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Trimming fur on pads - English Setter or Setter Mixes

dmc123
August 22nd, 2012, 06:00 PM
Just a silly question that I have been wondering about.

This may be directed mostly at Hazelrunpack - but anyone with English Setters or mixes please feel free to chime in.

I am asking because Jessie's pads grow fur quickly. She hates for me to cut it - although she is good, just not happy. And I am not fond of doing the job, roomie does it more than me.

Will it just keep growing if not trimmed? Or will it wear off and only get to a certain length? I can imagine her walking about with "slippers" if I don't trim.

Advice?

Thanks,
Diane

Barkingdog
August 22nd, 2012, 07:48 PM
Just a silly question that I have been wondering about.

This may be directed mostly at Hazelrunpack - but anyone with English Setters or mixes please feel free to chime in.

I am asking because Jessie's pads grow fur quickly. She hates for me to cut it - although she is good, just not happy. And I am not fond of doing the job, roomie does it more than me.

Will it just keep growing if not trimmed? Or will it wear off and only get to a certain length? I can imagine her walking about with "slippers" if I don't trim.

Advice?

Thanks,
Diane
http://www.dogs-and-dog-advice.com/english-setter.html
this web site said you should trim the fur on their paws .

hazelrunpack
August 22nd, 2012, 11:25 PM
You can let it go if you don't mind the extra dirt. It does "max out" after a while. I do trim them about 3 times a year, mainly to control how much mud they track in. You don't need to trim it between the pads--I just snip off the longest stuff that's sticking out between at just above the level of the pad. At the same time, I comb the fur up from between the toes from the top of the foot and trim that off, too, and finish up by trimming the 'ankle/wrist' and leg feathers so that nothing is dragging on the ground.

It doesn't take too long per dog, but usually my back is about shot by the time I finish them all. :o

If she doesn't like getting it cut, make a game of it. Start slow, handling each paw individually for a little bit, then giving her a treat (I used to train with carrot coins--low calorie but they seem to like them :D). Increase the handling time as she gets comfortable with it, then introduce the scissors again. Our guys seem more comfortable if we tend to their feet the same way a farrier would shoe a horse--lean over her as she stands and bring the foot up to the back. If you're straddling her, she can lean against your leg while you're working on her feet. :thumbs up

Barkingdog
August 23rd, 2012, 11:06 AM
You can let it go if you don't mind the extra dirt. It does "max out" after a while. I do trim them about 3 times a year, mainly to control how much mud they track in. You don't need to trim it between the pads--I just snip off the longest stuff that's sticking out between at just above the level of the pad. At the same time, I comb the fur up from between the toes from the top of the foot and trim that off, too, and finish up by trimming the 'ankle/wrist' and leg feathers so that nothing is dragging on the ground.

It doesn't take too long per dog, but usually my back is about shot by the time I finish them all. :o

If she doesn't like getting it cut, make a game of it. Start slow, handling each paw individually for a little bit, then giving her a treat (I used to train with carrot coins--low calorie but they seem to like them :D). Increase the handling time as she gets comfortable with it, then introduce the scissors again. Our guys seem more comfortable if we tend to their feet the same way a farrier would shoe a horse--lean over her as she stands and bring the foot up to the back. If you're straddling her, she can lean against your leg while you're working on her feet. :thumbs up

My standard poodle hated to have his legs and paws touch . When he was
be trained to be a hearing dog the groomer let my dog have his way so when I met my hearing dog for the first time his legs where so matted you could not get a clipper through his fur. I was shocked. So when someone tell me they're getting a new puppy I tell the person to made sure and touch and brush their puppy all over it body so they puppy will get use to this.

hazelrunpack
August 23rd, 2012, 11:33 AM
We do that with any new dog, Barkingdog--puppy or older. Some really take to it. The day Brier arrived we had to give him a bath and groom him after--I did the other 6 dogs first with him watching and when I got to him, he let me do teeth, ears, nails, trims and body brushing! When Grace arrived a few weeks later, well, she was not quite so obliging! :laughing: But with patience and consistency, even Grace came around. :thumbs up

Barkingdog
August 23rd, 2012, 03:43 PM
We do that with any new dog, Barkingdog--puppy or older. Some really take to it. The day Brier arrived we had to give him a bath and groom him after--I did the other 6 dogs first with him watching and when I got to him, he let me do teeth, ears, nails, trims and body brushing! When Grace arrived a few weeks later, well, she was not quite so obliging! :laughing: But with patience and consistency, even Grace came around. :thumbs up

Marty does not like to have his legs brush , I got him when he was 2 yo. He is getting use it and like it when my granddaughter groom him. Yeah , you're new older dogs and cats should be trained to touch all over.

dmc123
August 23rd, 2012, 04:38 PM
Thanks to all - great advice. I didn't mean to say she hates having her feet touched, we've worked on that since she was a little bitty thing. I think it is just scary. I do like the idea of standing over her, going to try that next time. We've been putting her on her back and I think the other way might really work for her.

Thanks again.

Diane