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If you think BSL doesn't affect you your wrong

mastifflover
December 12th, 2011, 06:49 AM
This is happening in North Carolina and is horrifying. So if you thought your dog was safe think again

New Policy Requires All Chows, Danes, Dobermans, Mastiffs, Rotties, Shepherds, All Bully Breeds To Be Killed NC Shelter (Fayetteville, NC )

There is a breed ban set to go into affect Monday the 5th of December all Dobermans, Rottweilers, Chow Chows, German Shepherds, Great Danes, Pitbulls, Mastiffs (all bully breeds), Akitas and Huskies.


Cumberland County`s reason for this is they do not want to be held liable for these breeds and the possible problems with them after adoption from the shelter. A simple waiver should solve this.

We need to let them know that this is not the answer.
Here's the link
http://our-compass.org/2011/12/01/new-policy-requires-all-chows-danes-dobermans-mastiffs-rotties-shepherds-all-bully-breeds-to-be-killed-nc-shelter/

These dogs will be held for the mandatory 72 hrs and then will be killed, THEY WILL NOT BE GIVEN A CHANCE TO BE ADOPTED.

If the dog is an owner turn-in, he will be killed the second he walks into the back.

ETA just found this news article about it
http://www.fayobserver.com/articles/2011/11/30/1140687?sac=Local
Staff writer

The Cumberland County Animal Control Board is recommending that authorities limit the adoption of dog breeds that one county official described as attack animals, officials said.

The idea is only in the discussion stages but has already created an uproar among animal advocates, according to Dr. John Lauby, Animal Control director.

The board is suggesting that county residents be banned from adopting Rottweilers, American Staffordshire terriers, pit bulls, chow-chows, Presa Canarios or any mix of those breeds, Lauby said.

County Commissioner Charles Evans, who serves on the Animal Control board, said the issue is about the safety of residents.

"We're looking at a list of animals used as attack animals," Evans said. "It has been suggested that something needs to be done about those."

The recommendation must go to the county's Policy Committee and then to the full Board of Commissioners for final approval, Lauby said.

Each day, Lauby said, Animal Control receives more than 200 calls from residents complaining about dogs running loose, preventing people from getting into their cars or behaving aggressively, Lauby said.

"We have an inordinate number of pit bulls in the county that are chasing people, chasing dogs, they're on school grounds and generally bother people," he said. "The reality is that about 80 percent of our calls are related to that particular breed."

Since April, Animal Control has taken in nearly 1,300 pit bulls, but only 124 have been adopted, Lauby said. It's the same problem for other "bully breed" dogs, he said.

The shelter has taken in 180 Rottweilers since April and only 26 have been adopted. Fifteen of the 96 chow-chows received at the shelter have been adopted, Lauby said.

Dogs that aren't adopted are put down.

If these breeds aren't adopted out, Evans said he wants to know more about what their fate would be.

"I really want to understand what would be done with these types of animals," Evans said.

They could be turned over to breed-specific rescue groups, Lauby said, but those operating locally are at full capacity.

Another option is to try to network nationwide with groups in communities that are looking for dogs to put up for adoption.

Lauby said he is working with his contacts to see what operations are available.

The last option is euthanasia, Lauby said.

Animal advocates maintain that it's not a particular breed of dog that presents a danger, but it's irresponsible owners.

"People should be screened for suitability before being allowed to adopt any animal," said Shelby Townsend, president of Unchain Cumberland County, a group that helped bring about a ban against tethering of animals.

Evans agreed.

"They should be adopted to responsible individuals (who) make sure they're taking care of them and make sure they follow the guidelines set by Animal Control."

Staff writer Nancy McCleary can be reached at mcclearyn@fayobserver.com or 486-3568.

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Myka
December 12th, 2011, 09:25 AM
Each day, Lauby said, Animal Control receives more than 200 calls from residents complaining about dogs [...] "We have an inordinate number of pit bulls in the county that are chasing people, chasing dogs, they're on school grounds and generally bother people," he said. "The reality is that about 80 percent of our calls are related to that particular breed."

That's because people don't know what a Pit Bull looks like.

When people ask what kind of dog I have and I say, "She's an American Staffordshire Terrier." They look at me blankly. So I tell them she looks like an American Bulldog (she doesn't really) which they then think she's 15" tall because they don't know the different between an American Bulldog and a French or English Bulldog. :shrug:

Melinda
December 12th, 2011, 12:19 PM
thank you for posting this, I'm going to the page you suggested to let them know....how dare they.............

Melinda
December 12th, 2011, 12:24 PM
there, sent them each a letter and will pass the site on to others

mastifflover
December 13th, 2011, 05:08 AM
Thanks Melinda. But we all knew this would be the fallout from BSL. No dog is exempt sadly.

Melinda
December 13th, 2011, 05:34 AM
yes, exactly, man, when are they going to start going after the owners? or at least take it case by case of aggressive dogs, not breeds....