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Newly Adopted Cat... changing behavior?

1iora
March 19th, 2012, 02:07 PM
Hello!
I just adopted an 8 year old cat. In the shelter he purred and nuzzled in his cage, but was uncomfortable when he got out. But we took him in a private room and he explored the room then hopped up on our laps.
We got him home and he was like he was in the private room - we had him locked in the bedroom with us.
He explored, ate, came over for several minutes of pets with purrs and nuzzling, explored, ate, came over for more pets, explored, played, and fell asleep on my boyfriend's leg. In the morning he woke us up purring and nuzzling our faces for pets, then laid in our arms and slept until we 'really' woke up.

He still wakes us up this way, but he no longer wants to be pet/held except for first thing in the morning. He follows us around the house and lays down wherever we are, but just out of arm's reach. He tolerates being picked up and petted, but extricates himself as soon as he has the opportunity. Sometimes he sees us entering a room and bolts out.

We've had him since Tuesday (the 13th). The first night he was locked in our room, the second evening we let him explore the rest of the house for a few hours. We now let him out every day when we're home but lock him in the bedroom at night and when we're gone. He didn't start being distant until the third evening, so a day after he first got to explore a broader area.

The first 30 hours he was snuggly, but since then he isn't. He seems to be adjusting away from us rather than towards us, and I would have thought he'd only be more comfortable with us over time.

I was concerned we were overstimulating him, so we ignored him for a few hours and that seemed to help. Previously (yesterday before we ignored him) he was running away when we got anywhere near him, and once his tail got all bushy when I walked towards him and he ran and hid under the bed (which he'd never done before) Now if I sit on the floor he'll nuzzle me as he walks past. I also bribe him onto my lap with treats, but he leaves as soon as he's eaten it (less than a day after we brought him home he was jumping up on my lap and staying there for quite a while)

We haven't changed his food from what the shelter gave him and we haven't moved any of his stuff since we brought him home. He otherwise is very good. He was brought into the shelter as a stray. About the time he started acting weird he also threw up (looks like undigested food) after eating twice in a row. But he still plays and doesn't seem sick. He attacks toy mice and plays with us and even chases his tail.

Do you guys think he needs more time to adjust? Is he going to end up just being un-cuddly even though he was at first?

Thanks!

sugarcatmom
March 19th, 2012, 03:41 PM
I just adopted an 8 year old cat.

:highfive: Yay for adopting older an older kitty!! :thumbs up


Do you guys think he needs more time to adjust? Is he going to end up just being un-cuddly even though he was at first?


Yes, I think he's still adjusting, and no, I don't think he'll be un-cuddly. He has a lot of changes to adapt to right now so he's probably distracted by all the new smells and sounds and stuff, and it's probably also making him feel a little insecure. Once he starts to feel more comfortable, I'm sure he'll be back to his regular cuddly self. If you can find a Feliway diffuser or 2 (Petsmart carries them, or you can get them online), that might help speed up the process. Otherwise the best thing is just lots of patience, lots of treats, and also letting him adapt in his own time. It will happen, I promise. :cloud9:

What's his name, by the way? Probably too soon to ask for pics, but consider this fair warning that pics are mandatory :D.

1iora
March 19th, 2012, 03:51 PM
Oh, I have pictures! (mostly from when he was still being cuddly)

His name is Rooster. The shelter called him that because he was brought in with a rooster. I live in Washington, DC, so it was uncommon enough for it to warrant a name.


Here are pictures, basically ordered from oldest to newest (social to anti-social to I'm-in-arms-reach-now-and-in-your-way-but-I-will-leave-if-you-bug-me)
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-LET2KRenKGE/T2eJSLPgMfI/AAAAAAAABpk/Ivvwwkga0v4/s640/IMG_0606.jpg

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-TkyiwGc8hlc/T2eJIf9QCRI/AAAAAAAABpE/7FKSbOCpplA/s640/IMG_0680.jpg

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-DbVYVeT6mO8/T2eJFDeIKGI/AAAAAAAABos/T3B-04Zj47g/s512/IMG_0700.jpg

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-6mTxtNNR0DY/T2ecJJnwNyI/AAAAAAAABpw/20z_8hF78w8/s640/IMG_0748.jpg

Love4himies
March 19th, 2012, 04:52 PM
Ditto on the adopting an older cat :highfive:

I'm a bit concerned over the throwing up and the change in behaviour. Would you consider changing his food?

SCM is right, new environment, new smells stresses a kitty out a bit. If he was cuddly at the shelter, he will be cuddly again when he settles down.

1iora
March 19th, 2012, 05:06 PM
He hasn't thrown up in a couple days, but we are starting to change his food now, to a grain-free one (he was on Hill's Science Diet, we're switching him to Nature something, venison, which had more protein and more omegas than the fish ones). Also I attempted to post pictures... don't know if they'll show up later. I'll just repeat the text portion for now:

His name is Rooster! We got him from the Washington Humane Society/DC Animal Shelter, and roosters are rare enough in the city that when a stray cat was brought in with one they dubbed the cat Rooster. We thought it was cute and kept it.

Love4himies
March 19th, 2012, 06:07 PM
Nature's Variety, Instinct, canned is one of my favourite foods and venison is my cat's favourite flavour. :highfive:

Love4himies
March 19th, 2012, 06:08 PM
He is a cutie pie :cloud9: :lovestruck:

BenMax
March 19th, 2012, 06:59 PM
Rooster is GORGEOUS!:cloud9:. Thank you for adopting an older cat.

I have a few cats and foster cats and kittens. Sometimes it takes more time than others to adjust. I recommend just let him settle and he will come to you on his terms. That is usually the way it is with cats that may have been in a shelter cage for a while. He just needs to know you and your routine. Once that is established you may want to open a thread on a cat not leaving you alone.:)

All the best and you will see in time that everything will work out fine.

1iora
March 19th, 2012, 09:20 PM
So, bad news, he threw up again while eating today. My bf was getting him fresh food and he started eating the little that was left in the bowl, and then threw up. We're transitioning him to grain-free food, but this was happening before we started mixing the new food into the science diet (which was what the shelter fed their animals). We have a free vet appointment on Saturday (thanks to the shelter/vets in the area), and I chose the one that'll do an internal parasite check for $29 as part of the initial exam, so I'm going to have that done. He's probably just gorging on his food, but better to be safe.

I do now think that maybe he isn't feeling good and that's when he doesn't act as sweet. He does play and run around the house and everything, but about a half hour after he threw up (actually, I guess it's regurgitation) I went upstairs and he was lying in wait at the top of the stairs, about to attack my feet! He got distracted by the stair rail instead (that's the weird moods he gets into... he'll spend 10 minutes attacking his tail, racing around the house and losing toenails in the carpet, or wrapping himself around objects such as the stair rail and attacking his own body parts on the other side), and I got his toy and he spent some time attacking that. Maybe him being more playful is actually him self-soothing or something. After he finished playing he was laying on the carpet and I was laying next to him, and I reached out a hand and he darted away. Earlier, pre-puke, he had been rubbing his body against our legs, and when I sat on the floor with him he sat next to me and nuzzled my hand when I put it near him.

So in the meantime we're going to try just giving him a lot of food (because we aren't home to give him a little every time he goes to his food bowl) and hoping that quells any fears he has about it getting taken away and therefore he'll stop gorging. We're also going to let him loose in the house from now on (before he was only loose when we were home), to hope that helps him adjust a little more easily. I may try putting out a second food bowl across the room from his current one... maybe having two food sources will also make him feel more secure in his food availability.

sugarcatmom
March 19th, 2012, 10:32 PM
I may try putting out a second food bowl across the room from his current one... maybe having two food sources will also make him feel more secure in his food availability.

Switching to canned food might also help. Kibble tends to swell in the stomach when it contacts moisture and frequently results in scarf-n-barf. You can leave canned food out for free-feeding if that's your preference (that's what I do). Some really good info at this site on the topic of feline nutrition: www.catinfo.org

Oh, and Rooster is a doll! He looks very kitteny. I also love his name. :lovestruck:

Love4himies
March 20th, 2012, 06:44 AM
I would ditch the kibble immediately. In my opinion, Science Diet is not a great quality food and you aren't doing your kitty any favours by continuing to feed it. As SCM says if they eat a lot at once, the kibble will expand in their tummies and make them vomit.

How often do you feed him? I find with canned, you are better off with 3 smaller meals than 2 larger ones. It just seems to settle better in their tummies.

As for having two places to feed him, I don't think cats can reason to that level. With my 2 cats that were starving, pregnant strays before they were trapped, their instinct is to eat everything that they can as fast as they can because they don't know when their next meal is going to be. Sweet Pea who was a house kitty before she became a stray, took her about a year to learn the feeding schedule and settle down her eating. My semi feral, Rose, who never had a home to live in, still scarves down her food and runs to eat when she sees another cat eating. As a result of them having food left out for them to keep them happy, they are both over weight :(. I guess my point is that time will probably be more of a factor then the amount of food you leave out getting your kitty to stop gorging. Feeding on a regular schedule is important too.

Good luck!!!!!

ownedbycats
March 20th, 2012, 07:12 AM
The throwing up likely is from eating too fast, since you say he just finished eating, and Love4himies gave some good advice on free feeding so Rooster doesn't feel the need to gorge. She's right that it may take time for him to get over feeling that he can't trust the next meal to come on time. Four years later, my cat will still gobble then throw up if our schedule changes and meals are late even by a bit.
There's another reason he may be throwing up, and that is hair balls. It's spring, shedding season, and he is likely swallowing some fur. Regular brushing can help (go slowly, let him sniff the brush before touching him with it) and there are things you can give cats daily that help with furballs, too if that is the problem.
As for the "weird" racing around the house, wrestling with things, cats stay playful well into middle age and sometimes even longer if they are healthy. Rooster may not be a kitten, but he still obviously has lots of energy and needs to excercise. :D Racing and wrestling are apparently his ways of doing that. Enjoy it, and have fun watching him and playing with him.

1iora
March 20th, 2012, 10:06 AM
We left him loose overnight and he still came in to snuggle with us in the morning =)
He's out now, so we'll see what sort of havoc he wreaked while I was gone.

I refilled his food this morning (there was still some left) while he wasn't in the room in an attempt to alleviate his fears a bit. He heard me doing it and ran in, but I was finished by that point and so he took a sip of water and went about his business. I'm also going to not pick up his food dish when I refill it (we were doing that before to measure).

I won't bother with the second food source. I'm not going to do wet food though. It's more work for me than cleaning up throw up every 5ish days. We are switching him to the grain-free food, so hopefully that'll help a bit with the expansion-in-stomach problem.

Thanks for the tips, everyone!

1iora
March 20th, 2012, 06:15 PM
Leaving him out seemed to help!
When I got home he sat on the couch next to me to watch tv, and when I wanted to lay down where he was sitting I picked him up and put him on my chest. He spent about a half hour laying there, with 5 minutes grooming himself and me. He hasn't laid on me outside of waking me up in the morning since his first day =) He might have stayed there, but he started batting at my face so I made him get down, then got a toy out.

He's still preferring to sit next to me (behind me in my desk chair, or on my desk next to my arm, on the couch next to my leg), but today he enjoys me scratching his face and doesn't move to arms-distance away.

No regurgitation problems. I refilled the food again when I got home even though there was a decent amount left. He saw me do it, but I poured directly into the bowl rather than lifting it up, and then tried to do other things that would interest him/distract him away from the food.

Jim Hall
March 20th, 2012, 06:25 PM
there you go just needed a little time i have had DU for 5 years and am still waiting

Love4himies
March 21st, 2012, 07:14 AM
We left him loose overnight and he still came in to snuggle with us in the morning =)
He's out now, so we'll see what sort of havoc he wreaked while I was gone.

I refilled his food this morning (there was still some left) while he wasn't in the room in an attempt to alleviate his fears a bit. He heard me doing it and ran in, but I was finished by that point and so he took a sip of water and went about his business. I'm also going to not pick up his food dish when I refill it (we were doing that before to measure).

I won't bother with the second food source. I'm not going to do wet food though. It's more work for me than cleaning up throw up every 5ish days. We are switching him to the grain-free food, so hopefully that'll help a bit with the expansion-in-stomach problem.

Thanks for the tips, everyone!

I am sorry to hear you won't be doing the wet food :(. Opening a can of food twice a day is really not that difficult and is so much better for your cat :shrug:. Please read the catinfo link that SCM posted. Kibble is killing cats :(.

marko
March 21st, 2012, 08:41 AM
With respect L4H - "kibble is killing cats" is way alarmist imo.

Although I 100% agree that overall wet food is much better for cats, I know puhlenty of cats that have lived very healthy and full lives on a kibble diet. The kibble didn't kill them, old age did. Old age kills us all (if we are lucky).

A high quality kibble may not be as good as wet but it won't kill your cat. :2cents:

btw - really cute pics 1iora :highfive:

Love4himies
March 21st, 2012, 09:57 AM
With respect L4H - "kibble is killing cats" is way alarmist imo.

Although I 100% agree that overall wet food is much better for cats, I know puhlenty of cats that have lived very healthy and full lives on a kibble diet. The kibble didn't kill them, old age did. Old age kills us all (if we are lucky).

A high quality kibble may not be as good as wet but it won't kill your cat. :2cents:

btw - really cute pics 1iora :highfive:

I guess we could say the same about smoking. Some people live to a ripe old age while smoking and others die at 40 of lung cancer :shrug:. It's about genetics and do you risk not having those "good" genes?

There is zero benefit for your cat feeding kibble.


http://www.catinfo.org/#My_Cat_is_Doing_Just_Fine_on_Dry_Food

Cats Need Plenty of Water With Their Food

The first paragraph on the Feline Urinary Tract Health page is as follows:

If I could have the reader of this webpage take away just one word from this discussion, it would be "water". If your cat is on a properly hydrated diet of 100% canned food - and no dry food - you stand a very good chance of never needing to read this webpage.
Water is an extremely important nutrient that contributes to overall health in every living creature. Couple this with the fact that cats do not have a very strong thirst drive when compared to other species, and you will understand why it is critical for them to ingest a water-rich diet. The cat's lack of a strong thirst drive can lead to low-level, chronic dehydration when dry food makes up the bulk of their diet.
A cat's normal prey contains approximately 70 - 75 percent water. Dry foods only contain 7-10 percent water whereas canned foods contain approximately 78 percent water. Canned foods therefore more closely approximate the natural diet of the cat and are better suited to meet the cat’s water needs.
I hear the reader saying: "But my cat drinks a lot of water so he must be getting enough!"
A cat consuming a predominantly dry food diet does drink more water than a cat consuming a canned food diet, but in the end, when water from all sources is added together (what’s in their diet plus what they drink), the cat on dry food consumes approximately half the amount of water compared with a cat eating canned food.
Put another way, a cat on a canned food diet consumes approximately double the amount of water consumed by a cat eating dry food.
This is a crucial point when one considers how common kidney and bladder problems are in the cat.
Think of canned food as 'flushing out' your cat's bladder several times each day.
Please keep in mind that when your cat starts eating a more appropriately hydrated diet of canned food, his urine output will increase significantly - often doubling - which is a very good thing for bladder health.
Because of this increase in urine production, litter boxes need to be scooped more frequently or more boxes need to be added to the home.
Please see The Litter Box From Your Cat’s Point of View for reasons why I strongly feel that clumping litter is the only sanitary choice of litter to use for cats. Non-clumping litters do not allow you to remove all of the urine and are not sanitary litters.

Jim Hall
March 21st, 2012, 11:35 AM
my vet and her husband keep cats they have all lived to 18 or so they all eat dry food that being said wet food is better but really dry food does not kill cats

sugarcatmom
March 21st, 2012, 01:04 PM
my vet and her husband keep cats they have all lived to 18 or so they all eat dry food that being said wet food is better but really dry food does not kill cats

And I know people that eat nothing but junk food and never get fat. Doesn't mean we should all eat junk food.

There's also a difference (as I've said so many times before) between *surviving* and *thriving*. I want my cats to be as healthy as they can possibly be, not just merely surviving, and diet plays a key role in good health.

A dry food diet does indeed cause a great deal of suffering and even death in our domestic feline population. Looking at the top 10 pet health insurance claims according to VPI, 7 of them can be linked to feeding kibble.

Top 10 Cat Conditions
1. Lower urinary tract diseases
2. Stomach upsets/vomiting
3. Chronic renal failure
4. Hyperthyroidism
5. Diabetes
6. Intestinal inflammation/diarrhea
7. Skin allergies
8. Periodontitis/Dental Disease
9. Ear infections
10. Eye infections

It's absolutely tragic the number of cats that die horrible deaths from a blocked urinary tract, and it's also absolutely preventable. Then there's feline diabetes, which is practically an epidemic now, another condition linked almost exclusively to feeding kibble. Will every cat that eats kibble get diabetes? Of course not. But how do you know which cat will and which cat won't? Remember, ALL cats do "just fine" on dry food, until one day they don't.

Love4himies
March 21st, 2012, 02:13 PM
And I know people that eat nothing but junk food and never get fat. Doesn't mean we should all eat junk food.

There's also a difference (as I've said so many times before) between *surviving* and *thriving*. I want my cats to be as healthy as they can possibly be, not just merely surviving, and diet plays a key role in good health.

A dry food diet does indeed cause a great deal of suffering and even death in our domestic feline population. Looking at the top 10 pet health insurance claims according to VPI, 7 of them can be linked to feeding kibble.

Top 10 Cat Conditions
1. Lower urinary tract diseases
2. Stomach upsets/vomiting
3. Chronic renal failure
4. Hyperthyroidism
5. Diabetes
6. Intestinal inflammation/diarrhea
7. Skin allergies
8. Periodontitis/Dental Disease
9. Ear infections
10. Eye infections

It's absolutely tragic the number of cats that die horrible deaths from a blocked urinary tract, and it's also absolutely preventable. Then there's feline diabetes, which is practically an epidemic now, another condition linked almost exclusively to feeding kibble. Will every cat that eats kibble get diabetes? Of course not. But how do you know which cat will and which cat won't? Remember, ALL cats do "just fine" on dry food, until one day they don't.

Thank you SCM :grouphug:

As I've stated before, there is NO doubt my Puddles would have been dead by 13 years old, had I not changed her food when she was 12 and going downhill very quickly. She will be 16 in June.

1iora
March 21st, 2012, 02:59 PM
I did read the catinfo page. I found it a little soapboxy/fire and brimstone. In addition, I understand the point, but there is a crucial logic flaw in the entire argument: she continuously assumes that cats are either being fed dry foods with grain in them or wet foods without grain. Roo is on grain free food. Therefore, the main problem is water intake.

I prefer http://stevesrealfood.com/grainfree-kibble/ for your point (but this suggests canned food isn't sufficient either)

I've been closely observing Roo (he's new, after all), and he drinks what appears to be a decent amount of water. He always drinks after eating the kibble, and he grazes on the kibble so he drinks frequently. He drinks without eating as well, and isn't picky about the freshness of the water, though he'll go out of his way to lap up the fresh. In addition, the kibble is 10% moisture (I'm sure some cats don't get enough water, and if Roo quits drinking as much, or gets a metabolic-associated disorder, I'll review).

It's not as simple as opening a can of food twice a day. It's more expensive, I'm not going to force him to try to lick around the rim of a sharp can so I'd have to scoop it out and wash the spoon, and I'm not going to put a can in the landfill so I'd have to rinse each one out thoroughly. And then I would wind up with an extra bag of recycles to put out. I would sooner make my own cat food than do that, actually. It's wasteful and the quality of the ingredients is still insufficient.
Once I manage to get myself on a raw, evolutionarily-logical diet, I'll work on getting the cat on one.

I did look into the dehydrated food, which is raw and you reconstitute it yourself with water (less packaging waste!) but that's not in my budget.

sugarcatmom
March 21st, 2012, 04:38 PM
I did read the catinfo page. I found it a little soapboxy/fire and brimstone.

Here's more info, perhaps with a little less fire and brimstone:
http://maxshouse.com/feline_nutrition.htm
http://www.catinfo.org/docs/zorans_article.pdf
http://feline-nutrition.org/health/species-inappropriate-the-dangers-of-dry-food

In addition, I understand the point, but there is a crucial logic flaw in the entire argument: she continuously assumes that cats are either being fed dry foods with grain in them or wet foods without grain. Roo is on grain free food.

Grain-free does not mean starch-free. Most of these foods just replace corn/wheat/rice whatever with potatoes or peas or tapioca. While I certainly think if one was insistent on feeding kibble that grain-free would be the better choice, it's still not an ideal way to feed a cat, and that's due to the low moisture content.


Therefore, the main problem is water intake.

I've been closely observing Roo (he's new, after all), and he drinks what appears to be a decent amount of water.

Appearances can be deceiving. From the Max's House link above:

The cat's natural diet, live prey, contains between 65%-75% water. The cat, having evolved on the plains of Africa, has adapted to obtain her water requirements almost entirely on the moisture content in her prey. Cats can live for long periods without drinking water when receiving food containing 67-73% water but become dehydrated when the water content of the food is 63% or less. The water content of the commercial foods commonly fed to cats varies from 8% in dry foods to over 75% in canned foods; thus the amount of drinking water required is affected substantially by the water content of the food.

When fed canned food (80% moisture) with access to drinking water, cats obtain over 90% of their total water intake from the diet, whereas on dry food, 96% of the total water intake is obtained by drinking. The total free water intake (from food and drinking water) decreases when cats are fed dry food only, so that the water to dry matter intake ratio when fed on commercial dry foods varies from 2.0 to 2.8: 1 whereas on canned foods it varies from 3. 0 to 5.7: 1. Thus for any given dry matter intake cats have a higher water turnover on canned than on dry foods. (National Research Council [National Academy of Science] Nutrient Requirements of Cats).

Diet moisture content is related to the observation that cats fed dry food drink more six times more water than cats fed canned food but that much of this water contributes to fecal moisture so that urine volume is lower and urine specific gravity higher in cats fed dry food. The urine concentration of all solutes, including potentially calculogenic crystalloids, depends on urine volume. Cats increase voluntary water intake when fed dry food but not in sufficient amounts to fully compensate for the lower moisture content of the food. In a recent study, cats consuming a diet containing 10% moisture with free access to drinking water had an average daily urine volume of 63 milliliters (ml). This volume increased to 112 ml/day when fed a canned diet with a moisture content of 75%. Urine specific gravity was also higher in cats that were fed the low-moisture food. Decreased urine volume may be an important risk factor for the development of urolithiasis in cats. Diets that cause a decrease in total fluid turnover can result in decreased urine volume and increased urine concentration, both of which may contribute to urolithiasis in cats.



Roo quits drinking as much, or gets a metabolic-associated disorder, I'll review).

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, or something along those lines.

It's more expensive,

Not as expensive as a perineal urethrostomy (aka penis removal) to save the life of a cat with a severely blocked urinary tract.

I would sooner make my own cat food than do that, actually.

:thumbs up That would be the best option of all! But until you're in a position to do it, wet food is a step up from dry.

Good luck!

Love4himies
March 22nd, 2012, 11:33 AM
I've been closely observing Roo (he's new, after all), and he drinks what appears to be a decent amount of water. He always drinks after eating the kibble, and he grazes on the kibble so he drinks frequently. He drinks without eating as well, and isn't picky about the freshness of the water, though he'll go out of his way to lap up the fresh. In addition, the kibble is 10% moisture (I'm sure some cats don't get enough water, and if Roo quits drinking as much, or gets a metabolic-associated disorder, I'll review).

Lapping up water is not the same as drinking out of a glass as humans do. You should try it when you are really thirsty to get a feel for how much is really being taken in. It's a real eye opener

It's not as simple as opening a can of food twice a day. It's more expensive, I'm not going to force him to try to lick around the rim of a sharp can so I'd have to scoop it out and wash the spoon, and I'm not going to put a can in the landfill so I'd have to rinse each one out thoroughly. And then I would wind up with an extra bag of recycles to put out. I would sooner make my own cat food than do that, actually. It's wasteful and the quality of the ingredients is still insufficient.

But isn't the health of your kitty worth that couple of minutes a day of extra work :lovestruck:?
Once I manage to get myself on a raw, evolutionarily-logical diet, I'll work on getting the cat on one.

Absolutely 100% cheaper and if made properly better than canned :thumbs up. I make my own, takes 1 hour a month to make enough to feed 4 kitties 50% raw.


I did look into the dehydrated food, which is raw and you reconstitute it yourself with water (less packaging waste!) but that's not in my budget.

Yes, dehydrated is very expensive, and I still am not sure if all the amino acids keep their structural integrity.

sandyrivers
March 22nd, 2012, 10:07 PM
HI,

Congrats on getting your cat from the shelter! As well as offering a home to an older cat!

As far as him throwing up parts of undigested fod, if it was only in the beginning, he was probably just eating too fast, perhaps in the past, he had to gobble up whatever food was there as fast as possible. Once he knows there will from now on always be food, this should stop. Many of my cats, all of them rescued, did this in the beginning, I would not be overly concerned, but if it keeps happening, even after the change of food, you could talk to your vet about it.

As for being cuddly and then not so cuddly, well I also think that he needs time to adjust, it's only been a week. After a month or so, he should settle down and be more confident..

Keep in mind that all cats are not ''lap cats''... Two of my cats rarely, if ever cuddle! Tonali and Katla never accepted to be picked up and walked around the house in our arms, nor do they come to sleep and lay on our lap. They seem content to sleep and lay beside us out of arm's reach. Or lay on our clothes, or just sit on the computer table looking at us work. I never forced them to cuddle or to hold them.
each cat has it's own personality, and even if some are not cuddlers, they do love us just the same as those who are.

Good luck to you.

sandyrivers