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Worried about cat and 'soon to be' dog??

someweirddude
December 29th, 2011, 10:27 PM
Ok so I have a declawed cat and took a trip yesterday and found a dog that we will most likely end up adopting tomorrow, i talked my dad into it. well the dog is a purebred pitbull that was neglected, beaten by previous owners and seems to be pretty mellow. the dog is extremely dominant though. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE tell me that there is a way to do this. because i really love this dog and want some advice on how to make this happen. i mean they could love eachother for all i know but what if they hate eachother? i wouldnt want my cat dead..


please help:(

Digston
December 30th, 2011, 09:56 AM
There will always be a risk when introducing an adult dog into your home when you have other animals. You can never be sure exactly how they will react to each other.

My advice to you would be to find a professional dog trainer in your area that has experience working with med/lrg breed dominate dogs. The dominance thing will most definately need to be addressed. It would be beneficial to you to look into this before you adopt the dog. Abused dogs will sometimes hide some of their more violent behaviours until they have been in the new home for a bit. So even if you think he is okay now, things may change.

Never leave the cat alone with the dog. That will be the most important thing.

Depending on where the dog is coming from you may be able to set up a trial adoption or a meet and greet with your cat.

marko
December 30th, 2011, 10:06 AM
Digston gives fab advice here.

You are dealing with a pretty big unknown and it might work out...but because it is an unknown and the potential for serious problems is there...


Never leave the cat alone with the dog. That will be the most important thing.

Not even for 5 minutes, ever.

When I say ever...I mean until you are 100% sure that there is no risk.

For me, I would say that that would require at least 6-12 months to be sure....and if I saw anything between the dog and the cat (after obedience training) that made my spidey senses tingle, it would literally mean ever.

I don't know how abused this dog was OR how this dog will react to other animals...but digston's "trial" advice is fab. In fact, I personally would not adopt this dog without some type of pre-adoption meet and greet....and if that initial meet and greet did not go well...for me, I probably would not adopt this dog. Good luck!

chico2
December 30th, 2011, 10:29 AM
The declawed fact,put up a RED flag for me,your cat might not be able to jump up quickly,away from the dog,or defend himself in any way..
A Pit-Bull is a terrier and Terriers have high preydrive,just like any other terrier.
I can see you'd love this dog and he obviously needs a lot of love,seeing he came from a abusive situation,but love is not always enough,you've gotten some good advice and I hope it works out and you can take him to an experienced trainer.
Kudos to you for wanting to rescue a needy Pittie.:grouphug:

Edenca
December 30th, 2011, 12:28 PM
You didn't mention the age of your cat or if it had ever been in contact with other dogs. Personally, if there was even 1 % risk to the life of my cat, I would not even attempt it. Couldn't you try to find another home for the dog? I have 5 cats and have been extremely tempted to adopt another one ( being a volunteer for a rescue agency) but will not, no matter how much I may love the potential "new" cat. It would not be fair to the cats I already have, who get along well and have a nice balance. What happens if the dog is fine but the cat starts peeing around the house to "punish" you? I would be willing to bet that it would be the cat who is sent away. I have seen this happen over and over.

Rgeurts
December 30th, 2011, 02:18 PM
What happens if the dog is fine but the cat starts peeing around the house to "punish" you? I would be willing to bet that it would be the cat who is sent away. I have seen this happen over and over.

Edenca, that is a very unfair assumption on your part. Especially seeing as how he has come here looking for advice on how to proceed with his cats interest in mind.

someweirddude, you have been given some great advice. If is a humane society you are adopting from, a meet and greet should be fairly easy. The same with most rescue groups. That's the way I would go! I would also take the advice regarding the professional trainer to make sure your new addition adjusts well!

Good luck :)

Edenca
December 30th, 2011, 04:10 PM
Edenca, that is a very unfair assumption on your part. Especially seeing as how he has come here looking for advice on how to proceed with his cats interest in mind.

someweirddude, you have been given some great advice. If is a humane society you are adopting from, a meet and greet should be fairly easy. The same with most rescue groups. That's the way I would go! I would also take the advice regarding the professional trainer to make sure your new addition adjusts well!

Good luck :)

I was under the impression that he was asking whether it was a good idea TO proceed and in my opinion it is not. I have been associated with a rescue group for cats for the last 8 years and one of the reasons for dumping the cat is because it cannot get along with the "new" dog. There are rrescue groups for Pit-bulls and crosses so, why not get some professional help there?

Rgeurts
December 30th, 2011, 04:54 PM
I was under the impression that he was asking whether it was a good idea TO proceed and in my opinion it is not. I have been associated with a rescue group for cats for the last 8 years and one of the reasons for dumping the cat is because it cannot get along with the "new" dog. There are rrescue groups for Pit-bulls and crosses so, why not get some professional help there?

I understand you don't think it's a good idea, and that's fine! It was your assumption he would just "dump" the cat that I was referring to. I see no problem with him wanting to give a deserving animal a loving home, whether it be a cat, dog, ferret etc. They ALL deserve a good home. Why place this dog in a rescue if someone is willing to take it, train it and intergrate it into the family? Doesn't it deserve it as much as the cat? If the 2 can get along, wonderful! That's why people recommend a meet and greet and a trial basis. I see no reason at all that he shouldn't check out his options. By your statement, anyone with a single animal should not consider getting another because it may cause stress? How many more animals would you be looking after in the rescue you're associated with, if that were the case?

Anyway.... I see no issue with at least trying to see if it will work out. Chances are it may be cat aggressive, who knows :shrug:
But you never know unless you try.

Goldfields
December 30th, 2011, 07:16 PM
I don't know what the cat being declawed has to do with it, I mean I would not want even my clawed cats being confronted by an extremely dominant pit bull. You are responsible for both their lives. A Neopolitan Mastiff was put down here yesterday for attacking first his owner and putting him in Hospital, then that guy's mother when she tried to stop it fighting her own dog. It took off her thumb and part of some fingers, while the son has facial injuries and is missing some of his finger tips. And the dog of course is dead, :( simply because those two animals were obviously not compatible. (I assume of course that the son also was trying to break up a fight.)
Robyn, it's what could happen if that cat and Pitbull don't get on that worries me, the cat wouldn't stand a chance. Is someone going to be there 24/7 to monitior the situation? Or is there a very secure yard the dog, or cat could be in when there is not? My motto is always ' when in doubt, don't.'

Edenca
December 31st, 2011, 12:08 AM
I understand you don't think it's a good idea, and that's fine! It was your assumption he would just "dump" the cat that I was referring to. I see no problem with him wanting to give a deserving animal a loving home, whether it be a cat, dog, ferret etc. They ALL deserve a good home. Why place this dog in a rescue if someone is willing to take it, train it and intergrate it into the family? Doesn't it deserve it as much as the cat? If the 2 can get along, wonderful! That's why people recommend a meet and greet and a trial basis. I see no reason at all that he shouldn't check out his options. By your statement, anyone with a single animal should not consider getting another because it may cause stress? How many more animals would you be looking after in the rescue you're associated with, if that were the case?

Anyway.... I see no issue with at least trying to see if it will work out. Chances are it may be cat aggressive, who knows :shrug:
But you never know unless you try.

I did not say that anyone with a single animal should not try to adopt another. We have placed many cats with a family with other animals, both cats and dogs and it has worked out wonderfully, however, none of those have been abused pit bulls.We rescue and adopt out roughly 500 cats a year and have heard every excuse in the book for people wishing to send their cats to the shelter. We also do "call backs" to check to see that everything is going well. Some of those reponses are not always good and some are dog related. I am just sayin that I would not put my cat's life at risk for a dog that I just met yesterday.

Edenca
December 31st, 2011, 07:32 AM
Also, that type of dog needs someone who knows how to handle a dog with abuse issues. Being kind-hearted and having good intentions, is not enough...IMO.

BenMax
December 31st, 2011, 07:55 AM
There is more to this than just a successful interaction between dog and cat.
Please ask yourself the question which is do you have experience with an abused dog with dominence issues? What is your lifestyle like? Do you interact alot with people who have dogs? Do you like to frequent dog parks? Since you said you talked a parent into it, do they have the time and energy to take care of this dog if you are away from home?

A declawed cat is at a huge disadvantage. Extreme caution is to be taken when introducing a dog and a cat. There is also no guarantee that your cat and this dog will actually be compatible.

Any respectful shelter or rescue would consult with you and ensure first and foremost if this is the right dog for you. I would hope that if they are considering you as a potential candidate for this dog, that they will cat test first. Regardless, you never know once you get this dog home if infact this dog would accept your cat and visa versa.

I know sometimes it is hard to make the right choice, but in this case the right choice is very dependant on you, your father, the cat and the dog.

Rgeurts
December 31st, 2011, 11:19 AM
Let me clarify my comment here:

I never said bringing a vicious dog into any home is a good idea. My entire point was that the fact that Edenca automatically assumed this person would dump his cat. He obviously cares about it or he wouldn't be here. To me, that was a very unfair, and even borderline rude, comment. Any dog, not just a pittie, that has been abused (and we don't even know what type of abuse) has the potential to be dangerous in the wrong hands. For that matter, any dog, period, has the potential. But just because it's been abused doesn't mean it shouldn't be given a chance. Can this person handle a dominant dog? No clue, I don't know him, and neither does anyone else here. And I'm not going to "assume" anything. My point was simply that it shouldn't just be thrown into a rescue and forgotten about. There are several pitties I know that were seriously abused who have been taken into loving homes (homes with cats as well) and are doing wonderfully.

Edenca
December 31st, 2011, 04:58 PM
I did not say that the OP would "dump" his cat. I said that in my experience, that is one of the reasons that cats are surrendered to shelters. Usually, the cat is in the home first and when a new dog is introduced, the cat begins to have issues such as peeing around the house. That is when the cat is blamed and surrendered. I was not trying to be rude, just giving an opinion, which, apparently is not the popular one on this forum.

Goldfields
December 31st, 2011, 05:29 PM
I don't understand how the dog is pretty mellow yet extremely dominant at the same time, :shrug: and Robyn, he said he wouldn't want his cat dead, which made me wonder if the environment is a safe one for the cat if the dog is there? Jarrah might attack our outdoor cats if they run from her but they are safe because they can go out of the yard, up a tree, onto the tankstand, under the house etc.. My brother's Bull Terrier on the other hand cornered a cat under their caravan, on concrete, and made such a mess of his nails, trying to dig under to get it that for some time he had to be carried in and out of the house to toilet. I just hope that where any cat and dog live together offers the cat full protection(and sometimes protection for the stupid dog, against its own actions, like Brutus :D ).
Of course my argument will always be that the cat was there first, and that someweirddude is not the one who has thrown this dog into rescue and forgotten about it, so he should never be made to feel he's let it down if he opts for something more compatible with his cat.
You know, I watched a pit bull attack a Dog Ranger(or whatever you call them there) on TV and just fail to see how a scratch from a cat would ever deter one that meant business.