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Fences

lilith_rizel
October 18th, 2004, 07:12 PM
My husband and I were just discussing what type of fencing we want to put up for our dog, when we move back out the the country in a few years. I said that Cano may be able to jump the fence if we have a normal chain link fence. My husband pointed out that the wire that goes into the ground for invisible fence may get damaged, and then we would have to pull the whole thing up just to find the damaged area. We are trying to figure out what is the best kind of fence to buy for our dog. Luckily, we have about 3 years to make our decision. But we just want other people's input on which is the better fence.

downloader
October 18th, 2004, 07:53 PM
What kind of dog do you have?
www.bluewhippet.net

melanie
October 18th, 2004, 07:58 PM
good fences are a passion of mine, with out them i am not happy. when i move houses i base all my decisions on the actual fence present, good fence i will take it.
the best fence we had and have at the mo is colorbond fencing, its like a solid fence that can be nice colors. the dog cant see out and no one sees in and they are nice and high so you get lots of privacy. :crazy:

lilith_rizel
October 18th, 2004, 08:08 PM
We have a yellow lab.

goldenblaze
October 18th, 2004, 09:16 PM
We use a invisible fence and love it. As for getting damaged you don't have to pull them up or anything like that. There is a probe that comes with the fence to help you find any breaks. You can also use the collar to find a break, you have up to 10 feet with the collar before having a shock. We put ours in 4 months ago and no problems, training was easy and both dogs never get a shock as they know the beep and turn around. The fence is not a babysetter though, we still look out every few minutes and remember we live down a old dirt road with not much going on at any time only we hear the cows from time to time. Only dogs around here are all Goldens except Jordie and they are all well care for. Oakley, Parker and Blaze what a group.
:)

LL1
October 19th, 2004, 09:24 AM
I would get a 6 foot high fence, chainlink or wooden. I would not use an invisible fence, I have heard of many dogs that go right through them, and it doesn't stop anything from coming into your yard. This is part of why alot of rescues won't adopt to homes with them.

goldenblaze
October 19th, 2004, 09:54 AM
I would get a 6 foot high fence, chainlink or wooden. I would not use an invisible fence, I have heard of many dogs that go right through them, and it doesn't stop anything from coming into your yard. This is part of why alot of rescues won't adopt to homes with them.


Again with the invisible fence it is all in the training, I can not say that enough. No dog will go through the fence if they are trained right and the collar is working as it should. Many people I know have them and a great friend has it for two Labs, hyper young labs that would love to run but don't they are trained right. As for rescue's not sure about all but I do know that the HS in Smiths Falls with the GOlden's have no problem allowing us to adopt a Golden and yes they know I use a invisible fence. As for not keeping others out, no but no fence is a babysetter and must still be watched. Blaze started on this invisible fence at 5 months and never crossed it, Jordie is 4 yr and never crossed it and Jordie hates cats for some reason. He has never been close to a cat in his life but the point is daily there are many cats walking around here as I live next to a farm with 15-20 barn cats and not once has Jordie tried to cross to get a cat. They work people and work good, you must train your dog not to cross and they won't. I would never use something that I felt was not safe and hey I have 800 hundred feet of invisible fence and my boys love it.

LL1
October 19th, 2004, 10:04 AM
I understand the training part, and I still wouldn't trust them, especially with dogs with high prey drives - a rabbit etc running through their yard, they wouldn't stop. Most shelters do not require fences at all, it's different with many rescues tho, and many won't allow them.

lilith_rizel
October 19th, 2004, 10:20 AM
Cano is too much af a baby to chase animals. We have lots of squirrels and birds that live in a tree, that isn't even 10 feet away from him. They are always out around him, and all he does is just lay there and watch them eat. the bird seed we put out for them everyday. What a cutie. I have still yet to get a picture of it, but everytime I go outside to take it, the animals go right back up into the tree. :( Even when he isn't on his chain, and we are just playing, he doesn't bother them. What a sweetie.

goldenblaze
October 19th, 2004, 10:22 AM
I understand how people feel but I will never stop using my fence. My dogs do not chase things outside the line and as for rescues not adopting pets to me because of it, I will have no problem finding a great dog if I ever want to add one more to our family. When talking about dogs with high prey drives, hey a golden puppy and a cat hating shih tzu do great in the fence, no problems of us at all.

LavenderRott
October 19th, 2004, 10:28 AM
While I wouldn't base my house buying decision on the fence in the yard, I will say that my next house will have a 6' to 8' privacy fence.

I wouldn't trust my beagle mix with an underground fence in a million years! One bunny would equal one gone dog!

goldenblaze
October 19th, 2004, 10:35 AM
While I wouldn't base my house buying decision on the fence in the yard, I will say that my next house will have a 6' to 8' privacy fence.

I wouldn't trust my beagle mix with an underground fence in a million years! One bunny would equal one gone dog!


Isn't that funny, my friend has a beagle Jake and he visits here often so we started him on the collar and he is doing well too. Darn dogs, so much worry and joy come with each one we have. :)

LL1
October 19th, 2004, 10:45 AM
This isn't personal, these are opinions about fencing - use whatever you like. Someone asked for opinions, so they've been given.

By high prey drive I was thinking more about Malamutes, Jindos, Huskies, Border Collie, GSD, Aussies, Malinois, etc.

When talking about dogs with high prey drives, hey a golden puppy and a cat hating shih tzu do great in the fence, no problems of us at all.

TalonsMa
October 19th, 2004, 10:45 AM
We have a 6' chainlink fence with privacy slats...so far so good.
Regarding the invisable fences, I understand how they keep an animal inside the yard, but it doesn't keep other animals out does it? :confused:

LL1
October 19th, 2004, 10:47 AM
You're right, they don't.


Regarding the invisable fences, I understand how they keep an animal inside the yard, but it doesn't keep other animals out does it? :confused:

TalonsMa
October 19th, 2004, 10:52 AM
That's what I thought....that doesn't sound safe to me.

lilith_rizel
October 19th, 2004, 11:14 AM
What would we be able to do to make the 6 foot fences dig proof. has anyone tried anything that works? We just want to find all the options.

LavenderRott
October 19th, 2004, 11:45 AM
While I haven't tried it myself, I have talked to people with diggers. Since putting in an electric fence involves digging a trench, dig the trench. Then either put chicken wire down or cement in the trench. That way, when the dog digs, he/she runs into an immovable object.

Mysts38
October 19th, 2004, 12:07 PM
I personally dont like the invisible fences..for two reasons..One-I have seen so called well trained dogs come running through it with no problems..they got conditioned to the shock in the collar....2.The shock value,I just dont believe in using the shock collar,no matter how mild it may be....

We have a 6 foot wood fence,with a gate,and on the bottom is thick chicken wire to prevent digging,since most dogs dont like the feel of it against their nails/paws

But whatever works to keep your dog safe is the best method for you

lilith_rizel
October 19th, 2004, 01:07 PM
Myst, how spendy are the wooden fences, I like the idea of privacy. We would probably fence in about 1/2 acre or so, depending where in the country we are going to move.

Mysts38
October 19th, 2004, 01:21 PM
HI Lilith

We fenced an area that was 50 feet by 50 feet for Hannah..you dont need to do the whole 1/2 acre,just give your dog a good sized run..Hannah has her run,with a dog house and a pool in it....its plenty of space for her as an adult..and she wont be spending hours in there,its just to let her have an outdoor place of her own..

It really depends on where you live and what kind of wood you use..pressure treated is the cheapest and lasts a long time...cedar looks nice,but its very expensive,and you can keep costs down by putting a fence board every couple of feet on either side,,,vs putting the boards side by side..this way you still have privacy

goldenblaze
October 19th, 2004, 01:43 PM
Myst, how spendy are the wooden fences, I like the idea of privacy. We would probably fence in about 1/2 acre or so, depending where in the country we are going to move.

I had a wooden fence put in my yard when I lived near Ottawa and for 550 feet it cost us $4,349.00 alot of money but worth it if you have a need for one.

Just one point people asking again about the underground fence keeping other animals out. No it does not but again no fence is a babysetter. Last point if the dog never gets a shock from the fence because trained the right way the dog will never get use to the shock, again I shocked myself to feel what my dogs would get and it was not bad. Like walking in front of a TV you all have had that shock. There are many underground fences some are better than other again like anything you buy cheap is not always the best. I choice the one I did because 5% of it's sale does go to the HS and also the HS does think it is a good idea. Like LL1 wrote This isn't personal, these are opinions about fencing and this is my opinion. :)

LL1
October 19th, 2004, 02:16 PM
Good write ups on invisble fences and why alot of rescues won't adopt to homes with them, provides some more info, I would never adopt to a home with one either to be honest:

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About Invisible (Electric) Fencing
Invisible or electric fencing is a very popular fencing option that many of today’s homeowners are choosing. While there may be some aesthetic and cost benefits to this type of fencing, we in Rescue have discovered a great deal of problems related to safety, security, and humane treatment of the dog with this type of fencing, particularly with its use with a rescued Keeshond.
Because the Keeshond’s coat is extremely thick around the neck, in order for the electronic shock collar to be effective on a Keeshond, the shock level must be turned up very high and the length of the prongs must be very long. The high shock level and length of the prongs can cause pain and injury to the dog. Some dogs we have known have tried to scratch the shock collar off, catching their foot in the collar and getting burned and receiving puncture wounds from the prongs.

Another problem with the use of this style of fencing is that a dog will still run through the “fence,” accepting the first shock but refusing to return to the yard for a second shock. Keeshonden are very intelligent creatures. They CAN think and seem to understand cause-and-effect processes as it relates to their behavior. It does not take long for the average Keeshond to learn that if he received a shock leaving the yard, he’ll get another shock going back into the yard. The result is a Keeshond loose in the neighborhood, likely a new, unfamiliar neighborhood. The dangers of further injury and possible death are enormous.

This leads us to yet another reason that the use of these fences with Keeshonden are a great concern. Rescued Keeshonden have lived in many different environments by the time them arrive into the Rescue program. Many have lived with several families during their lives, then find themselves either living by their wits alone on the streets or dumped in shelters. To get into Rescue, they may have traveled a great distance on what we call a “transport” or “railroad”, being handed from one transporter to another. Then they are in foster care sometimes for several weeks or months, depending on their physical and emotional conditions. When they go to a new home, it will take quite a long adjustment period (several months, maybe longer) for them to realize and accept that this is finally their home. During that adjustment period, the risk of the Rescued Keeshond trying to “escape” is great. An invisible fence will NOT prevent this.

Not only will an invisible fence NOT keep a dog in the yard, it will not keep another animal or human from coming into the yard to either injure or steal your pet. Sure, a standard fence can be jumped or dug under by any creature (human or non-human) wanting to get in or out. But it does slow them down to some extent, and in many cases completely stops the creature from crossing the fence line.

These are just some, but not all, the reasons why the Board of Directors of Keeshond Rescue of the Central States has decided to not adopt a Rescued Keeshond into a home in which the intent is to use an invisible fence. We would be glad to discuss alternatives to invisible fencing. Please feel free to contact any Board Member listed at the bottom of this page.

the above was from:

http://www.petfinder.com/shelters/keeshondrescue.html

another from a different rescue:

Invisible Fences for Dogs?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Invisible Fencing is a system using an underground, electrically charged line around the perimeter of your property in conjunction with a collar that the dog wears, which delivers an electrical shock. Some dog owners subscribe to electric fencing because it is effective for their particular dog. Other dog owners are not so fortunate.

Some of the disadvantages include:
Malfunctions - These happen quite infrequently. But remember, you are dealing with an electronic device. With time, wear, or water, the possibility of malfunction will increase. If the collar is triggered and remains on, it will cause severe trauma and can be fatal to your dog (can cause severe burns).
Locked Out - Your dog sees a bird or squirrel outside the property line, charges, and has gained so much momentum by the time it reaches the perimeter that it crosses the line and is afraid to come back. The animal is "locked out" of its own property. Some dogs will become anxious and run away.
Other Dogs - Just because your dog won't cross the boundary to get out of the invisible fence doesn't mean that another dog won't cross the boundary to come in your yard, which may compromise your dogs safety, depending on the health and temperament of the other dog.
Traumatization - Many dogs won't eat for days after receiving one or two shocks because they are so traumatized. For this reason, many trainers are averse to any type of shock training.
Incorrect Training - Dogs who get shocked when trying to approach people passing by can associate the shock with the people, and thus become either overly aggressive or overly timid around people.

Also, we are all very negative on invisible fences, for many, many reasons. For one thing, even if your dog stays inside the "fence", it doesn't prevent any other people/animals from coming in. An aggressive dog could attack your dog, and your dog would have no place to hide.

Even a dog who is well trained to an invisible fence has a "trigger". With some, it is the sight of a deer or other animal. With others, it's thunder (if they're afraid of thunder). In these instances, very often a dog will go through the invisible fence due to excitement/fear. However, when the dog calms down, he/she will not cross the fence to come in. So essentially, your dog is trapped outside of the fence.

We have very rarely adopted dogs to folks with invisible fences, and then, only if they promised not to ever leave the dog unattended when he/she is out in the fenced area. They really give you a very false sense of security.

NOTE: My neighbors had a dog with ideopathic epilepsy. During one of her seizures, she went through the fence. A neighbor found her coming out of her seizure in the middle of the road. Fortunately, she was ok.

I've had first hand experience the last item, with the first CARE foster dog I adopted out. I used the bad judgement to let him go to a home with an invisible fence. They called a week and half later, saying that he was so traumatized that he had become unresponsive and obstinate, and they didn't think he would ever bond with them. Needless to say, I couldn't get there quickly enough to pick him up. The "unresponsive and obstinate" dog was completely overjoyed to see me and practically flung himself into arms and licked me all the way home. OK, can you blame me for adopting him myself after that?



http://www.chathamanimalrescue.org/invisiblefences.shtml

goldenblaze
October 19th, 2004, 02:23 PM
Many rescue's will not adopt a dog or a cat to family's with children. Some disagree with that too.

goldenblaze
October 19th, 2004, 02:40 PM
Here is some I found too.
The Brand Most Recommended - and Used - by Veterinarians

In a survey conducted by V&L Research in October, 2003, a national sampling of veterinarian offices were interviewed to gauge awareness, acceptance and preference of electronic pet containment, and Invisible FenceŽ Brand. The results speak for themselves:

* 9 out of 10 (98.9%) veterinarian offices surveyed believe Invisible FenceŽ Brand electronic pet containment keeps pets safe at home
* 9 out of 10 (91.5%) veterinarian offices surveyed recommend Invisible FenceŽ Brand to their patients
* 8 out of 10 (84.5%) veterinarian offices surveyed have key personnel who own an Invisible FenceŽ system.

A panel of ASPCA experts nationally renowned in their scientific fields (panel comprised of veterinarians, veterinary toxicologists, animal behaviorists and animal science specialists) review the products submitted for the ASPCA Seal of ApprovalŽ.

Invisible FenceŽ Brand is proud to be the exclusive recipient of the ASPCA Seal of ApprovalŽ for use with dogs, for outdoor electronic containment and indoor electronic avoidance.


The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was founded in 1866 as the first humane organization in the Western Hemisphere. The ASPCA's mission is to provide means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States.

Over 750,000 members and donors nationwide support the ASPCA in its efforts to help animals. Invisible FenceŽ Brand proudly donates a portion of sales proceeds of our containment and avoidance systems to the ASPCA.

A panel of ASPCA experts nationally renowned in their scientific fields (panel comprised of veterinarians, veterinary toxicologists, animal behaviorists and animal science specialists) review the products submitted for the ASPCA Seal of ApprovalŽ.


OSPCA recommends Invisible FenceŽ Brand
The Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals awarded its coveted seal of approval exclusively to the Invisible FenceŽ Brand for superior quality in providing a safe and humane means of pet containment.

So again it is all in our own opinion.

lilith_rizel
October 19th, 2004, 02:44 PM
Looking at the posts, is seems to us that a privacy fence is more in our interest. It is useful for more than just keeping Cano in our yard. It will also do well in keeping other uninvited animals and children out as well, and will provide privacy to our family. It will also work for our childrens' play area, and won't have to worry about them going where they aren't supposed to. My husband and I decided that we would much rather spend more money on something that would benifit more aspects of keeping our entire family safer, than save money on something that would just benifit Cano.

Thanks to everyone who had their say. All the information was very useful. :thumbs up

LL1
October 19th, 2004, 02:45 PM
Definitely it's opinions, and beyond that it's also decisions based on experience - and rescues are generally different than shelters, they have more restrictions. I don't know any rescues that won't adopt to people with children in general, young children definitely for dogs they have not assessed with kids, or who they have assessed with kids and know they are not good with them. A safety measure, much like the decisions on invisible fencing - and I am glad to see it, the dog and child's safety should be most important of course.

goldenblaze
October 19th, 2004, 02:48 PM
Over and over again you are told it is all in the training. NO it doesn't keep other animals out but this fence is not a babysetter as I have wrote many times. It also depends on your dog and where you live. Both of my dogs will not cross to get a deer, dog, person, cat or anything. They do not get a shock because we took the time to train as we were told and our dogs are trained right. If it beeps they back up, in my yard there are deer, people cats and dogs going by and never did Blaze or Jordie try to cross or get a shock. I don't live in the city, I live on a dirt road in the country people walk their dogs off leash and everyone knows everyone and their dogs.
Common since when using a fence like this.

LL1
October 19th, 2004, 02:51 PM
I think you made a great choice!
Looking at the posts, is seems to us that a privacy fence is more in our interest.

goldenblaze
October 19th, 2004, 02:55 PM
Definitely it's opinions, and beyond that it's also decisions based on experience - and rescues are generally different than shelters, they have more restrictions. I don't know any rescues that won't adopt to people with children in general, young children definitely for dogs they have not assessed with kids, or who they have assessed with kids and know they are not good with them. A safety measure, much like the decisions on invisible fencing - and I am glad to see it, the dog and child's safety should be most important of course.


I am sure that on here was poohbear123 having a hard time to adopt a dog from a rescue because of children, and did LR not say somewhere that she will not adopt a cat to a family with children. Sorry if I am wrong but I am pretty sure that is that case. Maybe LR can answer that question for us.

goldenblaze
October 19th, 2004, 02:59 PM
Here is a thread on that very subject.

http://www.pets.ca/forum/showthread.php?p=56711#post56711

LL1
October 19th, 2004, 03:23 PM
As I said, young children, which I would call children under 8 is often not ok with rescues. I have the same policy.

LL1
October 19th, 2004, 03:28 PM
Yes you have, and I disagree.
Over and over again you are told it is all in the training.

This might well be true, and like many other rescues, I definitely will not risk one of my rescues.


It also depends on your dog and where you live.

melanie
October 19th, 2004, 05:19 PM
in the pasti have worked with native aussie animals, the biggest diggers i ever met were wombats, that is their job to dig and burrow. so we had to bury the fenceing material (in this case corrugated iron) to a depth of 2 meters, that is the only way the wombats would stay still they could dig in other areas of the enclosure but not near the fences and it worked a charm. but burying you fencing tin about half a meter would be jsut as effective for a digger dog i would imagine. also a good trick for diggers, fill the hole with the dogs own poo, this woks for most dogs (some a freaks and dont care) but they generally dont like digging their own poo. :crazy: