser, my thought on that is "no way! get up off your a** and get it yourself, you lazy!"

has korea progressed in lessening the male dominance?? i am very interested!

it is very nice to "meet" you too!

chico2
November 13th, 2004, 03:43 PM
Moonie,I would definetly use butter,I would never buy or eat margarine.
I bake a lot in the winter,mostly cinnamon-buns and the odd pie or real Danish flaky pastry and I always use butter,wouldn't dream of using margarine for anything,it's awful stuff...

SarahJane
November 13th, 2004, 03:46 PM
Some kinds of margarine, like Becel, are non-hydrogenated. They have no trans fat at all, as opposed to butter. That's what I use all the time, and it's good in some kinds of baking and cooking as well.

melanie
November 13th, 2004, 04:12 PM
i use margarine in my 'cheap' cakes, that is cakes that are just in the cupboard for the daily grazing husbands, anything special or pastry it is butter all the way. i have heard of crisco in the past but never know what it is, thats just grose, yuck, ewwwwww why use it in something nice, i thought you would only use that sort of thing in those grose sausage recepies etc, ewwww yuck.

nuh only butter and marg here, but then i also have different qualities of margarine too for baking for different things, i bake alot as we are not rich so i like to make sure there are lots of sweets for hubby to munch on, therer is nothing worse than being poor and having nothing sweet or nice to eat once in a while, it makes it soooo depressing (and there is no way i will buy a cake for $10, :eek: what a waste and i could do better).

so there is always a nice cake or brownies in the cupboard, but depending in the consumer, the purpose of the cake nad my mood toward the reciever will depend on the variety of marg or butter they get, if i like you i use the best, if i dont like you much i will use the cheap stuff. hey its my way of discriminating without being open or too mean about it :D :D :D

(and if i realy really dont like you i would not advise you eat the cake) :D :p

moontamara
November 13th, 2004, 06:13 PM
THANKS all!!!

Sujean, the quick answer is yes and no.... but I'll p.m. you more about that!

onecatandonedog
November 13th, 2004, 07:48 PM
i read the ingredients on becel and other "non-hydrogenated maragarines". they are not hydrogenated but there is often a certain percentage of palm-oil or coconut-oil in them. butter is more natural so i prefer it. butter is good for you as long as you eat a reasonable amount of it.


one thing about lard though is that it makes the absolute best pastries and breads. chinese bakeries usually use lard, it makes the bread of pastry very moist and it has a good flavour.

glasslass
November 17th, 2004, 12:35 PM
This Saturday, hubby, Mom, and I are going to a cooking class held in a winery up in the hills. The subject this class is "Pastries, Pies & Tarts". We've taken several classes there and the instructor used to teach the culinary classes at the college in that area until he had a difference of opinion with the Chancellor. I'm sure we'll get some good information about this very topic! Can't wait! Do know that once I got cheap and substituted "Can't Believe It's Not Butter!" for butter in my favorite cookie. The results were disappointing. Cookies came out soft instead of crisp and chewie. I ate them frozen and they were ok, but not how I like them.

moontamara
November 17th, 2004, 05:26 PM
mmmmmm do you want to send some of your class projects to Korea???? :p