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Chico HyperT.

chico2
December 30th, 2011, 10:15 AM
Here we go again...Chico now has been diagnosed with HyperT like Rocky and is on Felimazole 2.5mg twice daily.
He has shown none of the symptoms Rocky had,except a little weightloss.
His number was 59,where high normal was 50 and the vet wants him down to 20.
Chico is easy to pill and some genius came up with sugar-coated pills,which is great.
We might consider the Iodine treatment,but right now we'll see how the neds work.

Rgeurts
December 30th, 2011, 02:25 PM
Chico, I'm so sorry :(
What causes the HyperT in cats? I know what it is for dogs, but I'm sure cats are different. Give him and fluffball Vinnie loves for me!! And a big :grouphug: to you!

chico2
December 30th, 2011, 03:48 PM
Robyn.it's ok,he is his normal happy self,the cuddliest cat on earth,loves everybody(except Vinnie)and pilling him is no problem.
Growlers kitty had the Iodine treatment,we might consider it,especially after what happened with Rocky.

Goldfields
December 30th, 2011, 06:13 PM
That's bad luck, Chico2. I hope his meds work well for him.

hazelrunpack
December 30th, 2011, 07:08 PM
Sorry to hear about Chico! :( At least he's easy to pill, which is a blessing. Is the iodine treatment you mentioned the radioactive isotope that knocks out the thyroid? Would you have to supplement with thyroid hormone afterward?

I hope his meds do the trick!

growler~GateKeeper
December 31st, 2011, 12:45 AM
Sorry to hear Chico has HyperT now too :grouphug: I'm glad he's easier about taking his pills :cat:

See how he does on the pills for a bit & then discuss options with the vet, Chico may do very well on the meds alone. If you have any questions about the RaId let me know.

Is the iodine treatment you mentioned the radioactive isotope that knocks out the thyroid? Would you have to supplement with thyroid hormone afterward?

Some cats will require thyroid replacement hormones afterwards it depends on how far below normal it drops to and how long it stays there. Many cats it just drops them below for a short time & they rebound to the low end of normal.

Duffy wasn't very high above normal to start with, therefore got a lower dose of RaId & it dropped her so low the test couldn't read an accurate number for about 6 months just that it was "below 6". The specialist didn't think it was necessary to put her on replacement therapy. After that her T4 number rose to sit at the low end of normal occasionally dipping below.

hazelrunpack
December 31st, 2011, 08:47 AM
Thx, growler!

chico2
December 31st, 2011, 12:12 PM
Growler,Hazel and GF,thank you for your concerns.
Growler,I think even my vet wants to wait a bit before any decision on R.A.I.D.
Rocky was always famished,always wanted to eat but not gaining weight,Chico is not like that,he eats well,but is not hungry like Rocky was.
He had lost 400gr since the last visit about 6 months ago,but has gained it back..
Growler,thank you for always stepping in when people need help:grouphug:

Goldfields
December 31st, 2011, 05:46 PM
Am I right in thinking that HyperT is almost exclusively a cat problem and HypoT is almost exclusively a dog problem? Thought I read that somewhere.

hazelrunpack
December 31st, 2011, 06:13 PM
I know that dogs only rarely exhibit the symptoms of hyperthyroidism, GF. Canines clear excess thyroid hormone much better than humans do. But yes, in dogs hypothyroidism is a problem. English setters are prone to the disorder--we have three on thyroid meds now. Thankfully, it's cheap and effective. :)

growler~GateKeeper
January 1st, 2012, 12:37 AM
Am I right in thinking that HyperT is almost exclusively a cat problem and HypoT is almost exclusively a dog problem? Thought I read that somewhere.

That is correct, though with everything there will be the exception to the "rule" and although rare you will find the opposite. The Radioactive Iodine treatment for cats with HyperT can, as mentioned above, occasionally put a cat into HypoT where they will need hormone replacement therapy to bring the numbers back into normal range.

Goldfields
January 1st, 2012, 09:10 AM
Is there a similar radioactive treatment for humans? I'm hypothyroid so don't know that much about the opposite. I think now that it was one of my vets who said HyperT was usually what cats had. Poor cats.

chico2
January 1st, 2012, 09:30 AM
I wish it was possible to remove the Thyroid,a girl I know had the surgery done.
My vet said it's too risky on a cat,not many vets are capable of doing it.

Goldfields
January 1st, 2012, 04:13 PM
I can imagine how delicate an op. it would be, Chico. Shame it isn't as easy as a spay. Must have been painful for your friend.
Hazel, I didn't know that about English Setters. My brother once had a pair but they must have been okay or I'd have heard about it. Our Dundee is hypoT. I suspect Shelties might be prone to it also.

Winston
January 1st, 2012, 06:04 PM
Chico I dont know much about Hyper T but just wanted to send you a big hug! and smooches for the boys! I hope his numbers come down. :thumbs up

growler~GateKeeper
January 3rd, 2012, 12:00 AM
Is there a similar radioactive treatment for humans? I'm hypothyroid so don't know that much about the opposite. I think now that it was one of my vets who said HyperT was usually what cats had. Poor cats.

There is RaId for humans with HyperT as well:
http://www.cancer.org/Cancer/ThyroidCancer/DetailedGuide/thyroid-cancer-treating-radioactive-iodine
http://www.endocrinologist.com/Radioactive.html
http://www.radiologyinfo.org/en/info.cfm?pg=radioiodine


I wish it was possible to remove the Thyroid,a girl I know had the surgery done.
My vet said it's too risky on a cat,not many vets are capable of doing it.

It is possible, the problem there is the gland is actually very small, in a delicate position and there are 2 para-thyroid glands very close to it that have a different function which could also be distrupted/destroyed. One would have to be extremely careful to perform this surgery on such a small animal. :cat: