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Umbilical Training

FionaBeth
December 2nd, 2011, 09:07 AM
Hey everyone. I have recently decided to begin umbilical training with my dog. He is a 1 1/2 year old black lab that my husband and I adopted in May, and he struggles with listening to commands/paying attention in general, which is why I have decided to try this technique. He is fine in the house, but I do have a question about walks. I know that with umbilical training I am in the one that needs to be in complete control- but how does this work when he needs to use the bathroom on a walk? He tends to pull me when he needs to go to the bathroom (which is a large improvement from when we first adopted him and he pulled throughout the entire walk). Should I allow him to pull when he needs to use the bathroom, or during umbilical training do I need to decide when that happens? I appreciate any advice that you could give me :)

Marty11
December 2nd, 2011, 09:17 AM
I know that dogs need their "marking time". My trainer used to say allow the first 10 minutes or so to walk leisure and sniff and then (she recommended I change the collar) tell the dog "heel" or "working" and change the whole body language with the dog and walk assertively. Maybe at the end of the walk to go back to leisure again. If your dog gets to "mark" they feel satified and it relieves the boredom, so it is necessary. There are very knowledgable trainers here on this forum.

breeze
December 2nd, 2011, 09:31 AM
when I'm walking with my dogs, I usually decide when it's a good time for them to go pee and poop.
they may pull once to inform me it's time to go, then I chose a spot that is appropriate, I tell them to go pee and allow them "sniff time" and then back to my heel again
we might do this a couple of time on the walk

GalaxiesKuklos
December 9th, 2011, 05:23 PM
Hey everyone. I have recently decided to begin umbilical training with my dog. He is a 1 1/2 year old black lab that my husband and I adopted in May, and he struggles with listening to commands/paying attention in general, which is why I have decided to try this technique. He is fine in the house, but I do have a question about walks. I know that with umbilical training I am in the one that needs to be in complete control- but how does this work when he needs to use the bathroom on a walk? He tends to pull me when he needs to go to the bathroom (which is a large improvement from when we first adopted him and he pulled throughout the entire walk). Should I allow him to pull when he needs to use the bathroom, or during umbilical training do I need to decide when that happens? I appreciate any advice that you could give me :)

I think you are talking about the distorted version of umbilical training promoted by Brad Pattison which relies on force an punishment to get compliance from a dog.

Umbilical as first used was used to promote a positive, trusting relationship not for domineering control. To keep the puppy under supervision while freeing your hands and keeping the dog close.


http://www.shirleychong.com/keepers/dance.html

Canadianbella
December 27th, 2011, 09:14 PM
I'd be careful with the umbilical training as you may soon have a large dog in front of you at all times. BUT i'm not bashing it.

When he needs to pee, where exactly is he pulling you? over to a patch where he decides it's acceptable to pee?

tenderfoot
December 28th, 2011, 06:42 PM
When you step outside, walk ahead of your dog to a close destination. Plant yourself and allow the dog to sniff and soil within the circle created by the length of the leash. No pulling. The best way to ensure no pulling is to lock your leash hand in your pocket. This way if he tries to pull he hits a stopping point. It is very important that you don't give an inch. If you Evers allow your dog to put pressure on his collar and move even one inch forward then he is learning to pull.
After you have given him enough time to sniff and soil then move ahead on your walk. Do not stop again until you decide, maintaining a loose leash with your dog behind your toe line.